Remove rust from a potjie?

Stefanmuller

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#1
I have neglected my potjie a bit, so it got all orange on the inside bottom from rust. I have used it a few times before. I proceeded to scrub it with hot water and soap using steel wool and a hard brush. Got off most of it but there are still a few spots that wont get off. It looks clean but every time I rinse it and scrub some more, the water in the potjie turns dark. Can I use Coke or something, or should I not worry if there isn't real obvious rust left?
 

Hemi300c

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#4
Bicarb and boiling water - let it soak - remember the mixture will foam like ENO's.

Then wash dry and if clean coat with sunflower / olive oil.
 

bwana

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#6
Keep going at it with steel wool or wire brush - you'll want to season it again when you're done.

Be careful what oil you use to protect it - olive oil and sunflower oil will quickly become rancid. My personal preference is lard or even bacon fat.
 
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ponder

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#8
Get one of those scouring attachments for a drill, they're made from a artificial material.
 

The_Unbeliever

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#9
For proper long-term storage :

Wash portjie properly.
Dry it properly
Then coat the inside liberally with sunflower oil, and put some newspapers in as well. Newspapers will absorb moisture etc.
 

HavocXphere

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#10
Reason I mentioned that is I was told that's how you prep it for first time use.
I think thats the remove any residual crap that might be on the surface from manufacturing.

Be careful what oil you use to protect it - olive oil and sunflower oil will quickly become rancid. My personal preference is lard or even bacon fat.
True. Rancid animal fat seems nastier to me than rancid vegetable fat though. Isn't there something that doesn't go off easily yet is edible...some kind of pure mineral oil perhaps?
 

Stefanmuller

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#11
For proper long-term storage :

Wash portjie properly.
Dry it properly
Then coat the inside liberally with sunflower oil, and put some newspapers in as well. Newspapers will absorb moisture etc.
I usually do this, but forgot. That brush drill bit sounds good (pricey) otherwise I will do the bicarb thing. As long as it is not poisonous to have a bit of rust.
 

bwana

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#12
I think thats the remove any residual crap that might be on the surface from manufacturing.


True. Rancid animal fat seems nastier to me than rancid vegetable fat though. Isn't there something that doesn't go off easily yet is edible...some kind of pure mineral oil perhaps?
True - a properly seasoned pot won't rust though and the lard/animal fat makes for a good basis for the seasoning process. I've got pots and pans that I haven't used in years that don't have a speck of rust.
 

Stefanmuller

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#13
True - a properly seasoned pot won't rust though and the lard/animal fat makes for a good basis for the seasoning process. I've got pots and pans that I haven't used in years that don't have a speck of rust.
As soon as the pot dries there is rust appearing again. I have some bicarb which I will try now, dry it quickly afterwards and smear it with one of those lard blocks that looks like a block of butter?
 

bwana

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#14
As soon as the pot dries there is rust appearing again. I have some bicarb which I will try now, dry it quickly afterwards and smear it with one of those lard blocks that looks like a block of butter?
Sounds like an unseasoned pot. Try something like this - http://www.wikihow.com/Season-Cast-Iron-Cookware

For new pots I like to boil root vegetables or soup bones and then go through the seasoning process. Not sure of the reason behind it but that's how my dad seasoned his.

EDIT - seasoning might sound like a lot of effort but it's worth it.
 

LazyLion

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#15
For proper long-term storage :

Wash portjie properly.
Dry it properly
Then coat the inside liberally with sunflower oil, and put some newspapers in as well. Newspapers will absorb moisture etc.
This, and I would add that you probably have to repeat the process every 4 to 6 months to see that the oil has not solidified.
When you want to use it again, bring it to a boil with some water and dish washing liquid first, then rinse before use.
 

Stefanmuller

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#16
Sounds like an unseasoned pot. Try something like this - http://www.wikihow.com/Season-Cast-Iron-Cookware

For new pots I like to boil root vegetables or soup bones and then go through the seasoning process. Not sure of the reason behind it but that's how my dad seasoned his.

EDIT - seasoning might sound like a lot of effort but it's worth it.
I did that when I got the pot and almost puked. Anyway, potjie is on the fire. Already fried some onions in oil, took it out and browned some lamb. Put the onion back in with chopped tomato and mixed peppers and a dash of red wine. Simmering away as we speak.

The bicarb really seemed to do the trick. There was no brown colouring in the oil when I did the onions, so hopefully I wont die. If you dont hear from me later....
 

cbrunsdonza

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#18
Reason I mentioned that is I was told that's how you prep it for first time use.
Actually the best way to prep is to make a burning man style fire and then place it upside down on the flames. It burns the protective, fatty treatment away and after a quick rinse your pot is good to go. I got this info from Cadac and broke two potjies in with this method.

My dad and I tried the old school way and it took us about 5 attempts before we could use the pot. The Cadac method allowed me to use the pot same day.

As for the rust, I think elbow grease and preventive care is the only real answer.
 

cbrunsdonza

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#19
Keep going at it with steel wool or wire brush - you'll want to season it again when you're done.

Be careful what oil you use to protect it - olive oil and sunflower oil will quickly become rancid. My personal preference is lard or even bacon fat.
Biggest mistake is to use olive oil as 90% of people do not know the difference between the different types and use Extra Virgin oil for cooking. I've found that canola oil works the best for cooking and treating the pot but I should actually get some lard (never thought of that)
 

Stefanmuller

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#20
Actually the best way to prep is to make a burning man style fire and then place it upside down on the flames. It burns the protective, fatty treatment away and after a quick rinse your pot is good to go. I got this info from Cadac and broke two potjies in with this method.

My dad and I tried the old school way and it took us about 5 attempts before we could use the pot. The Cadac method allowed me to use the pot same day.

As for the rust, I think elbow grease and preventive care is the only real answer.
In my opinion, the old school way only made it worse. That first method makes sense. I also heard that these days potjies are good to go out of the store. Maybe just a soap wash and there you go.

Mushroom and broccoli in. So almost done. There are also some beans put in there after the potatoes. Hopefully this will not be the end of my world.
 
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