The F-35 thread

Dave

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Not if there is lightning.


Not the B's that are being discussed in the above post (also not the C's).

The problem is with the Onboard Inert Gas Generation System (OBIGGS) is a safety subsystem common in modern airplanes. A typical OBIGGS system diverts air from the aircraft engine and separates the nitrogen, injecting it into the jet’s fuel tanks. The more inflammable nitrogen present the less flammable oxygen, helping reduce the possibility of fuel tank explosions. Wartime damage aside, one way a fuel tank explosion might take place is as a result of a lightning strike.

Inspectors at the Air Force’s Ogden Logistics Complex discovered damage to the tubes that funnel nitrogen into the fuel tanks in 14 out of 24 out of F-35As inspected. The problem appears limited to the Air Force’s F-35A model. The U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, which operate the -C and -B versions of the F-35, have not seen similar problems.

 

Blu82

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That surprises me since I though that system will be common across all three air frames.
 

Dave

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That surprises me since I though that system will be common across all three air frames.

Supposedly the OBIGGS system is different in the A.

The issue only seems to affect the F-35A conventional-takeoff-and-landing variant, which is used by the U.S. Air Force and the majority of international customers. The OBIGGS design is slightly different on the F-35B short-takeoff-and-vertical-landing variant due to the aircraft’s lift fan, and the problem has not been observed on F-35C carrier-takeoff-and-landing aircraft, Ashworth said.


The report also seems to point the finger at Air Force maintainers as the damage to the pipe is being caused in the field and not during manufacture.

The company believes that the problem is being caused “in the field after aircraft delivery” meaning while in the hands of the Air Force. There are no reports as of yet in the hands of foreign F-35 operators
 

Blu82

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The report on the F-35 crash at Englin Air Force base is out. That lists goes from pilot error right down to previously unknown software design features that makes the tail unresponsive.

In its conclusion to the report, the Accident Investigation Board President, Colonel Bryan T. Callahan, makes it clear that no fewer than six factors led to the loss of the F-35.
The accident report identified the HMD misalignment as the “critical confounding item that ultimately resulted in over-saturation” of the pilot. It records the fact that the pilot had previously experienced misalignment with the HMD, and maintainers had addressed these issues on the ground, but, without modifications, there was no way of checking alignment once in the aircraft.
The pilot’s final effort to recover the jet saw him hold the stick aft, which would normally bring the nose back up, and then select full afterburner on the jet’s F135 engine in an attempt to abort the landing and get back in the air for another landing attempt. Take-off, however, was made impossible by the fully deflected stabilizers, which kept the nose down.
The accident report also notes that the pilot had additional tangential distractions on his mind that added to the here-and-now worry about the HMD. A day earlier, for example, the pilot was notified of exposure to the COVID-19 virus and was awaiting a colleague’s test results to determine his susceptibility.
In the report, the pilot notes other more immediate distractions too, including a poorly lit runway area that meant he had to “point into the black abyss” to get his jet back onto the runway. At the same time, this was compounded by the aforementioned green glow issue.


Source
 
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Pegasus

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WASHINGTON — The U.S. State Department on Oct. 9 approved the sale of the F/A-18EF Super Hornet and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter to Finland, paving the way for the nation to purchase American jets should either Boeing or Lockheed Martin win its ongoing fighter competition.
The two U.S. offerings are facing off in a multinational contest that also includes France’s Dassault Rafale, the British-made Eurofighter Typhoon and the Swedish Saab Gripen E/F.
The F-35 package, worth $12.5 billion, includes 64 F-35A conventional-takeoff-and-landing jets, 66 Pratt & Whitney F135 engines, and the aircraft’s associated communications and electronic warfare systems. Notably, it contains not only the aircraft’s current logistics system — the troubled Autonomic Logistics Information System — but also its replacement — the Operational Data Integrated Network — which is under development.
Meanwhile, the Super Hornet package — worth an estimated $14.7 billion — includes 50 single-seat F/A-18E jets, eight double-seated F/A-18Fs and 14 EA-18G Growlers, which is the electronic attack variant. The package also includes 166 F414-GE-400 engines for the dual-engine fighter, Sniper targeting pods, AN/APG-79 radars, AN/ALR-67(V)3 electric warfare countermeasures receiving sets, and Next Generation Jammer Midband and advanced electronic attack kits for the EA-18G.
 

access

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WASHINGTON — The U.S. State Department on Oct. 9 approved the sale of the F/A-18EF Super Hornet and F-35 Joint Strike Fighter to Finland, paving the way for the nation to purchase American jets should either Boeing or Lockheed Martin win its ongoing fighter competition.
The two U.S. offerings are facing off in a multinational contest that also includes France’s Dassault Rafale, the British-made Eurofighter Typhoon and the Swedish Saab Gripen E/F.
The F-35 package, worth $12.5 billion, includes 64 F-35A conventional-takeoff-and-landing jets, 66 Pratt & Whitney F135 engines, and the aircraft’s associated communications and electronic warfare systems. Notably, it contains not only the aircraft’s current logistics system — the troubled Autonomic Logistics Information System — but also its replacement — the Operational Data Integrated Network — which is under development.
Meanwhile, the Super Hornet package — worth an estimated $14.7 billion — includes 50 single-seat F/A-18E jets, eight double-seated F/A-18Fs and 14 EA-18G Growlers, which is the electronic attack variant. The package also includes 166 F414-GE-400 engines for the dual-engine fighter, Sniper targeting pods, AN/APG-79 radars, AN/ALR-67(V)3 electric warfare countermeasures receiving sets, and Next Generation Jammer Midband and advanced electronic attack kits for the EA-18G.

the podestas still involved with boeing and lockheed?
 

Dave

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The future competitor has entered service.



Entered service is a bit of a misnomer when it's the grand total of ONE plane. Even five planes by the end of 2021 hardly constitutes full service especially as it doesn't have its planned engine yet (that's only coming in 2022, if they actually get it working properly).


I would also doubt many F22 and F35 pilots will lose a lot of sleep over the SU-57 even when it does properly enter service.
 

Pegasus

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Entered service is a bit of a misnomer when it's the grand total of ONE plane. Even five planes by the end of 2021 hardly constitutes full service especially as it doesn't have its planned engine yet (that's only coming in 2022, if they actually get it working properly).


I would also doubt many F22 and F35 pilots will lose a lot of sleep over the SU-57 even when it does properly enter service.
Apparently there are 12 that have been built, 10 are in service.

It seems they have most of the bugs sorted out.
We'll have to watch the youtube comments section to see if they are any good.

Quite an interesting video to watch.
 

Dave

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Apparently there are 12 that have been built, 10 are in service.

It seems they have most of the bugs sorted out.
We'll have to watch the youtube comments section to see if they are any good.

Quite an interesting video to watch.

Nope, read the link, there is only one operational model with 4 more coming over the year, they will all be powered by the (underpowered) test model engine.

The original 10 were all pre-production test airframes.
 

Blu82

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The future competitor has entered service.


Delayed a year because the first production model crashed during an engine test.

TASS reports that a flight control system failure caused the crash, with one source stating it had to do with the aircraft's tail control surfaces. Interfax reports the aircraft was the first production Su-57 ever and it was supposed to be delivered to the Russian Air Force by year's end. If this is the case, it would be a significant blow to the program on a number of levels.


Source
 
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