VPN - What is a Peering Point

syntax

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Never heard of that exact term before.

I would assume it refers to the points where the vpn terminates. IE the device and more specifically the IP address and interface on each device.
 

Burzum

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A peering point in brief is like this:

Think of your local stub network, local IPs connected to a single access point / a peering point is networks connected to a access point.

Out of curiosity, why are you asking?
 

HavocXphere

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Hi All

What is a Peering Point in a VPN and how do you find/determine it?

Thank you
You connect to the VPN providers server. Usually they have multiple connection points. Essentially the VPN links yourself to this VPN provider via a secure tunnel.

Latin for "that is"
Directly translated "it is", but yes "that is" makes more sense i.t.o. English grammar.

Generally lowercase letters are used though and each word is separated by full stops. i.e. like so <---

Perhaps that is what threw OP off.


btw if any of you are looking into VPNs. Privateinternetaccess now supports bitcoins - tried it & the process is flippin smooth.

Remember also to take care regarding the payment method & personal details. Whilst within SA borders you've got certain laws in your favour that protect you - going via a VPN could potentially expose you to *more* risk if you provide full personal details (since the VPN provider is subject to different laws). PM me if you need more details.
 

Burzum

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Directly translated "it is", but yes "that is" makes more sense i.t.o. English grammar.

It actually means id est "that is" and the correct way to type it (i.e. that is putting them in braces in a sentence to use as an example, is considered standard practice and the formal way.)

;)
 

HavocXphere

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It actually means id est "that is" and the correct way to type it (i.e. that is putting them in braces in a sentence to use as an example, is considered standard practice and the formal way.)

;)
You are out of your depth here. As I said, mine was a direct translation - and directly translated "id" translates to "it" (among other things). Thus my direct translation is 100%.

Pronoun[edit]
id n
it (nominative neuter of is used as subject)
It (accusative neuter of is used as object)

I did concede though that YingYang's version is sufficiently accurate to convey the right meaning in English.

putting them in braces in a sentence to use as an example, is considered standard practice and the formal way
You're Afrikaans, right? I don't think "braces" means what you think it means. The only convention I'm aware of is italicizing foreign words. Only lawyers and economists seem to bother with this though (each favoring specific phrases - lawyers like "inter alia", economists like "ceteris paribus").
 

Burzum

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You are out of your depth here. As I said, mine was a direct translation - and directly translated "id" translates to "it" (among other things). Thus my direct translation is 100%.



I did concede though that YingYang's version is sufficiently accurate to convey the right meaning in English.

What a load of crap.

You're Afrikaans, right? I don't think "braces" means what you think it means.

Nope, but I see you are lolz

If you were adept in proper English, you would know that including i.e. in parentheses is the right way.

Looks like that tide has risen above you here bud.

Only lawyers and economists seem to bother with this though (each favoring specific phrases - lawyers like "inter alia", economists like "ceteris paribus").

rofl? Are you retarded?

People with a good command of the English language use it. Heh...
 
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Paul Hjul

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the shift from VPN to an argument about the use of Latin-isms and their use in economics and law

G(r)eek, Latin and English


Anyway I have never come across a style guide or convention that id est should be in any form of parenthesis and it is definitely the practice in certain US pleadings and reported judgments for "that is" expansions to take the form of a footnote starting with id est (Roman font, not italics). Moreover I have seen (IIRC in Constitutional Court judgments, and probably used in pleadings - of some shape of form) in South African usage a sentence starting: "I.e." where the preceding sentence is fully sufficient and the second sentence really is an elaboration. Although I believe that a better usage would be "Contents_of_Sentence; i.e. ...". As i.e. it is an incorporated term in English whereas most style guides and systems call for an italics font for id est as it is a foreign language term.

Amusingly the classic fights about i.e. have not surfaced here:
(1) To comma, or not to comma, that is the question:
Whether 'tis Nobler for the mind to suffer
The language and customs of the land of outrageous Fortune,
Or to take pens against the lexicons of troubles,

(2) the misuse of i.e. when e.g. is intended
 

Arthur

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Token topic comment: Yes.

Back to off-topic discussion, cat amongst pigeons: Modern practice is increasingly leaning to dropping the stops in common imported abbreviations / contractions. For example, what used to be written as i.e. can be rendered as ie. The Latin exempli gratia, commonly rendered as e.g., can quite acceptably be rendered as eg. Likewise, the normal point terminating the abbreviation for et cetera can also be dropped. So, i.e. written as ie, e.g. as eg, approx. as approx, etc. Just be consistent.

However, it is still not acceptable to use etc to terminate a 'such as' amplification string.
 
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HavocXphere

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What a load of crap.
Nope, but I see you are lolz
If you were adept in proper English, you would know that including i.e. in parentheses is the right way.
Looks like that tide has risen above you here bud.
rofl? Are you retarded?
People with a good command of the English language use it. Heh...
alphabet_soup_cat2.jpg

But yes - apologies to OP for the derail.
 

HavocXphere

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Er, it's "Argument" not "Arguement". :p
sigh yes forgot about that - apparently some people on the internet can't spell. Last time I posted it I added a comment to preempt the correction. Forgot to do so this time round.
 

Paul Hjul

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Er, it's "Argument" not "Arguement". :p
my brother-in-law majored in English and Latin and concurrent to his completing his MA in English read Greek to third year standing. He strongly claims that his study of classics and Elizabethan English caused a deterioration in his spelling. Of course it is still significantly better than mine.

[You should find his thesis of some interest - A critical edition of the poems of Henry Vaux
one of those troublesome recusants in Elizabethan England]

But back to the topic:
You connect to the VPN providers server. Usually they have multiple connection points. Essentially the VPN links yourself to this VPN provider via a secure tunnel.
I've always assumed that VPNs work on an encrypted unicast basis. How do VPN providers maintain multiple connection points?
 

Arthur

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Thanks for the link, Paul. I'm a particular fan of the English Recusants under the Elizabethan police state, starting with the Diamond of England, Edmund Campion, hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn.

Your BIL is right. Modern spellings can differ quite considerably from the Early Modern and particularly Eluzabethan forms. Were we in the 17th C, HavocXphere's "Arguement" would be perfectly acceptable.

(I also have Latin and Greek.)
 

DextrousDave

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A peering point in brief is like this:

Think of your local stub network, local IPs connected to a single access point / a peering point is networks connected to a access point.

Out of curiosity, why are you asking?

Thank you Burzum - It was just a term being thrown around at office and I would just like to be on the same page
 

syntax

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Thank you Burzum - It was just a term being thrown around at office and I would just like to be on the same page

why dont you just ask the people at the office what they mean by the term they are using?

I am constantly in meetings where people love throwing around acronyms or terms. I have no issues asking them to explain the term and what they mean by it.
 

Burzum

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Thank you Burzum - It was just a term being thrown around at office and I would just like to be on the same page


why dont you just ask the people at the office what they mean by the term they are using?

I am constantly in meetings where people love throwing around acronyms or terms. I have no issues asking them to explain the term and what they mean by it.

To many times people like sounding intelligent by using inappropriate terms to describe something.

Last bit of advice for people that don't want to look like idiots:

7-google-logo-style.gif

Use the force, may the google be with you...
 
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