2019 Mazda 3 (Gen 4)

FiestaST

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How does it go with the 1.5 engine? Surely that’s the question people want answered, and not how much boot space there is - you can see that in the brochure. Did he even drive the car?
No disrespect to Alan R but I think you're perhaps asking to much.
 

FiestaST

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REVIEW | Mazda’s 3 gets the basics done

Summary

Mazda really went the extra mile with their new 3 and can one say with certainty that they will add to the six million units that’s already been sold. The car, as a whole, is well-specified and prospective buyers will certainly see their money’s worth.

The glitch with the multimedia might be unit-specific, but it is something the automaker has to look into.

The Mazda3 1.5 Individual sedan retails from R418 800 and comes standard with a three-year or unlimited kilometre service plan, as well as a three-year or unlimited km warranty.


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FiestaST

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The new Mazda 3 is the 2019 Women's World Car of the Year

The Mazda 3 has been named as the 'Supreme Winner' of the 2019 Women's World Car of the Year awards.

Established in 2010, the voting panel consists of a panel of female judges from over 30 different countries, who are asked to vote according to criteria women use when buying a car.

 

FiestaST

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This is the 2019 Women’s World Car of the Year (+ category winners)

What does a woman want… when it comes to wheels? The answer is the latest-generation Mazda3, according an international jury of female motoring journalists.

The Mazda3, which was launched in South Africa in July, was named ‘Supreme Winner’ of the 2019 Women's World Car of the Year awards.

The jury, which represent over 30 countries, were asked to vote according to criteria that women use when buying a car. This year South Africa's flag was once again flown by motoring and transport writer Charleen Clarke.

According to the competition’s voting management leader Renuka Kirpalani, this year’s voting system was the most most egalitarian it has been in the nine-year history of the awards.

“We have had some vigorous discussions on the best structure to adopt, based on international market variations and car availability, and have all agreed on a very fair voting formula,” Kirpalani said.

 
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