Sprouting & microgreens

saor

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 3, 2012
Messages
19,922
Been getting back into sprouting again & this is how easy it is:

You'll need:

● Untreated seeds to sprout (see links at end of post)
● Jars (available everywhere)
● Netting (can buy at fabric shops)
● Elastics (in the random-stuff drawer)
● Something to keep the jars upside-down

1.) Soak the seeds overnight
2.) Cover with netting and store upside-down (so water can run out after rinsing)
3.) Rinse with water twice a day
4.) Ready to eat after a few days
5.) Store for a few days in the fridge

Netting and elastics:
20170219-P1020704.jpg

Seeds soaking in water:
20170219-P1020700.jpg

Jars stored upside-down and rinsing twice a day:
20170219-P1020705.jpg

A few days later roots are out and leaves have formed.
These were transferred to a container and left in the open so the leaves can get greener.
20170219-P1020707.jpg

https://www.sproutingseeds.co.za/
http://www.seedsforafrica.co.za/collections/sprouting-seeds
http://livingseeds.co.za/
http://www.kitchengarden.co.za/
 

saor

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 3, 2012
Messages
19,922
I use this method.
The water drains ok?
Looks cool though - reminds me I need to get some mung beans again.
You ever just left the mung beans in there? They can get ridiculously big.
 

satanboy

Psychonaut seven
Joined
Sep 13, 2007
Messages
96,002
The water drains ok?
Looks cool though - reminds me I need to get some mung beans again.
You ever just left the mung beans in there? They can get ridiculously big.
The water drains out fast.
 

Hosehead

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
7,837
What is the purpose/benefit of this?
Nothing.

I just soak pea shoots or sunflower seeds or wheatgrass seeds. For 3 days in a big jar Then drain and leave covered in a colander to sprout tails usually 2 days with rinsing morn and night then transfer to soil trays for about a week
The problem is rodents and birds - keeping the fskers away as rats chew threw nets and plastic and romp through the greens effectively rendering a whole tray useless
 

saor

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 3, 2012
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19,922
What is the purpose/benefit of this?
● Diversity of foods in the diet.
● It's fresh.
● It's a cheap source of homegrown foods without much environmental footprint (less packaging etc.).
● Some sprouts have an amazing nutritional profile - broccoli sprouts for example are loaded with sulforaphane.
● It's an easy way to produce homegrown food for people without access to large amounts of land.
● And the thing I don't want to say but will say anyway because I like the sound of it: It's a living food, not something that was pulled out the ground 5 days ago; the same reason I enjoy eating tomatoes off the tree and carrots out the ground: Something about it just feels right/nice/good.
 

HavocXphere

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
31,488
● Diversity of foods in the diet.
● It's fresh.
● It's a cheap source of homegrown foods without much environmental footprint (less packaging etc.).
● Some sprouts have an amazing nutritional profile - broccoli sprouts for example are loaded with sulforaphane.
● It's an easy way to produce homegrown food for people without access to large amounts of land.
● And the thing I don't want to say but will say anyway because I like the sound of it: It's a living food, not something that was pulled out the ground 5 days ago; the same reason I enjoy eating tomatoes off the tree and carrots out the ground: Something about it just feels right/nice/good.
Cool thanks for explaining
 

maumau

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
13,137
I just bought a sprouting jar yesterday, hoping sprouts have the same benefits as microgreens without the effort.

Where do you guys get the seeds from? I've been buying from umuthi:

https://www.sproutingseeds.co.za

EDIT: i see saor mentioned them in OP.
 
Last edited:

maumau

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
13,137
Hmm. Interesting post. Gonna try this to feed my parrot.

Not sure how true this is, but just so you know:

" A commercial organic mash diet is composed of the following ingredients: buckwheat, hulled gray millet, hulled white (proso) millet, spirulina, chia, Alfalfa, clay, sea kelp, anise, natural sources of vitamins, minerals and trace minerals. (Can be wrapped in thin slices of banana for feeding). This mash has been clinically correlated with the abatement of pruritis in several birds suspected to be suffering from food allergies. Once the mash has been accepted, the proportion of banana can be gradually decreased until eliminated. However, a bird could potentially be allergic to any dietary ingredient."

Source:
https://sproutpeople.org/sprouts/nutrition/science/#broccolibrain
 

Suspect99

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 22, 2012
Messages
5,332
Not sure how true this is, but just so you know:

" A commercial organic mash diet is composed of the following ingredients: buckwheat, hulled gray millet, hulled white (proso) millet, spirulina, chia, Alfalfa, clay, sea kelp, anise, natural sources of vitamins, minerals and trace minerals. (Can be wrapped in thin slices of banana for feeding). This mash has been clinically correlated with the abatement of pruritis in several birds suspected to be suffering from food allergies. Once the mash has been accepted, the proportion of banana can be gradually decreased until eliminated. However, a bird could potentially be allergic to any dietary ingredient."

Source:
https://sproutpeople.org/sprouts/nutrition/science/#broccolibrain
Thanks. My African grey is still very young. Busy figuring out what he likes and dislikes. This far any sweet fruit is gobbled up. He loves carrots as well. Doesn't eat banana or dates and figs, too mushy I suppose, although he still gulps down his formula
 

TheSlinger

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 6, 2014
Messages
755
Very interesting indeed. I used to do this a few years ago, but this has inspired me to have another go. I have ordered some seeds and we'll see how the different ones compare. Only really used lentils before...
 

saor

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 3, 2012
Messages
19,922
Microgreens are just as easy.

► Put soil into a shallow container (I'm using a mix of potting soil & vermiculite)
► Sprinkle seeds on top
► Cover with a thin layer of soil
► Water (wet all the way through)
► Wait.
► Water.
► Wait.

Pictured below is Japanese radish, sunflower, beet, swiss chard, broccoli.

Soil mix in containers:
20170227-P1020758.jpg

Various seeds on top & covering with soil:
20170227-P1020762.jpg

Booya!
20170305-P1020768.jpg
20170226-P1020741.jpg
20170305-P1020766.jpg
20170226-P1020740.jpg
 

maumau

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
13,137
Microgreens are just as easy.

► Put soil into a shallow container (I'm using a mix of potting soil & vermiculite)
► Sprinkle seeds on top
► Cover with a thin layer of soil
► Water (wet all the way through)
► Wait.
► Water

Booya!
You don't use lights?
 
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