Illegal to Do Side Work on Visa?

sicelo.m

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 4, 2011
Messages
230
I would like to get some of your opinions and knowledge regarding my situation here in SA. I am a citizen of Swaziland, and am here in SA for volunteer work, for which I have a 2-year visa (currently waiting for renewal for a 3-year extension).

The organization I'm affiliated with is covering all my living expenses (food, board, medical, etc), and gives me a (very) small allowance for other personal stuff. I am fine with this arrangement, but once in a while a man needs/wants something which would need extra cash on the side. I have some technical skills, and could make a few bucks on the side without violating the conditions of my 'employer' as long as it is my spare time or I take vacation.

However, I suspect that while my employer hasn't a problem, I might get into problems with the Home Affairs or SARS, or both. Quoting from http://www.home-affairs.gov.za/index.php/applying-for-sa-visa,
"The visa will allow you to travel to a South African port of entry where an immigration official will then determine if you are allowed to enter South Africa and for how long you can stay for that particular visit. Visitors are restricted to the activity or reason for which their visas were issued.

On entry to South Africa, a visa is considered to be a visitor's permit. The permit’s period of validity is calculated from the date of entry into the country and will be set out under the heading "conditions" on the visa label. You must ensure that you apply for the correct visa/permit. Entry in the country may be refused if the purpose of visit was not correctly stated."
So, my question is: would it be illegal for me to make an extra buck on the side because of these visa conditions? For example, if you have a company and need someone to help just one or two weekends, would I be wrong to offer to help in that way?

I am a law-abiding person and also respect the rights of unemployed South Africans (my mom is South African originally btw, and all my maternal family are South Africans). However if a South African person wants me to help them for a fee with something, my conscience doesn't see that as taking a job that could be done by a South African. Also, in this case I am not even looking for a job, but once-off 'piece-jobs.'

If you know or can direct me to clearer information, I would appreciate it. If it is definitely a no-no, then I haven't any issue with it. Just going to wait until I marry me a South African girl and become a permanent resident :p (Oh, and no, not 'fake' marriage. I meant marriage in the true till-death-do-us-part sense:))

If it is possible, please direct me to information on how I can do so 'correctly' especially as far as SARS is concerned. I wouldn't want to bring embarrassment to myself and my 'employer' by doing something illegal in any way.

Sorry for long post.
 

Hemi300c

Honorary Master
Joined
Dec 15, 2009
Messages
20,194
Watch out they will kill you and burn your residence down. It's called xenophobia here in SA.
 

TEXTILE GUY

Executive Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2012
Messages
9,228
On entry to South Africa, a visa is considered to be a visitor's permit. The permit’s period of validity is calculated from the date of entry into the country and will be set out under the heading "conditions" on the visa label. You must ensure that you apply for the correct visa/permit. Entry in the country may be refused if the purpose of visit was not correctly stated."
So, my question is: would it be illegal for me to make an extra buck on the side because of these visa conditions? For example, if you have a company and need someone to help just one or two weekends, would I be wrong to offer to help in that way?
I am a law-abiding person
Read your own post and ask yourself .... would YOU employ YOU based on the information at hand?

I wouldn't, firstly because you have no work permit and secondly because you are already employed, and there are rules in BCE Act on working times and hours.
 

Arthur

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 7, 2003
Messages
24,182
Welcome to our country.

I am so sorry that our politicians have chosen to the implement the narrowest and most restrictive labour laws just like in Europe.

I don't know for sure, but I suspect you may not do anything other than breathe in and out.

It is deeply unjust. It is based on the ludicrous and absurd notion that there are "local" jobs, that if you perform work you somehow prevent someone else from doing so. This is patent nonsense. But it's the way most people and most states 'think' these days.

This is not the traditional European way, but since the rise of twentieth century statism it has pretty much become the norm.

Any sane human being welcomes you and is grateful for the contribution you make. I apologize that we have such silly laws and such restrictive visa conditions.

For what it's worth, here's a quote by AJP Taylor, the Brit historian. He summaries what life and law was like in England 100 years ago. Read it and weep.

"Until August 1914 a sensible, law-abiding Englishman could pass through life and hardly notice the existence of the state, beyond the post office and the policeman. He could live where he liked and as he liked. He had no official number or identity card. He could travel abroad or leave his country for ever without a passport or any sort of official permission. He could exchange his money for any other currency without restriction or limit. He could buy goods from any country in the world on the same terms as he bought goods at home. For that matter, a foreigner could spend his life in this country without permit and without informing the police. Unlike the countries of the European continent, the state did not require its citizens to perform military service. An Englishman could enlist, if he chose, in the regular army, the navy, or the territorials. He could also ignore, if he chose, the demands of national defence. Substantial householders were occasionally called on for jury service. Otherwise, only those helped the state who wished to do so."
 
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TEXTILE GUY

Executive Member
Joined
Oct 4, 2012
Messages
9,228
I am so sorry that our politicians have chosen to the implement the narrowest and most restrictive labour laws just like in Europe.
Now that's something I can honestly agree with.

Such laws are not only prohibitive to immigrants but labour and the economy, and, while promoting a sense of entitlement also drive the apparent xenophobic temperament to a degree.

If you were Chinese on the other hand .......
 

Ancalagon

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 23, 2010
Messages
15,746
Watch out they will kill you and burn your residence down. It's called xenophobia here in SA.
No no no the ANC does not like the term xenophobia. Too many bad connotations.

Blame it on apartheid instead.
 

sicelo.m

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 4, 2011
Messages
230
Thanks for your insight gentlemen.

Guess I should hasten on that girl ;) Unless someone starts saying I am infringing in on the rights of single South African men by taking a lady they could have married themselves, haha.
 
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