Cloud computing too fast for broadband saturation in developing regions?

alatheia

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Dec 21, 2013
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147
We are new to Apple and bought an iPhone 5, 5S and MBP less than a year ago, or as recent as November 2013, yet already much of the sync-ability is gone.

We sadly divorced from Nokia thus also Windows, because Lumia is not supported by Nokia Suite and users "get forced through the cloud." The problem will be with us for another decade for various reasons, also because politicians won't release spectrum to service providers.

One purpose of this post is to a) clarify how safe it is to use third party apps without the risk of Apple negating it and b) what third party solutions can still be found, be it free or paid apps.

We bought Apple for local sync ability because broadband is not available to us, same as about the bulk of the global Internet population. iCloud services including sync functionality therefore is mostly impossible. Using iCloud sync where users are stuck with GPRS/Edge or, alternatively, insanely expensive data services, is a real nightmare. Then there is a problem with signal availability. 3.5G+ is only available in major centres on three continents and even then, it is not always reliable. Users should have the choice to decide whether to use local sync or the iCloud.

For example, Africa has roughly 1 billion people and a 15,6% internet saturation. This number is growing at a whopping rate of 3,600%. Three thousand six hundred per cent. Most of these users are relatively poor and cannot afford dearly expensive 3G/4G/LTE. They make use of 2G mostly and even then they have to only use the Internet when it really is necessary, so as to keep it being affordable. Mobile phones are being used mostly for Mixit, Whatsapp, BBM and WeChat. Of course, we are all dreaming of fast LTE and cloud services that will be making our lives easier, yet it remains evasive. People do not understand the vast distance and areas involved, and I am posting a link here to put Africa, for example, to give you some perspective. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...-together.html

Now imagine the enormous cost of erecting infrastructure and then to recoup it from a user base. Africa, parts of Australasia, Oceania and South America all suffer from the same problems and it even is evident that some European users are being affected adversely.

Apple, Nokia and Blackberry are losing market share very fast and especially Apple and Nokia are antagonising their loyal user base by not realising how these millions of people live and work. Samsung is taking Africa by storm and especially dual-SIM units sell as fast as it can be imported. Most users in developing nations need two or three mobile phones each to have signal from the various service providers, as that obviously is another variable to factor into the equation.

In the past, Apple had removed iSync and it is impossible to install/run it under Mavs. Already iSync cannot even be installed since ML as Apple won't allow it. Same with LibreOffice which works much better than its daddy OpenOffice, yet we cannot install it. And herein lies the point: if Apple denies Sync-Mate in future, we're stuck. And it can be expected after reading the article below and similar ones.

Can Apple therefore also flag the remainder of 3rd party sync apps as "untrusted" and disallow use of those? Should we rather return to Windows for this functionality?

A request: Comments welcome but please keep it to the point, constructive and let us find solutions together. Please do not even ask "why do you not want to use cloud services" as that would expose your lack of understanding of the global computing environment and that you have not read my post attentively.
 
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alatheia

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Joined
Dec 21, 2013
Messages
147
Some links to show what others were saying:

http://arstechnica.com/civis/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=1225375

http://www.theregister.co.uk/2013/11/07/apple_mandates_icloud_contact_syncing/


One should also bear in mind that the bulk of global broadband users' voices never get heard simply because of the cost of connectivy or due to bad signal quality. Many here may be too young to understand but we should anticipate those millions who still has to wait very long for every webpage to load/refresh. Because we have it easy does not mean that others have it as easy.
 

alatheia

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Joined
Dec 21, 2013
Messages
147
Nokia PC Suite capability worked well as it should have and so did iTunes sync. This is what users need without the need to connect to the Internet.

Nokia and Apple both removed this functionality and offended users whose way of life has been disrupted. I am by far mot the only one advocating for the resurrection of local sync.
 
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