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The Craft Beer Thread

Toxxyc

Expert Member
Joined
Dec 12, 2012
Messages
1,488
I’m selling my kegerator, two 19L kegs and all connectors. I’ve had some problems with my pancreas of late. So have to stop drinking, and it’s just torture to make beer your can’t drink. Everything for R3500



This is tempting, but also wife-will-kill-me-right-now type of stuff...
 

BCO

Honorary Master
Joined
Dec 17, 2004
Messages
13,214
I just posted this on FB. Worth reading for some behind-the-scenes stuff:

This week, quietly and without fanfare, the landscape of the South African craft beer scene changed radically for the worse when the country’s largest craft beer distributor (who I’ll hereafter refer to as The Draught Guys) sold all their draught dispensing equipment to the country’s largest “craft” brewing group (hereafter The Pizza Dudes). Overnight, many hundreds of taps in scores of restaurants and bars became the property of one brewery.

To put the scope of this development into perspective, let me explain the underlying business model driving draught beer sales in the craft category. Draught dispensing equipment refers to the taps, towers, coolers and other items required to pour beer out of a keg, through a tap into your glass. This equipment is quite expensive to buy, install and maintain which means that the majority of bar and restaurant owners choose not to own their own equipment. Instead, they typically take on the services of a distributor or brewery who will install and maintain the equipment in exchange for sales exclusivity on that equipment. So, if my bar has equipment installed by a particular distributor/brewery, then I undertake only to order products from that distributor/brewery. The cost of the equipment is then amortized over a period through the profit margin generated by the sale of kegs.

This model has proven to be very popular in recent years, resulting in the proliferation of craft beer on tap throughout the country. Over time, a certain amount of consolidation has taken place – we’ve seen the majority of tap space in the trade being dominated by the Big 4 local craft breweries and – significantly – by The Draught Guys. Competition for taps has become fierce recently simply as a function of limited real estate. A bar can only sustainably operate a certain number of taps before they start running into issues of space and stock expiry, meaning that every brewery who wants to grow their market share either must put taps into outlets that don’t currently have taps (a rarity these days) OR they need to convince an outlet to replace their taps. The second option happens quite frequently, particularly when certain of the bigger breweries offer aggressive deals and low pricing.

This is where The Draught Guys have hitherto played a very important role in our industry. As a distributor, they represent a large portfolio of breweries which they can offer to trade customers. However, unlike most distributors, who only offer a delivery service, The Draught Guys also owned a huge stockpile of dispensing equipment that they could install in the trade. What this means is that if I owned a bar and I chose the services of The Draught Guys, they would install a dispensing system at no cost to me and I would then be free to choose whatever products they offered in their basket, whether it was from a big craft brewery or from a tiny micro operation.
Additionally, if I had multiple taps, I could order products from a whole range of different companies, thereby giving the consumer a choice of products from different breweries.
The Draught Guys’ model was hugely beneficial to smaller breweries in particular, who – unlike the Big 4 – can’t afford to buy, install and maintain their own equipment. In fact, this model was so successful the The Draught Guys owned probably as much dispensing equipment in the trade as any one of the Big 4 Breweries. And a large proportion of those taps were pouring beer that was not supplied by one of the Big 4. The Draught Guys were central in providing the craft beer consumer with a diversity of interesting and independent products and this is why the sale of their equipment to The Pizza Dudes can’t be good for the industry.

One of the reasons that the “craft” beer industry came into being in the first place, is that consumers grew weary of being offered only the illusion of choice provided by a handful of macro breweries making light lagers. Craft beer gave people choice again, not only in terms of the beer styles on offer, but also in terms of who produced the beer.

Now, in a tactical master stroke, The Pizza Dudes appear to have taken us closer to the pre-craft era than we’ve been in years. What have they done specifically, you ask?
Step one: create the illusion of consumer choice. The Pizza Dudes set up various in-house brands in addition to their core brand; they quietly acquired several small independent breweries; they secured distribution rights for some big international brands. They were now able to offer a product basket appeared diverse and interesting to the consumer, even thought the vast majority of those products were produced in the same factory.

Step two: hit the market HARD. Armed with their lovely product basket, The Pizza Dudes’ sale force began aggressively targeting beer tap market share. By leveraging economies of scale, and by not shying away from loss leaders, they were able to offer keg prices and incentive deals that no other brewery in the country could match. This proved immensely successful and soon the Pizza Dudes had the largest market share of any individual craft beer supplier.
Notwithstanding this success, The Draught Guys remained an obstacle to the Pizza Dudes’ market domination. Unlike their other 3 main competitors, The Draught Guys could also make a compelling case to customers in terms of the variety of their offering.

So they implemented Step three: buy out your competition.

Effective this week, all of The Draught Guys’ dispensing equipment has become the property of the Pizza Dudes. That means that the Pizza Dudes now own taps in the trade that are pouring their competitors’ products. And in light of their historical marketplace tactics, is it likely that the Pizza Dudes will abide this? I think not.

Over the next few weeks we are likely to see dozens, if not hundreds of taps that had been pouring beers from small independent breweries being replaced with products from the basket of one company – the biggest, least independent craft brewery in South Africa. And if that’s not a loss for the craft beer consumer and the small producers in South Africa, then I don’t know what is.
 

saor

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 3, 2012
Messages
16,774
Thanks.

I'm sure this will go in cycles, but I also think this is showing signs of the end of the craft beer hype cycle. Smaller guys or those in it for the "money" will fall out. Those in it for the love and producing quality should maintain their niche.
Be cool if some of the bigger stores like Liquor City had a fridge just for smaller garage brewer's and invited a few people each week to sell a few of their beers.
 
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