Using loadbalancing to address GP water supply?

noob_saibot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2014
Messages
280
Hello,

If you are in the ICT sector, you may be familiar with a concept called "load-balancing" that is normally used to handle server loads.

Now based on this principle of "balancing a load", would it be possible to do the same thing with the current water shortage in GP?

For example, let's say the East Rand has 80% capacity in their reservoirs, so the municipality then stops pumping water to them, whilst keeping their water running, moving the water at less pressure to consumers, whilst Rand Water redirects all the water that would have been supplied to East Rand to a place like Tshwane West (thereby increasing pressure to maximum capacity to be supplied to Tshwane West).

Once East Rand starts decreasing to a level of about 50%, they slow down the supply to consumers completely and then slowly increase the pressure to the reservoir/s in East Rand, whilst decreasing the supply to Tshwane West (to a slower level).

Would a technique like this (or similar) where the load is balanced until everyone reaches a point of minimal consumption work?
 

Sinbad

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 5, 2006
Messages
69,617
I think you're expecting a bunch of idiots to actually manage something that requires forethought and planning.
 

R13...

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Messages
31,580
I'm sure the pump stations aren't designed to share that way across municipalities. Rand water bulk pumps to various sections supplied by JW. Plus I'm sure the east rand have their own water company called ERWSomething.
 

ToxicBunny

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
86,927
The systems aren't designed in that way... so they can't do a "load balancing" type of operation.
 

creeper

Executive Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2010
Messages
5,049
Load balancing is one way, but Operations Research might also work well. It is the methods to optimise with some fancy mathematical tools. It isn't dynamic, but today's computers can calculate must quicker than the old ones.
 

noob_saibot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2014
Messages
280
The systems aren't designed in that way... so they can't do a "load balancing" type of operation.
Where can one find the relevant information about their system structure?

All I'm getting is companies selling pumps and Rand Waters website doesn't have much info either.
 

ToxicBunny

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 8, 2006
Messages
86,927
Where can one find the relevant information about their system structure?

All I'm getting is companies selling pumps and Rand Waters website doesn't have much info either.
Your municipality or Rand Water..

They more than likely won't tell you...
 

R13...

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2008
Messages
31,580
Load balancing is one way, but Operations Research might also work well. It is the methods to optimise with some fancy mathematical tools. It isn't dynamic, but today's computers can calculate must quicker than the old ones.
There is no need for fancy computer work here. This is simple level control, the system is obviously usually at steady state but such a huge disturbance takes time for the control system to stabilise. I know it's not really one system per se but the concept is the same a level controller is an unstable system that will run away in one direction is the in out flows are not balanced.
 

noob_saibot

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2014
Messages
280
There is no need for fancy computer work here. This is simple level control, the system is obviously usually at steady state but such a huge disturbance takes time for the control system to stabilise. I know it's not really one system per se but the concept is the same a level controller is an unstable system that will run away in one direction is the in out flows are not balanced.
You may not know the answer to this (as it goes back to the time when the structures were built), but did they use some type of probability model to estimate systemic failure back then?

If yes, are these probabilities still applicable in todays times (considering a growing middle-class and aging infrastructure) ?
 
Top