Hyperion Dev - is it a good move?

Brenz

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Joined
May 26, 2016
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14
Hi all
I am looking to make a career move so was looking at www.hyperiondev.com to study web development online part time, as I cannot do full time or at a campus, as I need to continue working.
They offer boot camp courses, taking up to 6 months depending on your time invested.

So my question to you industry people -

Have you heard much about these courses, are they worthwhile?
Is this a good move to get a job in the industry?
Does the course equip you well enough to get hired afterwards?

Your assistance will be greatly appreciated.
 

bchip

Senior Member
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Mar 12, 2013
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977
So thats a no then
I think that people expect a lot from these bootcamps and udemy certificates, etc.
At the end of the day employers look for people with experience.
These certificates all help a CV, but they dont trump everything else on your CV.

Saying that (in other words) its not bad to do all these courses and bootcamps but just be careful
how much you pay for everything, Hyperiondev is for a certificate and costs R 45,000
A 3 yr degree at UNISA - BSc Computing costs ~R 20,000

You could do the self studying (loads of low cost courses available and create a profile
showing experience) or go the degree route, but the price at this bootcamp seems ridiculous
 

cguy

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I would only suggest a bootcamp if you are looking to get an entry level job, but really can’t motivate yourself to self-study otherwise (in some cases the entire value of a course can be that it provides curriculums, exams, practical deadlines, etc.).

In my experience, a BSc CS/Computing is the ideal way to start formal studies, but it is a large commitment and doesn’t necessarily mesh with everyone’s predilections.
 

Inn3rs3lf

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I have looked into this myself.

Hyperion is decent in getting you through the door for interviews. They have an alumni channel whereby you can converse with previous students and mentors. In addition, they work with a few companies (Particularly in finance it seems) and they are able to provide the companies with your portfolio to see if you would be a fit.

That being said, not many people can retain a full curriculum in their heads after 6 months.

Take Udemy classes, freecodecamp, frontend masters etc until you have a few projects under your belt. After you feel you are ready, then perhaps do the Bootcamp online for R19999. That will then reinstill the things you have learned, as well as give you a leg-up into the field.

This also depends which route you are taking, full stack dev, software dev etc. A BSc will help a ton more for software dev than it would for front end dev work.

But again, your portfolio speaks volumes.
 

Inn3rs3lf

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Oh, and when you sign up for Hyperiondevs free trial...expect to bombarded with 8 emails a day and 17 phone calls. They spam the crap out of you.
 

[)roi(]

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That’s some pretty lousy advice from Musk. One doesn’t stand much chance of getting a job in a top tier tech company without a degree. That includes Tesla and SpaceX.
It's not a binary issue.
 

[)roi(]

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That’s some pretty lousy advice from Musk. One doesn’t stand much chance of getting a job in a top tier tech company without a degree. That includes Tesla and SpaceX.
Maybe it's just me; but that kind of sounds a bit binary :rolleyes:

Traditional learning institutions like most things mired in historic dogma have an expiry date.
 

Inn3rs3lf

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That’s some pretty lousy advice from Musk. One doesn’t stand much chance of getting a job in a top tier tech company without a degree. That includes Tesla and SpaceX.
There are a plethora of devs that have no degree (even CS) that work for FANG companies and the like.
 

cguy

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Maybe it's just me; but that kind of sounds a bit binary :rolleyes:

Traditional learning institutions like most things mired in historic dogma have an expiry date.
It’s a probabilistic statement. “No chance” would be binary.

Most of the maths, stats, etc. learned has been quite valid for centuries. Data structures and algorithms, computational theory for many decades.
 
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cguy

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There are a plethora of devs that have no degree (even CS) that work for FANG companies and the like.
Not a plethora, some, and they’re a small minority, and tend to be relatively leveled down too.
 

Brenz

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I would only suggest a bootcamp if you are looking to get an entry level job, but really can’t motivate yourself to self-study otherwise (in some cases the entire value of a course can be that it provides curriculums, exams, practical deadlines, etc.).

In my experience, a BSc CS/Computing is the ideal way to start formal studies, but it is a large commitment and doesn’t necessarily mesh with everyone’s predilections.
Yes unfortunately 3 years is a long time for me to invest in a BSc, I am on the older side already, mid 30's, so am looking for a direction to get my foot in the door at a junior level and then work my way up while doing whatever learning I have to on the side.
 

Inn3rs3lf

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Yes unfortunately 3 years is a long time for me to invest in a BSc, I am on the older side already, mid 30's, so am looking for a direction to get my foot in the door at a junior level and then work my way up while doing whatever learning I have to on the side.
I am 37 and started learning in January. We are in the same boat :)

What path are you looking at going? Web dev, or software?
 
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