The F-35 thread

Dave

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Delayed a year because the first production model crashed during an engine test.

I wondered why Wiki showed that 2 production models + 10 test airframes had been built yet Tass was reporting there was only one production model in service. So the actual first production model crashed and what they are now describing as first production model in service is actually the second production airframe built.
 

Blu82

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Currently the Su-57 is not it a 5th generation fighter as it can not super cruise. They engine with that capability is due 2022.

A new engine was specifically developed for the Su-57, known as Izdeliye 30 (literally Product 30), but, since the engine is not yet ready for production and tested only on an earlier prototype, T-50S-2 is still using the Saturn AL-41F-1, derived from the Su-35 Flanker E’s engine. The Product 30, which should provide 18,000 kgf of thrust instead of the 15,000 kgf of the current engine, is supposed to be more efficient than previous designs and able to give the Felon a top speed in excess of Mach 2 and a supercruise capability at Mach 1.3, featuring also 3D thrust vectoring and a “stealthier” nozzle. Production of the Product 30 engine should begin in 2022, with the first serial deliveries of the Product 30-equipped Su-57 in 2023

Source
 

Dave

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Currently the Su-57 is not it a 5th generation fighter as it can not super cruise. They engine with that capability is due 2022.

The Product 30, which should provide 18,000 kgf of thrust instead of the 15,000 kgf of the current engine, is supposed to be more efficient than previous designs and able to give the Felon a top speed in excess of Mach 2 and a supercruise capability at Mach 1.3,

Source

Maybe the Russkies should try and steal plans and reverse engineer the F135 engine for future use ;)
 

Blu82

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Not ideal to say the least.

The Lockheed Martin-made F-35′s mission capable rate — which describes the percentage of aircraft that can meet at least one of its assigned missions — currently sits at 69 percent, falling short of the military’s longstanding 80 percent goal, said Ellen Lord, whose time as the undersecretary for acquisition and sustainment ended Jan. 20 at noon after Joe Biden was inaugurated as president.

Source
 

Dave

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Not ideal to say the least.



Source

Quite naughty to quote without context...

the F-16 mission capable rate reached a high of 75% in June 2019, the F-22 mission capable rate achieved a high of 68% in April 2019 and the F-35 mission capability rate climbed to a high of 74% in September 2019. However, the F-22’s mission-capable rate actually decreased from 52 percent in FY18 to 51 percent in FY19
Currently, between 63 and 76 percent of Super Hornets are mission capable
The fleet’s readiness rate, including both the Marine Corps MV-22 and Air Force Special Operations Command CV-22 reportedly hovers at about 52 percent.

But lets be fashionable and pretend the F35 is “not ideal” and way out of line with other US planes...

;)
 

Blu82

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Quite naughty to quote without context...





But lets be fashionable and pretend the F35 is “not ideal” and way out of line with other US planes...

;)
So the not ideal extends to all the mentioned aircraft. This is the F-35 thread however. I should however note that 72% on the F-16 might be the reason that there are rumors floating around that they are going to be procuring more of a 36 year old aircraft.


Not bad for an aircraft nicknamed the lawn dart early on.
 

Dave

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So the not ideal extends to all the mentioned aircraft. This is the F-35 thread however. I should however note that 72% on the F-16 might be the reason that there are rumors floating around that they are going to be procuring more of a 36 year old aircraft.


Not bad for an aircraft nicknamed the lawn dart early on.


You’ll likely never see more than 80% availability even in a perfect world, as an example, when a plane is in maintenance and they need widget A for the service and order it for the next day, that’s a day of unavailability even if the plane could quite easily still be used if the s**t hit the fan. Just like when your car goes for a service and the mechanic has to wait a day for a new air filter.
 

Dave

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So the not ideal extends to all the mentioned aircraft. This is the F-35 thread however. I should however note that 72% on the F-16 might be the reason that there are rumors floating around that they are going to be procuring more of a 36 year old aircraft.


Not bad for an aircraft nicknamed the lawn dart early on.

F16 has been in the spares channel so long it’s unlikely anything is ordered/manufactured to order anymore.

With regards to 36 year old aircraft (more like 42 years old iirc), have you heard the term “Trigger’s broom” before?
 

Blu82

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F16 has been in the spares channel so long it’s unlikely anything is ordered/manufactured to order anymore.

With regards to 36 year old aircraft (more like 42 years old iirc), have you heard the term “Trigger’s broom” before?
I kinda glossed over that part.
 

Dave

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Turkey wants to get into the F35 program, maybe they hope the new administration will be more lenient on them.

 

Blu82

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So this happened.

The underside of a U.S. Marine Corps F-35B Joint Strike Fighter was significantly damaged when a round fired from its underbelly 25mm gun pod exploded shortly after leaving the muzzle of the cannon mounted within. The accident, which occurred over the Yuma Range Complex in Arizona earlier this month, did not injure the pilot of the jet, who was able to bring the aircraft safely back to base.

Source
 

Blu82

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So interesting reading by this section regarding the utilization of the F-35 In war games against China is interesting.

"For years, Air Force officials have portrayed the F-35 as the aircraft that it would use to infiltrate into enemy airspace to knock out surface-to-air missiles and other threats without being seen. However, in the war game, that role was played by the more survivable NGAD, in part due to the F-35′s inability to traverse the long ranges of the Pacific without a tanker nearby, Hinote said.

Instead, the F-35 attacked Chinese surface ships and ground targets, protected American and Taiwanese assets from Chinese aircraft, and provided cruise missile defense during the exercise. But “it’s not the one that’s pushing all the way in [Chinese airspace], or even over China’s territory,” Hinote said.

Notably, the F-35s used during the war game were the more advanced F-35 Block 4 aircraft under development, which will feature a suite of new computing equipment known as “Tech Refresh 3,” enhancements to its radar and electronic warfare systems, and new weapons.

“We wouldn’t even play the current version of the F-35,” Hinote said. “It wouldn’t be worth it. … Every fighter that rolls off the line today is a fighter that we wouldn’t even bother putting into these scenarios.”

Source
 
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Pegasus

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So interesting reading by this section regarding the utilisation of the F-35 In wargames against China is interesting.

"For years, Air Force officials have portrayed the F-35 as the aircraft that it would use to infiltrate into enemy airspace to knock out surface-to-air missiles and other threats without being seen. However, in the war game, that role was played by the more survivable NGAD, in part due to the F-35′s inability to traverse the long ranges of the Pacific without a tanker nearby, Hinote said.

Instead, the F-35 attacked Chinese surface ships and ground targets, protected American and Taiwanese assets from Chinese aircraft, and provided cruise missile defense during the exercise. But “it’s not the one that’s pushing all the way in [Chinese airspace], or even over China’s territory,” Hinote said.

Notably, the F-35s used during the war game were the more advanced F-35 Block 4 aircraft under development, which will feature a suite of new computing equipment known as “Tech Refresh 3,” enhancements to its radar and electronic warfare systems, and new weapons.

“We wouldn’t even play the current version of the F-35,” Hinote said. “It wouldn’t be worth it. … Every fighter that rolls off the line today is a fighter that we wouldn’t even bother putting into these scenarios.”

China could barely beat Tibet in a war.
 
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