Dangerous security flaws found in Windows 10

WalkWithMe

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Dec 10, 2016
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You know stuff used to come in a box, you bought it, installed it, and it worked. Nothing was inherently broken or flawed or required updates to keep it working. If you wanted the latest version, you went and bought it, but the old version didn't stop working if you didn't.
The stuff in the box often had bugs and you had to wait years for a fix. Now we get the fix, waterfall dev is dead or dying, agile is the way forward...
 

Nick333

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You know stuff used to come in a box, you bought it, installed it, and it worked. Nothing was inherently broken or flawed or required updates to keep it working. If you wanted the latest version, you went and bought it, but the old version didn't stop working if you didn't.
No one's stopping you from running Word Perfect on DOS or Windows 1.x.
 

_TrXtR_

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Jul 11, 2006
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You know stuff used to come in a box, you bought it, installed it, and it worked. Nothing was inherently broken or flawed or required updates to keep it working. If you wanted the latest version, you went and bought it, but the old version didn't stop working if you didn't.
Yeah those were the days... simple applications.
Those were like single exe files that contained most of the functionality, now we have thousands of modules with thousands of standards and requirements to do the similar things. It's just not the same level.
 

ponder

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You know stuff used to come in a box, you bought it, installed it, and it worked. Nothing was inherently broken or flawed or required updates to keep it working. If you wanted the latest version, you went and bought it, but the old version didn't stop working if you didn't.
Well then disconnect your PC from the network and you will be fine just like in the old days. If the stuff from days gone by were connected to the internet you would have way more vulnerabilities than modern software, security was not even a concern back then and not catered for.
 

Swa

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Takes out WinXP

Much as I hate to admit it.... win7 due to M$ negligence has become dead in the water and the corpse has started to rot.
Should have had a service pack ages go. It's the first OS not to have had multiple updates since they started with this short lived cycles to force people on their newer systems.

Show me ANY software that has zero bugs...? Its the nature of the beast unluckily.

ps: You don't have to use Windows ... you can use something else.
Actually a good question, why is it that that bugs have become so common that's it's acceptable to release something without doing any testing that would have pointed out the obvious flaws? I used to play console games and they just worked. They had to as there isn't exactly a way to patch cartridges if you could even get hold of said patches. With boxed versions there were usually like one or two non critical patches at most. It's only with the advent of Steam that you'd now be lucky if you get sold a game that even functions without patches. It's got absolutely nothing to do with complexity but rather an infectious culture that's taken over where it's suddenly acceptable to release alpha versions riddled with bugs to the public so they can point out where the flaws are rather than first finding those yourself and fixing them. Most people don't even know the hundreds of times their games get updated. Unfortunately this has now moved over to Windows as well. That's the only thing that can explain the constant GB's of updates being thrown at people. A properly tested OS should have 1GB of updates at most over its lifetime and most of them should be security updates and not common issues.

Well then disconnect your PC from the network and you will be fine just like in the old days. If the stuff from days gone by were connected to the internet you would have way more vulnerabilities than modern software, security was not even a concern back then and not catered for.
Not so actually. The more complex software becomes the more vulnerabilities it has. It's quite easy to make an OS that only tells you 'good' when you ask 'how are you?' 100% secure but not so on a system with thousands of bloatware.
 

Zoomzoom

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Aug 15, 2014
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5,252
Actually a good question, why is it that that bugs have become so common that's it's acceptable to release something without doing any testing that would have pointed out the obvious flaws? I used to play console games and they just worked. They had to as there isn't exactly a way to patch cartridges if you could even get hold of said patches. With boxed versions there were usually like one or two non critical patches at most. It's only with the advent of Steam that you'd now be lucky if you get sold a game that even functions without patches. It's got absolutely nothing to do with complexity but rather an infectious culture that's taken over where it's suddenly acceptable to release alpha versions riddled with bugs to the public so they can point out where the flaws are rather than first finding those yourself and fixing them. Most people don't even know the hundreds of times their games get updated. Unfortunately this has now moved over to Windows as well.
I think you may find that it started with windows and migrated from there, but yes this is the point I was making - stuff used to work, and if sometimes it didn't, the problem wasn't a major flaw that broke other stuff like the entire computer, as happens with windows.

Apparently Win 3.1 was when the rot really set in and when this arrived:

1565804982993.png
 
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