SQL: Let your heart and SQL out here

rustypup

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Jan 28, 2016
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Absolutely suggested for most dev's to have passing experience with SQL. For my part, especially if they can grasp the security* aspect, maybe even some time spent in configuration.

Also, proper indexing and how to avoid parameter sniffing.

I would learn it together with Azure
Azure SQL has some interesting tricks. Alongside this I'd also say Cosmos and maybe some of the ML stuff which is now within easy reach. All much needed skills

/*Because the next time I get a "requirements" document that insists bog standard users should be DBO I'm going to burn everything to the ground and take up fishing.
 

Rocket-Boy

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Joined
Jul 31, 2007
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8,308
I would learn it together with Azure


I am very keen on Azure Devops

If I was getting into anything new right now it would be Devops related for sure.
I do a lot of Devops type stuff already but there are so many new products available that its becoming quite a wide field.
 

axsis

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Joined
Mar 14, 2012
Messages
318
pfft just use an ORM :p.

My sql is pretty bad, I can get by but it's like 'thinking backwards' for me. xD
 

Ancalagon

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Feb 23, 2010
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16,837
I've worked with nearly all of the major databases over the years - I quite like them for some reason.

SQL Server - always been amazing and keeps getting better. Once you get used to SQL Servers system for managing databases, schemas and users, its difficult to switch to anything else.
IBM DB2 - handles line terminators really badly, which makes it difficult to write a script to create a stored procedure, for example. This is much harder than it needs to be! But it has decent querying capabilities. This was an old version of DB2, maybe this is easier now.
PostgreSQL - you can't switch databases during a user session as easily as you can with SQL Server, which I find weird. Not much experience with it otherwise.
Oracle - Only worked with older Oracle databases like 11 and 12, but man they are BACKWARDS! Especially Oracle 11, which is just bizarre in how it works.
 

scudsucker

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Oct 16, 2006
Messages
5,709
Add NoSQL
Don't waste your time.

The realistic use case for non-relational data is vanishingly small; on the rare occasion when you do bump into one, a NoSQL solution is trivial to implement.

And, really, why bother? Postgres has native JSON data types: best of both worlds.
 

schuits

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Mar 7, 2013
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1,538
I'm not so sure about having only SQL as a skill set. Unless you find a really large company, and even then the lack of diversity would bore me.
Unless you become a full on DBA?
 

Gozzy

Senior Member
Joined
Jan 25, 2004
Messages
661
You can't go wrong, had I know what I knew now I would have gotten into it from the start...most of my career we dealt with MS SQL with the odd Oracle SQL, which is a good starting point as most companies I came across use mostly MS SQL, which may indicate a starting point to you.
 

Claymore

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Jan 20, 2004
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7,728
There's a big demand for people who know SQL, especially at bigger companies (we've lost 3 of our team of 4 in our area recently, we badly need replacements). Apart from being a full time DBA, there are options in MI and BI, specific solutions (Sharepoint, MS Dynamics), and development.
 

Solarion

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Nov 14, 2012
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19,261
Please could one of you point me in the right direction. Need something free just for home use. Is the Developer Edition what I'm looking for?

 

poffle

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Apr 21, 2007
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5,458
SQL is awesome! There are so many different aspects to databases that most don't realise, nor how much it is actually used in companies (literally everywhere in everything).

If you looking into it, find out what you want to do with it, you get the administration side of things; making sure the installations are good, databases are created for maximum performance, security, backup & recovery.
You get the SQL Development (which is more fun for me personally) side, which is mainly writing actual SQL code to do lots n lots of things and how to make **** fast!

Current company working with 2TB databases and ingesting like 5000 rows of data per second, gets fun trying to optimize that!

As for picking a flavour.. ya its hard. I used to be die hard MSSQL, recently been working with PostgreSQL and its bloody awesome, both have pros n cons and both are fantastic. Oracle is just oracle, expensive and you need a freaking guru with 100years experience just to set up your DB else it runs likes a snail. MySQL is rubbish.

Then of course you now have the "big data" trend... whole other ball game and host of technologies.

On a job note, Its extremely hard to find proper competent SQL Developers :(

Edit: And i wish software engineers knew more SQL! Even just advanced "basics" like what and index is and why you should use it :(
 
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SlinkyMike

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Jan 23, 2006
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6,403
Don't waste your time.

The realistic use case for non-relational data is vanishingly small; on the rare occasion when you do bump into one, a NoSQL solution is trivial to implement.

And, really, why bother? Postgres has native JSON data types: best of both worlds.
Agree strongly with the bolded point and I should add that I have seen several projects that went NoSQL eventually have to go Kimball and build dimensional models, etc. anyway due to performance issues. It has its place but rather focus on SQL skills, then learn data modeling.
 
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