How does Windows Server CALs affect Remote Desktop and Shared Folders?

Saajid

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What are Windows Server CALs actually used for?

If I have a Windows Network (no domain or AD, just a Workgroup) of 40 users, how do the CALs come into play? If I have a CAL for 5 users, what does it actually mean? What is restricted to 5 users?

Does it mean a maximum of 5 concurrent RDP users? Or a maximum of 5 concurrent users browsing/connecting to shared files and folders?

Can someone with some knowledge please help me out here. Google has been very friendly to me (yes I tried, that was my first stop).
 

Space_Cowboy

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CAL's apply either to "per device" or "per user"

When a client connect's to your Terminal Server a CAL depending which mode it operates in is issued to it.

CAL is required for basicly each client connection.
 

Grep

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You only need CALS if your workstations connect to a server, whether it being for AD or RDP etc.
 

Saajid

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There is no domain or Active Directory. Just a simple Windows network with a single Workgroup.

How many CALs would I need for 40 users?
 

TheGuy

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40 CALs, as far as I know CAL means Client Access Licence so even in a workgroup your clients are still accessing the server.
 

Elvis007

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If all 40 pc's are accessing the server shares you will need 40 device or user CALs. Maybe read up on the difference between those 2 and then make your choice. Then, if you have a terminal server you will need another CAL just for that for each client. (These CAL's you load onto the TS Server Licensing Service)
 

Saajid

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Are the CALs enforced? Because we have a new client that has only 5 CALs, but about 40 users, and they don't seem to be having any problems with accessing shared files/folders (RDP is restricted to a maximum of 5 concurrent users). I have a feeling that the server doesn't enforce the licensing conditions. The client doesn't have AD or a domain, just a simple Windows network.
 

Grep

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Again, you only need CALS if you access a server, not a workstation. Only 10 machines max can connect to a XP box, unless you do a registry hack, but lets pretend I don't know about that. If you want a T/S type box which only supports max 3 RDP connections, there is also a registry hack, which we don't know about. Then you can also turn off the licensing service, which we don't know about and finally 2008 SBS has no license server because the licensing service is just plain crap. So lets just say in a nutshell, you should have CALS if you want to be legal. Sorry, what was the question again?
 

Saajid

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Sorry, what was the question again?
Are the CALs enforced?
Sarcasm aside, my question still stands. Are the CALs enforced? I ask this in relation to Windows Server 2008, set up as a workgroup, with about 40 users accessing shared folders on the server. I'm not talking about accessing files on a Workstation. CALs don't apply to Windows XP/7, just Windows Server.

My question also relates to doing things the legal way, so ignore all registry hacks, cracks and other tricks you can do to bypass licensing restrictions.
 

RVQ

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Sarcasm aside, my question still stands. Are the CALs enforced? I ask this in relation to Windows Server 2008, set up as a workgroup, with about 40 users accessing shared folders on the server. I'm not talking about accessing files on a Workstation. CALs don't apply to Windows XP/7, just Windows Server.

My question also relates to doing things the legal way, so ignore all registry hacks, cracks and other tricks you can do to bypass licensing restrictions.
Enforced by the BSA when they dragging the CEO/CIO away...
 

RVQ

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So not enforced by Windows itself, by actual code. It is enforced through legal avenues.
Depends some are technically enforced others aren't. To my knowledge SBS and Terminal Services enforces licensing
 
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