Sonoff SV wiring

crudler

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May 20, 2008
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Hi,
I have played a lot with different sonoff devices, but this is my first attempt at a Sonoff SV which unlike the otheres requires some soldering.

I took an old 12v power supply (confirmed it does work), chopped it's head off (shame) and did an attempt to solder them into the IN lines of the sonoff.

I am not an sparky, IU am a software guy, so this is unchartered territory for me.

When I plug my power supply into the wall, it looks like my SV isnt drawing any juice. no lights coming on etc

Did I do something wrong? Is my attempt at soldering too shoddy?

thanks!
 

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That's the 220V connection.

The 12V connection is the two pins on the right where it says 5~24V with the -/+ next to the pins.

But before you carry on what are you trying to achieve with the SV?
 
i thought the SV could only take < 30v. and the two inputs were a choice of solder or jumper
my plan was to wire one of these lights to the output
IDS Bright High Power Alarm Status Indicator LED Light
and then activate the sonoff from my HA system based on certain sensors


i can try hook them up to the jumper instead - i have some female to female jumpers - i could cut and solder
 

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Hi,
I have played a lot with different sonoff devices, but this is my first attempt at a Sonoff SV which unlike the otheres requires some soldering.

I took an old 12v power supply (confirmed it does work), chopped it's head off (shame) and did an attempt to solder them into the IN lines of the sonoff.

I am not an sparky, IU am a software guy, so this is unchartered territory for me.

When I plug my power supply into the wall, it looks like my SV isnt drawing any juice. no lights coming on etc

Did I do something wrong? Is my attempt at soldering too shoddy?

thanks!
did you check the polarity of your soldered wires ?
 
did you check the polarity of your soldered wires ?
obviously not. HAHAHAAHA
does polarity matter? also (excuse the noob question) the wires are both the same colour, how do i test polarity?
I do have a multimeter if that helps
 
There should be some white dashes on one of the wires. That's generally the positive ( on some RPi power supplies, the dashes are negative )

<edit> On surface value, it looks like the polarity is indeed reversed
 
Last edited:
obviously not. HAHAHAAHA
does polarity matter? also (excuse the noob question) the wires are both the same colour, how do i test polarity?
I do have a multimeter if that helps
There is normally a drawing indicating the polarity of the jack. When I go Macguyver like you did, I cut open the jack, to know which wire is positive and which is negative, then mark the wires.
 
thanks guys! appreciate the help.
Assuming thats the issue - which is very possibly is - what are the odds that i fried my board ?
 
I do have a multimeter if that helps
Easy, connect your multimeter and set it to DC voltage mode. Testing both leads from the power supply make sure your probes are wired correctly to the meter (Red->Pos Black->Neg), if the reading on your meter reads a negative value then you have them reversed.
 
There is normally a drawing indicating the polarity of the jack. When I go Macguyver like you did, I cut open the jack, to know which wire is positive and which is negative, then mark the wires.
could only aim to be as cool as Macguyver one day!
out of interest, had i aimd to be less Macguyver, and more like someone who does this properly, how should i have tackled the problem? what parts am I missing, could have ordered etc? Learning.....
 
could only aim to be as cool as Macguyver one day!
out of interest, had i aimd to be less Macguyver, and more like someone who does this properly, how should i have tackled the problem? what parts am I missing, could have ordered etc? Learning.....
do you have an old speaker laying around
 
There should be some white dashes on one of the wires. That's generally the positive ( on some RPi power supplies, the dashes are negative )

<edit> On surface value, it looks like the polarity is indeed reversed
:eek: White dashes are generally negative not positive
 
could only aim to be as cool as Macguyver one day!
out of interest, had i aimd to be less Macguyver, and more like someone who does this properly, how should i have tackled the problem? what parts am I missing, could have ordered etc? Learning.....
My Macguyver days was before me owning a multimeter. If you have a multimeter, then @DrJohnZoidberg post is the one to follow. I assumed you did not have one.
 
To add, I was talking about this image on power supplies:
1713362462204.png

Note the positive and negative orientation of the jack.
 
oo, never noticed that. does that mean the wire follow that polarity if i follow them (with the back of the jack facing up like your photo)
Only when you cut the jack open, will you see which wire is soldiered to which section.

Source: me cutting open jacks.
 
Only when you cut the jack open, will you see which wire is soldiered to which section.

Source: me cutting open jacks.
lekker thanks. learnt a lot from this post thanks guys
 
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:eek: White dashes are generally negative not positive
Some random googles


I've repurposed a few adapters this way and the white dashes have always been positive. I've only ever seen mention of some original Raspberry Pi PSU's where the dashes have been negative
 
Some random googles


I've repurposed a few adapters this way and the white dashes have always been positive. I've only ever seen mention of some original Raspberry Pi PSU's where the dashes have been negative
wow i guess I've always gotten the odd ones, i've never (to memory) gotten one that was a positive
 
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