Wallbox and Patching

Joined
Feb 29, 2012
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22
So, I have been given a virtually brand new wall box and and multiple patch panels lay within.

HOW do I use it?

I have two switches and a router attached to my server, and two switches elsewhere within my office.

How do I link everything using the box, without needing a cable for every computer/printer into the box? Also how do I link the patch units to eachother?
 
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
Messages
22
This makes absolutely no sense.
Ah, I see the error in my wording.

What I meant, was how do i link up the patch panel and the switches so that I do not need to run individual cables to each and every device from the box.

I.e., patch panel to switch, and then switch to devices
 

Light

Active Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2004
Messages
63
So, I have been given a virtually brand new wall box and and multiple patch panels lay within.

HOW do I use it?

I have two switches and a router attached to my server, and two switches elsewhere within my office.

How do I link everything using the box, without needing a cable for every computer/printer into the box? Also how do I link the patch units to eachother?
The most important thing when working with a wall box, patch panels and cables is to always remember to dissipate any remaining information stored in them. Many beginners skip this important step, often with disasterous results.

Information, as we know, is encoded into bits and then converted into a stream of electrons which flow down the cable. The cable itself consists of a number of twisted pairs of wires, twisted as such to cancel out any interferance which may occur from outside sources such as a cell phone, car distributor or the resonant frequency of your pet parrot.

The problem is that the twist in the cable which doesn't allow any interferance to get in also prevents any unused information from getting out. So at the instant that you unplug a cable, there is still information inside it, and this information will slowly leak harmlessly out of the unconnected end of the cable until it is completely empty.

If however you were to plug this cable immediately into another port, the information trapped within will leak through into your network causing protocol mismatches and packet crashes. In extreme cases this may result in other devices on your network overloading and catching fire.

Now wall boxes are especially problematic when it comes to information leak in that an incorrect connection between patch panels could result in a loop being formed where the cable ends up being linked back into itself. The normal RJ-45 connector was specifically designed to prevent this from happening in normal circumstances by using raised plastic to prevent a single cable from being connected to itself.

If a loop occurs then the information cannot escape or be used up by a device on the network and will cycle around and around faster and faster due to the impedance difference between the cable and the patch panel. The end result being a vortex opened to another dimension, usually filled with hordes of demonic creatures which will flood through into the room and carry you off victoriously back to their realm.

I would agree that wireless is the better way to go. Far safer.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 29, 2012
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If a loop occurs then the information cannot escape or be used up by a device on the network and will cycle around and around faster and faster due to the impedance difference between the cable and the patch panel. The end result being a vortex opened to another dimension, usually filled with hordes of demonic creatures which will flood through into the room and carry you off victoriously back to their realm.

I would agree that wireless is the better way to go. Far safer.
Ah, so thats what the buzzing sound from the router is. Thank you wise one, I have hastily removed the power cables and not a second too soon, I could hear the demons scratching on the otherside.

Can anyone who hasn't exceeded their daily lysergide dose provide advice?
 

PsyWulf

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Nov 22, 2006
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Can anyone who hasn't exceeded their daily lysergide dose provide advice?
Would but i'm still confused

Are you trying to avoid running 20 cables to 20 machines or are you trying to avoid 20 cables from patch panel to switch?
 

biena

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Dec 6, 2006
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Can anyone who hasn't exceeded their daily lysergide dose provide advice?
Pretty sure I'm under my daily dose but then I don't know the answer either. Do feel that time is slowly passing
lysergide
a psychotomimetic, semisynthetic derivative of ergot that acts at multiple sites in the central nervous system from the cortex to the spinal cord. In susceptible individuals, as little as 20 to 25 mg of the potent drug may cause pupillary dilation, increased blood pressure, hyperreflexia, tremor, muscle weakness, piloerection, and increased body temperature. Larger doses also produce dizziness, drowsiness, paresthesia, euphoria or dysphoria, and synesthesias. Colors may be heard, sounds visualized, and time is felt to pass slowly. Psychologic dependence may develop, and use of lysergide is associated with significant hazards such as panic, serious depression, paranoid behavior, and prolonged psychotic episodes. Also called (slang) acid, LSD (an abbreviation of the original German name, Lyserg-Säure-Diäthylamid, (lysergic acid diethylamide). See also hallucinogen.
 

Light

Active Member
Joined
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Messages
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Ah, so thats what the buzzing sound from the router is. Thank you wise one, I have hastily removed the power cables and not a second too soon, I could hear the demons scratching on the otherside.

Can anyone who hasn't exceeded their daily lysergide dose provide advice?
Seriously though, I think your question does kind of contradict itself. Maybe just a misunderstanding of the purpose of the wall box?

The idea of a wall box with patch panels is to run ALL the cables from the various places you may have devices to a central point. Then from this central point you can distribute those links to the correct place by patching them.

Inside the wall box you can of course use a switch to combine everything onto a single cable, but that isn't going to eliminate any cables coming in or needing to be patched.
 
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Would but i'm still confused

Are you trying to avoid running 20 cables to 20 machines or are you trying to avoid 20 cables from patch panel to switch?
For the confusion, see attached lysergide comment.

Also, I am hoping to avoid running 15 cables to 15 machines. That would be approximately 500metres of cable. Whereas I could get away with 100m using the switches.
 
Joined
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Seriously though, I think your question does kind of contradict itself. Maybe just a misunderstanding of the purpose of the wall box?

The idea of a wall box with patch panels is to run ALL the cables from the various places you may have devices to a central point. Then from this central point you can distribute those links to the correct place by patching them.

Inside the wall box you can of course use a switch to combine everything onto a single cable, but that isn't going to eliminate any cables coming in or needing to be patched.
Okay so I see what you're getting at. What I am trying to do, is run two cables maximum from the wallbox to each switch, and from those switches use 1m patch cords to each device.
 

Light

Active Member
Joined
Aug 27, 2004
Messages
63
Okay so I see what you're getting at. What I am trying to do, is run two cables maximum from the wallbox to each switch, and from those switches use 1m patch cords to each device.
If it were me I'd run the 500m of cable. Cable is less likely to break than extra switches. It also means you have a single central point to troubleshoot from.

More work up front for less issues later on.
 

PsyWulf

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Nov 22, 2006
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For the confusion, see attached lysergide comment.
Not particularly handy when looking for help,I wasn't being snide or slow,your wording was taxing to read at best ;)

Also, I am hoping to avoid running 15 cables to 15 machines. That would be approximately 500metres of cable. Whereas I could get away with 100m using the switches.

So you want to break away from centralizing your cables using patch panels and switches in 1 location and build a "mesh" network basically

I've done similar for small networks,small 8 port hubs situated at work desk sections with 2 cables running to central switches ( 1 not connected of course,redundancy in case the cable bites the dirt )
 
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Feb 29, 2012
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Okay maybe this will help...

I have:

4 x 8port switches
1 x adsl router
1 x server
10 x desktops
2 x laptops
4 x printers
1 x wallbox with patchpanels
1 x access to cabling, a crimper, lots of plugs, a drill, glue and free time.

How do I connect them?
 

PsyWulf

Executive Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2006
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Draw a pic of office layout ^

If you do decide to go "mesh" architecture it's easiest with clusters of machines

Are the 8 port switches gigabit?
 

PsyWulf

Executive Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2006
Messages
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So... feel free to shoot me right about now, but I have realised where the confusion has arisen from...

When I said "wallbox"... What I actually meant to say was...

"Patch-panel rack enclosed in glass box housing"...
Ahaaaaaaaa
 
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