Vodacom CEO explains why mobile data expires

supersunbird

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#41
Please come here to Taiwan and explain that to the mobile operators. True uncapped LTE-A mobile data is par for the course here at around R220-R450 a month.

They obviously have no idea what they doing here. Lol.
What type of TV signal is being broadcast there... analogue or digital?
 

jannievanzyl

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#42
It's clear that many people don't understand the science of radio waves.
For a normal user it makes sense to equate a point-to-multipoint wireless connection with a point-to-point fixed line. After all, they both connect you to the internet. And often the mobile connection is faster as well.

Just think how cool it would be if there was a "Jannie" or "Supersunbird" dedicated pipe in the sky. Maybe one day with 7G :)
 

whatwhat

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#43
What type of TV signal is being broadcast there... analogue or digital?
You get television over cable or fiber, its part of your all in one package. Mine is around R800-900 a month for 1GB fibre and all the TV channels (HBO, etc.).

There is no extra ISP cost or any form of shaping/throttling.
 

jannievanzyl

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#44
Please come here to Taiwan and explain that to the mobile operators. True uncapped LTE-A mobile data is par for the course here at around R220-R450 a month.

They obviously have no idea what they doing here. Lol.
Rain also tried it. You think they stopped it because it seemed like a cool thing to do?

The physics are the physics. Irrespective if you agree with it or not. Or try and force a commercial model onto it.

But I'd be keen to see how much spectrum these TW MNO's use for how many subs. Do you have some links?
 

supersunbird

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#45
You get television over cable or fiber, its part of your all in one package. Mine is around R800-900 a month for 1GB fibre and all the TV channels (HBO, etc.).

There is no extra ISP cost or any form of shaping/throttling.
Ah, so tons of spectrum available. Thanks for answering the question and explaining the SA problem in one go, which answers your question.
 

Speedster

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#46
Vodacom net profit last year was only R15.6 billion (R15 600 000 000). Obviously they can't afford to have bundles roll over.
 

whatwhat

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#47
Rain also tried it. You think they stopped it because it seemed like a cool thing to do?

The physics are the physics. Irrespective if you agree with it or not. Or try and force a commercial model onto it.

But I'd be keen to see how much spectrum these TW MNO's use for how many subs. Do you have some links?
https://www.ncc.gov.tw/english/content.aspx?site_content_sn=366

Think there is around 30 million subscribers, as there is only about 24 million people on the island. It's obviously not as big as South Africa so coverage is easier, and many people have multiple providers.
 

jannievanzyl

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#48
https://www.ncc.gov.tw/english/content.aspx?site_content_sn=366

Think there is around 30 million subscribers, as there is only about 24 million people on the island. It's obviously not as big as South Africa so coverage is easier, and many people have multiple providers.
Do you know how much spectrum they have?

Would love to roll out a network in a place like TW. Basically the SA population in an area the size of the Kruger Park. But you would still need a LOT of spectrum to do it.
 

Johnatan56

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#49
I know you guys desperately want to argue the point. And I fully agree it should be that unused data should never expire, it just feels like it should never expire, right?. BTW, one can easily build a commercial construct where it does not, like electricity. But we need to consider what it does to pricing.

The point I'm making - and it's just a fact of physics - is that data is a service, not a product. Comparing it to products (you can store) feels correct but the correct definition is of a service. If you use or don't use the service, the capacity was available.

The one analogy that works well is that of a parking garage where there is predefined capacity and you get access to it for a monthly fee, irrespective if you actually used it or not.

As someone mentioned above, the correct application for a data service should actually be an uncapped service (like it used to be in the days when you bought a line speed, not a bucket of data), but that is constrained by the limited capacity of wireless technology. Just ask Rain. :)
Then why don't/haven't you?

The price you charge is way above quite a few competitors, don't you think that reducing pricing will increase sales substantially? Or do you think you've already tapped out the market?

Do you know how much spectrum they have?

Would love to roll out a network in a place like TW. Basically the SA population in an area the size of the Kruger Park. But you would still need a LOT of spectrum to do it.
Can't really do that. I bet a vast majority of subscribers are in the cities, just launch an uncapped package type thing only valid within cities/4G.
Of course this would completely destroy your pricing model of high prices for little data.
 

f2wohf

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#51
Hear you.

But, as explained above, I don't think mobile networks lend themselves to uncapped. Fixed Wireless on ISM spectrum? Now we're talking. ;)
Have you been to the US, Europe, Asia where uncapped is rather the norm?

https://www.t-mobile.com/offers/essentials-unlimited-plan
http://mobile.free.fr/
https://www.hk.chinamobile.com/en/corporate_information/Service_Plans/

Do you know that with my french operator, for 19.99€ a month, I get free calls from South Africa (so while roaming) to France, US, Canada and China, free calls on landlines of over 100 countries AND 25Go of data IN South Africa? In addition of everything uncapped when I’m in France.

http://mobile.free.fr/fiche-forfait-free.html

Only the 25Go would cost me more here...

So tell me how they do? You could at least give reasonable excuses (low ARPU in SA, vast country with low density warranting more and less used BTS, spectrum...) justifying an extra cost for SA. Instead, you come with a blatantly wrong assumption.
 

quovadis

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#52
Well at least it wasn’t an article about “blended” cost. However my 2c would be as follows... most Fibre/DSL providers are able to provide capped data around R1-R2 per GB - most mobile providers provide this as R50-R150 per GB - that’s a helluva margin (R49-R148) for the wireless access portion.
 

Johnatan56

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#53
Do you know how much spectrum they have?

Would love to roll out a network in a place like TW. Basically the SA population in an area the size of the Kruger Park. But you would still need a LOT of spectrum to do it.
Well at least it wasn’t an article about “blended” cost. However my 2c would be as follows... most Fibre/DSL providers are able to provide capped data around R1-R2 per GB - most mobile providers provide this as R50-R150 per GB - that’s a helluva margin (R49-R148) for the wireless access portion.
Spectrum cost. Also, cheaper if higher GB.

The margin is really, really high as well though.
 

supersunbird

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#54
Well at least it wasn’t an article about “blended” cost. However my 2c would be as follows... most Fibre/DSL providers are able to provide capped data around R1-R2 per GB - most mobile providers provide this as R50-R150 per GB - that’s a helluva margin (R49-R148) for the wireless access portion.
There is a reason cellular providers are big on the stock exchange and paying nice dividends...
 

jannievanzyl

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#56
Well at least it wasn’t an article about “blended” cost. However my 2c would be as follows... most Fibre/DSL providers are able to provide capped data around R1-R2 per GB - most mobile providers provide this as R50-R150 per GB - that’s a helluva margin (R49-R148) for the wireless access portion.
And mobility. That's the big one.

But prices will come down. As it has been, year on year, for two decades.
 

quovadis

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#57
Do you know how much spectrum they have?

Would love to roll out a network in a place like TW. Basically the SA population in an area the size of the Kruger Park. But you would still need a LOT of spectrum to do it.
Facts matter. Gauteng has higher population density than Taiwan - you’ve been having it ...
 

3Gee

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#58
The networks will always find an excuse when exorbitant data charges and limits are mentioned

Give them the spectrum they always moaning about and they will come up with maintenance, infrastructure and
new technology, 5/6/7/8G costs.
 

isie

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#59
I know you guys desperately want to argue the point. And I fully agree it should be that unused data should never expire, it just feels like it should never expire, right?. BTW, one can easily build a commercial construct where it does not, like electricity. But we need to consider what it does to pricing.



The point I'm making - and it's just a fact of physics - is that data is a service, not a product. Comparing it to products (you can store) feels correct but the correct definition is of a service. If you use or don't use the service, the capacity was available.



The one analogy that works well is that of a parking garage where there is predefined capacity and you get access to it for a monthly fee, irrespective if you actually used it or not.



As someone mentioned above, the correct application for a data service should actually be an uncapped service (like it used to be in the days when you bought a line speed, not a bucket of data), but that is constrained by the limited capacity of wireless technology. Just ask Rain. :)
Does airtime expire less then 30 days after purchase?
 
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