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US politics general thread

cerebus

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
31,665
I actually don’t recall a specific thread for US politics at that time? Can you point me to it?

The problem is this thread is called US politics but it’s all about conservatives, no balance at all and speak volumes of the agendas people are pushing.
No balance? I just did a quick count on that page of the thread, and there were 8 pro-right posts and 8 pro-left, assuming that you're right-leaning. Perhaps you're just incensed by the fact that all the news about the right-wing right now is not good, but if you have good news to post, feel free.
 

NarrowBandFtw

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 1, 2008
Messages
12,031
That's absolute nonsense. Antifa are extremists but there's a moral chasm between them and neo-nazis.

Put it this way: if Antifa had their way what would happen? Neo-nazis and white supremacists would be disenfranchised and wouldn't be able to hold marches without fear of retaliation.
Oh so that is why they carry firearms to protests, those are merely weapons of disenfranchisement? Phew that's a relief, thought they were planning to shoot people.
 

konfab

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
16,555
Judged by that standard, Monday night's announcement of Kavanaugh's nomination to the high court was an utterly normal moment. It was a Republican president seeking to fill a vacancy on the Supreme Court with a consummate conservative — with a man who might have been nominated by Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, George W. Bush, John McCain, Mitt Romney, or Marco Rubio. That's why every faction on the right was at least satisfied and most were giddy as the president announced his pick from the East Room of the White House.

Yet the liberal response — from Hollywood to New York to Washington — was anything but normal. Or rather, it was the new normal of responding to everything the Trump administration does as if it were truly alarming, and perhaps even definitive proof that the imminent end of democracy is at hand. To wit:
http://theweek.com/articles/783963/liberal-freakout-over-brett-kavanaugh-not-helping
 

crackersa

Honorary Master
Joined
May 31, 2011
Messages
29,033

Alan

Honorary Master
Joined
Sep 30, 2005
Messages
61,330
Same kind of polls that predicted a Hilary win lol. Wortless. Might as well add a 15% margin either way.
In a new Harvard/Harris poll released this week exclusively to The Hill, President Trump’s overall approval rating rose to 47 percent, just two points shy of the highest level of his presidency, per that survey. The main driver of his growing popularity now: a stunning 10 percent rise in Trump approval among Hispanics.
:twisted:

https://www.realclearpolitics.com/a...oval_rating_rises_among_hispanics_137382.html
 

konfab

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 23, 2008
Messages
16,555
That's absolute nonsense. Antifa are extremists but there's a moral chasm between them and neo-nazis.

Put it this way: if Antifa had their way what would happen? Neo-nazis and white supremacists would be disenfranchised and wouldn't be able to hold marches without fear of retaliation. I don't support that, because I believe in freedom of expression.
If neo-nazis had their way what would happen? Blacks, Jews, gays and other minorities would be exterminated or segregated.

You cannot compare them in degrees of scummery.
There is a little bit of a problem though. The neo-nazis and white superemacists can't actually do much. If you wanted to segregate and exterminate all non white people, you would need the government support. That is simply not going to happen. So they are limited to roughly the same things that antifa can do.

If you actually wanted what Antifa would want if they had the same power as you are ascribing to neo-nazis, it would be communism and gulags. Which would target anyone who they perceive to have "privilege". This is why they have no problem throwing molotovs at gay Jews like Milo.
 

rietrot

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 26, 2016
Messages
8,754

Unhappy438

Honorary Master
Joined
May 25, 2011
Messages
16,813
There is a little bit of a problem though. The neo-nazis and white superemacists can't actually do much. If you wanted to segregate and exterminate all non white people, you would need the government support. That is simply not going to happen. So they are limited to roughly the same things that antifa can do.

If you actually wanted what Antifa would want if they had the same power as you are ascribing to neo-nazis, it would be communism and gulags. Which would target anyone who they perceive to have "privilege". This is why they have no problem throwing molotovs at gay Jews like Milo.
You're right, Antifa holds heavy anticapalist views which probably resembles close to Stalins Russia. The antifa actists are just as abhorrent as the Nazis.
 

Randhir

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 4, 2007
Messages
25,503
I actually don’t recall a specific thread for US politics at that time? Can you point me to it?
Oh lord, just go through Alan's post/thread history. That should keep you busy for a few days. He probably blames Obama for an upset stomach and Venezuela for headaches.
 

OrbitalDawn

Ulysses Everett McGill
Joined
Aug 26, 2011
Messages
39,491
What a bizarre argument. I started writing why I think so, but found that Matt Yglesias spells it out very well.

Brett Kavanaugh and the fatal weakness of normcore politics. He’s a very normal Republican pick — that’s the problem

Donald Trump is not a normal president or, indeed, a normal person. But on Monday he did pick a normal conservative jurist to nominate to the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh.

There’s something reassuring, perhaps, for liberals in this boring pick, even if they disagree with Kavanaugh’s positions. Perhaps a “normal” pick is a sign that American politics and government might be able to return to some semblance of functional democracy.

Under this mindset, the problem is Trump. He is at the center of American norms slippage. If he changes America changes. But that effort to place Trump’s sheer aberrancy at the center of American public life — a trend I’ve dubbed normcore politics — suffers from critical weaknesses. The fact that Kavanaugh is normal underscores how real the risk is to democracy. It doesn’t mitigate it.

The attacks on norms that many fear will outlast Trump’s presidency started long before he took office. And Kavanaugh supports them. His positions pose an immediate threat to voting rights and democratic regulation of the economy. They validate the years-long sequence of norm-shredding maneuvers by Mitch McConnell and total abdication of congressional oversight responsibilities that have brought us to this point. Normal is as bad as not normal, or even worse.

But if you insist on viewing all of politics primarily through the lens of normal vs. not normal, you willfully blind yourself to the real threat.

...

The norm-shattering blockade of Merrick Garland’s nomination was “politics as usual” in the sense that it was unanimously agreed to by Republican Party senators. And the replacement of Anthony Kennedy by a much-more-conservative jurist who will substantially shift American public policy to the right is “politics as usual” in the sense that any Republican president would do the same.

Indeed, the entire Kavanaugh cycle from working for Ken Starr to working on the Bush v. Gore case to ensure that the popular vote loser would take office regardless to his ruling in favor of large-scale disenfranchisement in South Carolina is very normal.

More broadly, the Kavanaugh view that the Constitution grants powerless individuals little in terms of democratic participation but powerful interests much in terms of exemption from regulation is a very normal Federalist Society view.

But that’s exactly the problem. The American constitutional order is very robust against any effort by an eccentric madman to build a personalized dictatorship. But it’s very vulnerable to the efforts of a disciplined minority to entrench itself in power.

...

A great many Republicans — including many in Congress and many of his own appointees — find this or that aspect of Trump’s conduct to be regrettable on one or more levels. But the party has, as a whole, made a collective and unanimous decision that they are all on the same team and fighting for the same cause. It’s a cause they’ve given up on securing majority support for, but believe can be effectively advanced through gerrymandering, filibusters, judicial review, vote suppression, cable news propaganda, etc. It’s high time to take them at their word that, all things considered, they think this is a good way to go.

Putting Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court is very normal Republican politics, and that’s exactly the problem.
In addition to the above, he's hostile to the separation of church & state, and thinks the police should basically be able to do what they want, with the rights of victims of police abuses being far too lenient.
 
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