What's for supper - Second Course

cerebus

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
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35,901
:laugh::laugh: would love your recipe if you don't mind sharing. Bone broth is my main interest but it's worth making a lot and freezing it so Pho might be on the menu.
Well pho is a whole different recipe from normal bone broth, so you need to get a bunch of possibly unfamiliar ingredients. But it's incredibly delicious. The basic stock is quite flexible but it can include things like star anise, rock sugar, lemongrass, ginger, onions, etc.


For a more traditional bone broth you should use standard aromatics like celery, onion, parsley, carrots, peppercorns, apple cider vinegar, bay leaves, leeks, etc. Roughly chop the vegetables and roast them with the bones for 15 minutes or so on a pan tossed with olive oil. Bring to boil in a large stock pot then turn it down as low as possible and simmer for up to 12 hours. You could also use a slow cooker on low heat; it's fine but the water should get to boiling first.

Every few hours you'll want to skim off the top with a slotted spoon to get rid of the scummy residue that forms. Then let it cool and strain it through a cheesecloth or a kitchen towel. Personally I prefer not to salt my broths, as I use them in all kinds of different recipes and I want to manage the salting on that end.

Previously I used to collect and freeze kitchen scraps to use in my broths. The cutoffs from onions, celery, leeks and carrots have a lot of flavour. I had a bunch of 1-cup plastic bakkies from Plastics 4 Africa that I'd ladle the stock into and freeze for later use.
 

maumau

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 13, 2009
Messages
13,174
Well pho is a whole different recipe from normal bone broth, so you need to get a bunch of possibly unfamiliar ingredients. But it's incredibly delicious. The basic stock is quite flexible but it can include things like star anise, rock sugar, lemongrass, ginger, onions, etc.


For a more traditional bone broth you should use standard aromatics like celery, onion, parsley, carrots, peppercorns, apple cider vinegar, bay leaves, leeks, etc. Roughly chop the vegetables and roast them with the bones for 15 minutes or so on a pan tossed with olive oil. Bring to boil in a large stock pot then turn it down as low as possible and simmer for up to 12 hours. You could also use a slow cooker on low heat; it's fine but the water should get to boiling first.

Every few hours you'll want to skim off the top with a slotted spoon to get rid of the scummy residue that forms. Then let it cool and strain it through a cheesecloth or a kitchen towel. Personally I prefer not to salt my broths, as I use them in all kinds of different recipes and I want to manage the salting on that end.

Previously I used to collect and freeze kitchen scraps to use in my broths. The cutoffs from onions, celery, leeks and carrots have a lot of flavour. I had a bunch of 1-cup plastic bakkies from Plastics 4 Africa that I'd ladle the stock into and freeze for later use.
Sounds delicious. Will go with your portion size for freezing. This weekend is broth, I'm not a slow-cooker fan so will use the biggest pot available.

I have all the ingredients called for in the pho recipe (except rock sugar) so will probably give it a try sometime, yum.

EDIT: Recipe says you can substitute brown sugar, which I've got :)
 

cerebus

Honorary Master
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
35,901
Sounds delicious. Will go with your portion size for freezing. This weekend is broth, I'm not a slow-cooker fan so will use the biggest pot available.

I have all the ingredients called for in the pho recipe so will probably give it a try sometime, yum.
Yeah pho is amazing. Once you have the broth, you can basically add anything you want in there. I like to thinly slice up a raw sirloin steak and have hoisin sauce, cilantro, bean sprouts, oriental mushrooms, etc. But the world's your oyster. Oh, oysters could work too.
 
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