Recommend a WiFi Router/Solution please.

Mars

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My old TP-link TD-W8970 V1 is dated and I'm struggling to get proper wifi coverage over my whole house. I also have a second router (same model) that I'm using to provide wifi to the other end of my house.
I tried to get it to extend my current wifi, but that did not work so now I have two networks :/
On top of that, some android devices suddenly have no internet access while connected to these routers. They work everywhere else but not with these two.

Without spending too much money, how can I have a consistent strong network all over my house? How do I work out the range of the router?

Another option is openwrt, but that looks like a massive learning curve. I may try it anyway, but I'm not sure that should be the first option.
 

das Toktokken

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The easiest (less tech) route is to just spend a bit more money and go with a mesh solution like Ubiquiti Unifi.
My experience with legacy stuff is that it's always recommended to connect all WiFi access points to a single switch with Cat 5E / 6 cable, so that there's no bottleneck with repeating, also make sure you only have a single DHCP server set up across all the devices. Only one device must hand out IP addresses - this would usually be your main router connected to whatever WAN / Internet connection you have.

I have a mix and match of new and old gadgets. I prefer different SSIDs as I like to know which WiFi access point device the phone or laptop has latched on to, but they all operate on the same IP range and there's only one device handing out IP addresses. You give each access point it's own static IP from .1 (your main router) to .10. You then set up DHCP to hand out client addresses starting at .100. My other static devices (home security, printer) are all in the range .5-.10
 

SauRoNZA

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https://www.takealot.com/ubiquiti-unifi-802-11ac-long-range-access-point/PLID40890861

Buy one and plan to buy another down the line for failover / load balancing.

You'll never have Wifi issues again.

And if you think that is "expensive" then you'll continue to suffer with cheap crap that fails year after year and costs you more over time.

OpenWRT doesn't solve the hardware limitation so don't expect magical signal difference just because you changed the software. Unless the software limited the transmit power for some reason.
 

das Toktokken

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OpenWRT doesn't solve the hardware limitation so don't expect magical signal difference just because you changed the software. Unless the software limited the transmit power for some reason.
This, you still need a decent router / wifi point.
Also, whatever you get, get an AC capable point - AC1700 or higher preferably. AC is much faster (5Ghz). I put all the phones and low bandwidth requirement devices on 2.4Ghz and run the PCs and media centers on 5Ghz.
 

Mars

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Ok, so assuming I get one of those and a decent router. Which one?

So I'm looking at about 5k for a decent sollution
 

das Toktokken

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