What is the most difficult programming language to learn?

Jamie McKane

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In your opinion, which is the most most difficult programming language to learn? Why?
 

Batista

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Any decent developer can switch between different languages. Languages all all different ends to goals, I would say the hardest are the low level languages such as assembler.Any modern high level language are very easy to learn thanks the the huge fancy IDE's.
 

The_Librarian

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Assembly language.

Because you have to build every single thing yourself. Languages like BASIC, Pascal, C/C++ etc is much easier to learn since you don't have to write out reams of code just to print "Hello World" on the monitor/printer/smartphone/whatever.
 

Werfetter

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I would say brainfu ck, only has eight distinct characters and the syntax is obfuscated to the point where you might as well just use something else.

Hello world in Brain***** looks like this:

++++++++++[>+++++++>++++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]>++.>+.+++++++
..+++.>++.<<+++++++++++++++.>.+++.------.--------.>+.>.
 

RedViking

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Honest question from someone that is not a developer. Are there people that still use low-level programming language and why?
 

Messugga

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Honest question from someone that is not a developer. Are there people that still use low-level programming language and why?

Yes. Because it gives you a hell of a lot of control - sometimes more than you would have access to in a higher level language. It's often important if you have very tight resource constraints or require very exact execution, such as for scientific purposes.
 

vic777

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Honest question from someone that is not a developer. Are there people that still use low-level programming language and why?

Yes, of course. High level languages are not suited to every application. If you write low level device driver code or something that is very mission critical in terms of performance, or realtime systems, or embedded systems - you'd still use assembly

I also think that every programmer *has* to do assembly at some point in your studies - it teaches you how the processor, the registers and memory works
 

Batista

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Honest question from someone that is not a developer. Are there people that still use low-level programming language and why?

Yes, to connect with specific pieces of hardware, you need to go down to that level.
 

Batista

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I would say brainfu ck, only has eight distinct characters and the syntax is obfuscated to the point where you might as well just use something else.

Hello world in Brain***** looks like this:

Honestly to me this isnt a language.Even assembler makes more sense than this.
 

vic777

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Honestly to me this isnt a language.Even assembler makes more sense than this.

From the wiki page:
While it is fully Turing-complete, it is not intended for practical use, but to challenge and amuse programmers.

I took this thread to refer to programming languages in commercial use as well
 

Werfetter

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Honestly to me this isnt a language.Even assembler makes more sense than this.

Haha well Brain**** does not consider you to be human. :p but seriously, on what do you base the assertion that it is not a programming language?

Sure it is not used commercially but that does not subtract from it's value and contributions to the field. If you look at something like Malbolge that is specifically built to be impossible to develop a program in is still valuable as far as research goes.

From the wiki page:
While it is fully Turing-complete, it is not intended for practical use, but to challenge and amuse programmers.

I took this thread to refer to programming languages in commercial use as well

Even learning a programming language that is not used commercially still has value. Learning the weird and obfuscated syntax might give you a perspective to problem solving you have not had before which has value.
 

Drifter

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Honest question from someone that is not a developer. Are there people that still use low-level programming language and why?

Yes, if you need to access specific CICS regions or addresses for instance.
 

vic777

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Even learning a programming language that is not used commercially still has value. Learning the weird and obfuscated syntax might give you a perspective to problem solving you have not had before which has value.

I agree 100%
 

Batista

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Haha well Brain**** does not consider you to be human. :p but seriously, on what do you base the assertion that it is not a programming language?

Sure it is not used commercially but that does not subtract from it's value and contributions to the field. If you look at something like Malbolge that is specifically built to be impossible to develop a program in is still valuable as far as research goes.



Even learning a programming language that is not used commercially still has value. Learning the weird and obfuscated syntax might give you a perspective to problem solving you have not had before which has value.

Your last point.Amen!
Thanks for showing me the light.
 

garp

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In everyday practical use of a language that real people will probably encounter at some point, I'd say C or C++ is actually the most difficult - not necessarily to get going initially, but to ultimately master, or at least achieve a level of sophistication/elegance.
 
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