Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS)

srothman

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Anyone recently do this?

I need to do this as part of my corporate training. They split it up in three flavors of Linux (CentOS 7, OpenSUSE 13.1, and Ubuntu 14.04).

In any case, I decided to base it on OpenSUSE, but that seems rather old considering the current version of OpenSUSE is 42.2.

This shouldn't make too much of a difference though, surely?

I initially thought maybe doing the exam on CentOS, but everyone I ask tells me it's a bit of a dog.
 

Murlin

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I haven't done anything recently.

I found the LPI doesn't carry much weight as it is all multiple choice.
The RHCSA and RHCE is much better due to the test being completely practical.

Recently there is talk about putting together a Devops exam via the LPI. This is the first qualification in a longtime where the topics interesting.
 

SauRoNZA

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I haven't done anything recently.

I found the LPI doesn't carry much weight as it is all multiple choice.
The RHCSA and RHCE is much better due to the test being completely practical.

Recently there is talk about putting together a Devops exam via the LPI. This is the first qualification in a longtime where the topics interesting.
Wasn't multiple choice when I did it but even so it is a terrible exam and as you say not worth it's salt compared to RHCSA and RHCE.

OP if you can convince your company rather do RHCSA.


****

Also LPI isn't a case of choosing one and doing an either/or. They cover the whole lot and the exam does the same, unless it's changed significantly in the last few years.
 

SauRoNZA

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Sorry it seems Murlin threw me off.

@Murlin OP is talking about Linux Foundation not Linux Professional Institute.

Two very different entities and in that case LF is still much better than LPI, however I would still opt for Red Hat instead purely from a future opportunity and growth perspective.
 

srothman

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Sorry it seems Murlin threw me off.

@Murlin OP is talking about Linux Foundation not Linux Professional Institute.

Two very different entities and in that case LF is still much better than LPI, however I would still opt for Red Hat instead purely from a future opportunity and growth perspective.
100%. Sorry, I should add some context. This is towards my Linux on Azure credential, so not a whole lot of flexibility ito choosing an alternative.
 

SauRoNZA

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100%. Sorry, I should add some context. This is towards my Linux on Azure credential, so not a whole lot of flexibility ito choosing an alternative.
Aaah okay that does make more sense then.

In that case I would say go with CentOS because it's effectively RedHat which will give you a bigger foot in the door at any RedHat shop down the line.

Ultimately there isn't all that much between them, but RH is still the standard and you'll find them vs other more obscure options like HP-UX and SunOS long before other flavours of pure Linux.

The "bit of a dog" comment doesn't really make sense unless the people making those comments are playing with the GUI which at this level shouldn't even be a concern and you can change if you absolutely need to.

Connecting to hundreds of servers across the world I have never found one running a GUI, it simply doesn't happen in production but then that might just be my field.
 

srothman

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Aaah okay that does make more sense then.

In that case I would say go with CentOS because it's effectively RedHat which will give you a bigger foot in the door at any RedHat shop down the line.

Ultimately there isn't all that much between them, but RH is still the standard and you'll find them vs other more obscure options like HP-UX and SunOS long before other flavours of pure Linux.

The "bit of a dog" comment doesn't really make sense unless the people making those comments are playing with the GUI which at this level shouldn't even be a concern and you can change if you absolutely need to.

Connecting to hundreds of servers across the world I have never found one running a GUI, it simply doesn't happen in production but then that might just be my field.
Solid advice, thank you.

Like I mentioned, my initial.though was to go with CentOS, but based was put off due to the feedback I got from other "in the know".

You make a good case for, and it's actually very logical, might as well do it on the "dog"... can only getting better then, right ;)
 

SauRoNZA

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Solid advice, thank you.

Like I mentioned, my initial.though was to go with CentOS, but based was put off due to the feedback I got from other "in the know".

You make a good case for, and it's actually very logical, might as well do it on the "dog"... can only getting better then, right ;)
I’m guessing you don’t have any Linux experience? Or very little?

Ultimately if you can use one you can use the other.

The little differences can be learnt fairly quickly and you generally use them once or twice and then it’s learned. Usually applies to more obscure things anyway that aren’t day to day operations.
 

srothman

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No I have some (enough to keep the lights on, but by no means a guru), but I also know there are subtle differences between Debian-based systems and RPM-based systems.

My question was more around whether there would be significant differences from v13.x of OpenSUSE vs. v42.x.

Last thing I want to do is have a specific feature available to me, and then not have it because I have to sit for the test of an outdated version of the OS, although I'm sure this won't be the case.

But I think I might just go the CentOS route, you've said some very true things.
 

jsheed_sa

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I'm looking at doing this either next month or September.

It's part of the requirements for the MCSA: Linux on Azure cert track.

I've already done Compita Linux+ / LPIC1 / LPIC2 / SUSE CLA / SUSE CLP / RHCSA / RHCE so I think its probably going to be fairly easy - i'll probably opt to do it on either Ubuntu or CentOS.

TIP: If you want to save $$$ on the LFCS exam then opt to take the MS exam that includes a rewrite. It costs $79 vs $55 for a single exam BUT it includes a discount voucher for the LFCS and brings the cost down to $99 as opposed to $300 (so you save $201).
 

srothman

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Ah snap, thanks. Will be looking at doing that for sure, thanks.

Edit: I'll probably end up selling the MS exam voucher, as I've already done all the MS-related Azure exams, which include 70-533.
 
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jsheed_sa

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Ah snap, thanks. Will be looking at doing that for sure, thanks.

Edit: I'll probably end up selling the MS exam voucher, as I've already done all the MS-related Azure exams, which include 70-533.

I'm due to write the 70-533 on the 1st of August. How did you find the exam?

I've already done the AWS Architect Associate exam - I figure this is going to be pretty similar?

Also OpenSuse - 13.1 - damn that's old! Release Date: 2013-11-19.

Then again Ubuntu 14 is 2014 and so is Centos 7. I suspect we're actually being tested on a distro thats 3-4 years out of date anyhow...
 
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srothman

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It's wasn't bad, but I've been working Azure for a while. Not being a developer by any means, I found the dev-related questions a bit of a challenge, but not impossible.

If you know Powershell in the Azure context, you can create and interpret json files, and you have a sound understanding of cloud technologies (from the sounds of it you do), you'll do fine, I'm sure.

Will this be your first Azure exam?
 

jsheed_sa

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It's wasn't bad, but I've been working Azure for a while. Not being a developer by any means, I found the dev-related questions a bit of a challenge, but not impossible.

If you know Powershell in the Azure context, you can create and interpret json files, and you have a sound understanding of cloud technologies (from the sounds of it you do), you'll do fine, I'm sure.

Will this be your first Azure exam?
First MS exam. First Azure exam.

Funny that, as I've managed to avoid MS certification for 10+ years now. :D
 

srothman

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First MS exam. First Azure exam.

Funny that, as I've managed to avoid MS certification for 10+ years now. :D
Off topic, but I think there is a lot less rivalry between the two. With MS being one of the biggest contributors to open source, I think they've seen the light, so to speak. In addition for coming into their own as enterprise class technologies, their business model has changed considerably, where they don't care what runs in their platform, as long as it runs on their platform, ie Azure.

Linux and Azure is going g to be the future of enterprise class cloud platforms, imho. Google is gaining good ground, and both Azure and Google is going to get a lot closer to AWS in the coming years as far as market share and functionality is concerned.

All speculation, of course :)
 

srothman

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So just as an FYI. Pretty much answers the question I had around versioning.

update.JPG
 

srothman

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Exam booked, want to get it done by October, which seems to be more than enough time considering the level of experienced required for this. Got the exam bundled with the training and the DevOps course for $269-.
 

jsheed_sa

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Passed the 70-533 today.

I should tackle the LFCS sometime in September I'd think.
 

srothman

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Passed the 70-533 today.

I should tackle the LFCS sometime in September I'd think.
Nice one! Yeah I'm targeting mid-September. Not liking the official course though, not using it that much. Working through the objectives on my own, but it's actually not that bad, even for an MS admin.
 
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