Performance loss over 25m with cat6

SAguy

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No, other than the wires are typically slightly thicker and thus require cat6 plugs, which may be an issue for you. Solved by spending the... 5c or so each for appropriate plugs.
Cool. I have probably 150m of cat5e and a 305m UTP cat6 box, with suitable jacks for both. Was just wondering if there's any reason I should use the cat5e instead.
 

nad_isa

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Cool. I have probably 150m of cat5e and a 305m UTP cat6 box, with suitable jacks for both. Was just wondering if there's any reason I should use the cat5e instead.
depends on the use case. i used cat5e for my security cams (over enough bandwidth) and in most cases cat5e should be sufficient unless you are moving really large files or dealing with gb and higher speeds.

other than price and as per previous posts not much - but you say you have the cable so yeh you good :thumbsup:
 

Messugga

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depends on the use case. i used cat5e for my security cams (over enough bandwidth) and in most cases cat5e should be sufficient unless you are moving really large files or dealing with gb and higher speeds.

other than price and as per previous posts not much - but you say you have the cable so yeh you good :thumbsup:
Gigabit is gigabit. Cat5e is going to perform at gigabit speeds at distances of up to 100m, the same as cat6, since that's what it is rated for.

First time I've heard any suggestion that cable type will affect transfer performance depending on file size.

Cat6 is required for 10gbit. That's it. Nothing else.

The only reason not to use cat6 for everything is it's a chunk more expensive than Cat5e.
 

nad_isa

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Gigabit is gigabit. Cat5e is going to perform at gigabit speeds at distances of up to 100m, the same as cat6, since that's what it is rated for.

First time I've heard any suggestion that cable type will affect transfer performance depending on file size.

Cat6 is required for 10gbit. That's it. Nothing else.

The only reason not to use cat6 for everything is it's a chunk more expensive than Cat5e.
:thumbsup: I mentioned it depends on the use case. if you moving large files around internally on your network (e.g. video editing etc between/to file servers) 1G Base-T vs 10G base-T will make a difference in transfer performance accross your network (bearing in mind your devices are setup that way. in most cases it wont for the average person.
 

Messugga

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:thumbsup: I mentioned it depends on the use case. if you moving large files around internally on your network (e.g. video editing etc between/to file servers) 1G Base-T vs 10G base-T will make a difference in transfer performance accross your network (bearing in mind your devices are setup that way. in most cases it wont for the average person.
So if you're running a 10gbps network it'll be faster than a 1gbps network. Very insightful.
 

nad_isa

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So if you're running a 10gbps network it'll be faster than a 1gbps network. Very insightful.
dude he asked what the difference will be for the cables used and i stated my opinion - if you don't like what i'm saying no need to be condescending.
 

Papa Smurf

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Sweet Jesus :oops:
My ethernet cables are from what I brought back from UK in May 2000.
Is that why my computers are so slow between each other at home?
My router has 4 x 1 Gb port inputs.

Is my cable Cat5 ?
 

nad_isa

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Sweet Jesus :oops:
My ethernet cables are from what I brought back from UK in May 2000.
Is that why my computers are so slow between each other at home?
My router has 4 x 1 Gb port inputs.

Is my cable Cat5 ?
you really asking :)

what speed are your network cards? i didnt know my one pc was slow as it had a 10/100 nic at one point.
 

Geoff.D

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I can't believe such a basic matter has the members of an IT forum all gripped in a lack of knowledge!

Does no one understand the differences between cat5, cat5e, cat6 and cat6a cables?
And then to see those that should know better having a cat fight as well.

Come on guys get real please.
 
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deweyzeph

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Just my 2 cents, the quality of the cable makes a huge difference. I bought a TP-Link EAP245 access point a few months ago. It's powered by POE so you obviously just have to run one cable to it from a POE injector or a POE switch. I had some old CAT5E cable lying around so I cobbled together a cable with some old CAT5E connectors that was only about 10m long. No matter what I did I could not get the access point to connect at 1Gbps to my POE switch. It would only connect at 100Mbps. I checked the cable, I tested the connectors, everything was fine. I knew the AP was 1Gbps capable, because that's why I bought it. So I was on the verge of returning it when I thought, let me get some CAT6 cable and connectors. So I bought a whole roll of CAT6 cable and some new CAT6 RJ45 connectors, built the cable, and lo and behold the AP connected at 1Gbps to the POE switch.

Moral of the story, CAT5E does not always work on 1Gbps, even on a short run of 10m and especially if you're running POE through it. I could only get 1Gbps speeds with POE with a CAT6 cable.
 

yogidabear

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Jan 20, 2011
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Moral of the story, CAT5E does not always work on 1Gbps, even on a short run of 10m and especially if you're running POE through it. I could only get 1Gbps speeds with POE with a CAT6 cable.
Whatever you had must be really terrible quality, but unfortunately there is a lot of that around. Cat5e most people call cat5, as besides papa smurf there is no cat5 being used, and they havent manufactured it for about 20 years. It started out as 24AWG which is 0.51mm diameter copper cores. Then to save a buck they made 0.49mm, still ok technically, then 0.45mm not ok for most cases. Then they made copper coated aluminium, and again it comes in various thicknesses. Even the quality of the PVC on the cores and outer sheath can affect performance, and installation. In Cat6 you have the same story.

Properly installed 0.51mm copper Cat5e on 10M would have given you Gigabit and the necessary PoE, yet it didnt, so now its garbage. It irritates me people flood the market with inferior products, make it difficult for consumers, and create waste.
 

deweyzeph

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Whatever you had must be really terrible quality, but unfortunately there is a lot of that around. Cat5e most people call cat5, as besides papa smurf there is no cat5 being used, and they havent manufactured it for about 20 years. It started out as 24AWG which is 0.51mm diameter copper cores. Then to save a buck they made 0.49mm, still ok technically, then 0.45mm not ok for most cases. Then they made copper coated aluminium, and again it comes in various thicknesses. Even the quality of the PVC on the cores and outer sheath can affect performance, and installation. In Cat6 you have the same story.

Properly installed 0.51mm copper Cat5e on 10M would have given you Gigabit and the necessary PoE, yet it didnt, so now its garbage. It irritates me people flood the market with inferior products, make it difficult for consumers, and create waste.
You're absolutely right, the old cat5e stuff was no-name garbage. In theory it should have worked but it didn't. The new cat6 cable I've got is definitely better quality though.
 

AsianSpaceman

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May 9, 2019
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Just to update this post, went with the 30m cat6 cable since it was on special for like R150 on takealot. Got the trunking up and cable is in. Getting my full speed, no drops or problems with the cable itself.

Next step is im looking at getting a little 4 port switch just to add some flexibility.

Thanks for the help community :)
 
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