WirelessG in-flight Wi-Fi meltdown explained

The math does not make sense. Roughly 300 devices trying to connect? Did they invite tech savvy people from all over? Was the maiden flight's wifi service provided for free? I can't see how everyone on the flight payed R50 for access.
 
Looks like a case of poor capacity planning, especially if you inviting "techie" people on a maiden flight to test the new WiFi. Its progress nonetheless and I am sure many lessons learned, and look forward to trying it out on my next Mango flight to Cape town if available.
 
Short and sweet – the system was abused in terms of the ‘technical budget’,” said van der Merwe.

Chicken or beef, and would you like a FUP with that?

IMO 124 ip's for passenger use doesn't make it sound like broadband at all.
 
more than enough IP's... It was a test flight so everyone (including all the media) brought every device they own

under normal circumstances it would be fine
 
Lol DHCP failure. Well, now if you are on a WiFi enabled plane and want to crash it you cant try and be creative with this.
 
This scenario is unlikely to occur in a real world environment where only a portion of the passengers per flight will use one or two devices to access the Internet.

And BillG said 640k was enough...

Yeah right.
 
Short and sweet – the system was abused in terms of the ‘technical budget’,” said van der Merwe.

Why is it that whenever the providers don't plan properly, the user gets blamed for "abuse"??
 
I am glad i am not the person who organised that fiasco :D
 
Soon they're gonna start talking about tolling airways... e-cloud gantries, etc etc.
 
Complete failure. They have zero planning abilities - how can 115 passengers take down the system, even if they had multiple devices. Who built that system??!
 
Complete failure. They have zero planning abilities - how can 115 passengers take down the system, even if they had multiple devices. Who built that system??!

1 3g dongle connection shared to everyone? :whistling:
 
Complete failure. They have zero planning abilities - how can 115 passengers take down the system, even if they had multiple devices. Who built that system??!

Come on, should have been more than enough. 124 addresses would never have been used up under normal circumstances. They'd also need a huge internet pipe to accommodate even that number. It's not a planning thing, it's simply not rational to expect any more than they did.
 
Looks like a case of poor capacity planning, especially if you inviting "techie" people on a maiden flight to test the new WiFi. Its progress nonetheless and I am sure many lessons learned, and look forward to trying it out on my next Mango flight to Cape town if available.
Most definitely agree with you. Despite probably not going to happen under normal circumstances, this was a media launch-type event. It would be nice to get a technical reply to state why they "had" to limit the devices to half a subnet. Maybe we are missing something...
 
And nobody thought to limit these guys to one toy at a time? Tsk...
 
WirelessG in-flight Wi-Fi meltdown explained

The maiden Mango in-flight Wi-Fi voyage in South Africa was a disaster when the system buckled under the load. WirelessG explains.

“Passengers also resubmitted multiple requests on multiple devices. All these requests from a ‘tech hungry’ crowd caused massive congestion with time-outs as a result. Short and sweet – the system was abused in terms of the ‘technical budget’,” said van der Merwe.

Sure, abuse when they fail. Not abuse when they succeed. Maybe a little hindsight next time would help. You'd be really daft if you know you are going to have 200 people and you only make room for 202 devices...

Looks like a case of poor capacity planning, especially if you inviting "techie" people on a maiden flight to test the new WiFi. Its progress nonetheless and I am sure many lessons learned, and look forward to trying it out on my next Mango flight to Cape town if available.
That.
 
Back
Top