absa online security

jxharding

Expert Member
Joined
May 4, 2006
Messages
1,630
i always read about suckers who get caught with online banking emails where you "confirm" your data to a fraudulent entity.
thought this would never even come near me.
i mean i got newest nod32 which updates every day, i cant visit dodgy sites even if i wanted to (firewalls, monitoring), i have never installed any activeX requests, i use Spybot, have latest updates for windows.


but then i got an email stating that i am a absa customer, and that i need to confirm my details.
obviously i didnt touch it , but it got me thinking.

how on earth did these bastards find out my email address (this is my private email address and not one i use on forums,i use it solely for important work and banking), and the fact that this is coupled with me being an absa customer? i can understand that e.g. i get an FNB email, i am not a FNB client, so there is no connection; it can just be a random email sent to me.
but this is not random. this is a very private and well hidden email address, not listed on any site whatsoever, ( i googled it and found 0 occurences), and it is probably just know to my employer,closest family, and absa.

years ago, i had a NSFAS loan. NSFAS misspelled my address horribly. e.g. Peter Street became Poeteri street.
After a year, Nedbank sent me mail to Poeteri Street as well. this was very obvious: NSFAS sold my info to Nedbank. I phoned NSFAS and whilst they didnt acknowledge it, they said they'd look into it.
The Nedbank mail stopped.

Im beginning to wonder if absa staff didnt somehow leak out this information ?
Or could it be that Absa sold my information to other companies and now it is coming back to haunt them?
 

Cider

Active Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2008
Messages
69
Colleague of mine father-in-law got rocked for 20k on one of these phishing emails.

You hve to wonder how they get your information.

Whenever you do a transaction with absa online, is it secure? Its not or your details are being solded which is probally the case.

Read the fine print when opening up an account, it could suggest that their "
partners" are allowed to contact you for information .. marketing related.

Big bucks selling company information these days.
 

gregmcc

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 29, 2006
Messages
23,599
It could be they used a dictionary attack or just target random email addresses. I once saw an attack on our email server at work. It started off at a@domain.com and went up to aaaaaa@domain.com looking for valid addresses.

They could also use a bot net to grab email addresses from infected clients. Maybe one of your friends has your email address and got infected? There are many ways to get a email address without it being leaked.



Colleague of mine father-in-law got rocked for 20k on one of these phishing emails.

Online banking is extremely safe - people must just learn never to click on any links in emails. They've been told this for years but there is always someone who falls for it.
 

Milano

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 7, 2004
Messages
16,696
It could be they used a dictionary attack or just target random email addresses. I once saw an attack on our email server at work. It started off at a@domain.com and went up to aaaaaa@domain.com looking for valid addresses.

They could also use a bot net to grab email addresses from infected clients. Maybe one of your friends has your email address and got infected? There are many ways to get a email address without it being leaked.

Yes, these are both very realistic possibilities and the most likely way it happened.
 

warwickw

Expert Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2008
Messages
1,561
Is your personnel email address used by any other people, friends family work etc, it could be that one of them got a virus or spam bot that has shared their address books with the spam and phishing communities.
 

jxharding

Expert Member
Joined
May 4, 2006
Messages
1,630
dictionary attack to generate my email and the fact that im a absa customer?
 
Last edited:

howardb

Expert Member
Joined
Sep 12, 2003
Messages
3,446
When will people learn not to click on these e-mail links...
 
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