Ubuntu, create a user with a blank password

d0b33

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Messages
17,429
If you're like me and not paranoid about security this might be useful...

->Open a terminal (Applications -> Accessories -> Terminal)

->Type
Code:
sudo gedit /etc/shadow

->Look for the line containing your user
eg.
Code:
user:[B]$1$5druSp26$nVpXn5EVk73sWzZlhLuXNB1[/B]:13996:0:99999:7:::

->Replace the Bold text with
Code:
U6aMy0wojraho
eg.
Code:
user:[B]U6aMy0wojraho[/B]:13996:0:99999:7:::

Save the file and logout to test

Use at your own risk
 

davemc

Executive Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2009
Messages
6,518
Isn't that key encoded by the "randomly" generated key that is part of your installation's base certificate?

i.e. Would that not be different form installation to installation?

EDIT: Nevermind, thanks for the tip Aqua-Lung
 

d0b33

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Messages
17,429
Isn't that key encoded by the "randomly" generated key that is part of your installation's base certificate?

i.e. Would that not be different form installation to installation?

Yes. it's just an example, I copied it off a blog.

But the tip works great no probs on my side.
 

Other Pineapple Smurf

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
14,594
Nice, but I use "password" as the default password, not because I'm paranoid, its just you need this second level confirmation when doing admin tasks. Only time a passwordless user is of use is a Guest user.
 

MyWorld

Executive Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2004
Messages
5,001
Why would you remove the password?
Just set your DE up to log you in directly to the desktop and skip authentication.

That password comes in handy every now and then.
 

d0b33

Honorary Master
Joined
Jul 16, 2004
Messages
17,429
Why would you remove the password?
Just set your DE up to log you in directly to the desktop and skip authentication.

That password comes in handy every now and then.

I'm lazy and run apps that ask for a password all the time, I login automatically already.
 

Other Pineapple Smurf

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
14,594
Just set your sudo session not to time out. Then you only use your password once. But this is what I love about LINUX - you can customise it for how you want it and not how some corporate expects you to use it.

But anyway, I keep the default settings as I do not want my wife screwing up my box when she clicks on the wrong things.
 
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