Mahindra XUV300

FiestaST

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Mahindra XUV300

The new Mahindra XUV300 has been revealed, with a high-ranking official from the Indian automaker already confirming it will be launched in South Africa early in 2019.

The new XUV300 – which earlier went by the internal codename S201 – interestingly employs the Ssangyong Tivoli’s underpinnings, although is shorter overall than that vehicle.

It is expected to compete against the likes of the Hyundai Creta, Ford EcoSport and Suzuki Vitara. Although powertrain options have yet to be announced, reports suggest the XUV300 will be offered with a turbocharged 1,2-litre petrol engine and a 1,5-litre turbodiesel unit.

Dr Pawan Goenka, managing director at Mahindra & Mahindra, told IndianAutosBlog the new model’s launch would take place in India and South Africa “nearly simultaneously”.

It’s not yet clear whether Mahindra SA would consider assembling the latest model at its new assembly plant in KwaZulu-Natal (which currently churns out the Pik Up in both single- and double-cab body styles) or fully import it.

In India, the new XUV300 crossover will be offered with 17-inch alloys, LED taillamps, dual-zone automatic climate control, seven airbags, a sunroof, parking sensors, a reversing camera and a touchscreen-based infotainment system.

https://www.carmag.co.za/news/new-mahindra-xuv300-revealed-and-its-heading-to-sa/

XUV300 1.jpgXUV300 2.jpgXUV300 3.jpg
 

Ockie

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Looks nice. Glad to see they now have the gear lever in the normal position.
 

FiestaST

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Mahindra takes aim at EcoSport with new XUV300

Indian brand Mahindra has released photos and information on its new compact crossover, dubbed the XUV300. It is currently under consideration for a South African introduction, possibly towards the end of Q1 in 2019.

The compact crossover segment continues to be a major focus area for all brands, and it's easy to understand why – increasingly shoppers are abandoning regular hatchbacks and sedans for these versatile and stylish offerings. The market is currently dominated by the likes of the Ford EcoSport and Hyundai Creta, but now Indian giant Mahindra, a brand that is very much on the roll in the South Africa, looks set to join in on the action with its new XUV300.

A stylish offering with crisp, modern lines, the targeted starting price for the newcomer is below R300 000. It is built on Mahindra's new X100 monocoque platform (shared with the SsangYong Tivoli) and will be powered by petrol (likely 1.2-litre turbo) and diesel (reportedly a 1.5L) engines, with an all-electric variant also becoming available in some markets. While local features and specification remain unconfirmed, it will be available (in India at least) with items such as an electric sunroof, up to 7 airbags and dual-zone climate control.

Officially the XUV300 is not yet confirmed for South Africa but a report in India states that it will be launched here "nearly simultaneously" with India.

https://www.cars.co.za/motoring_news/mahindra-takes-aim-at-ecosport-with-new-xuv300/45946/

Pic.JPG
 

FiestaST

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Mahindra to rival EcoSport in SA with Ssangyong-based baby SUV

Mahindra, just like the Ssangyong brand that it owns, is not exactly known for its design finesse, but you have to admit that its latest creation is a neat little thing by comparison.

The first ever XUV300 was created to take on the Ford EcoSport and Renault Captur, and it looks set to reach South Africa soon.

At the compact SUV’s unveiling event in India, Mahindra’s Managing Director Dr Pawan Goenka told IndianAutosBlog that the XUV300’s Indian and South African launches would take place “almost simultaneously”, and that’s likely to be around February 2019, according to the publication.
The XUV300 is based on the Ssangyong Tivoli, but is slightly shorter, with its overall length dropping to just below four metres in order to qualify for Indian tax incentives.

The Mahindra version has its own unique styling and it appears it’s engines will be unique too.

Although the powertrain line-up has yet to be officially confirmed, many sources are speculating that customers will get to choose between a 1.2-litre turbopetrol and 1.5-litre turbodiesel. That’s likely to be the same 1.5 TD that powers the TUV300, which produces 74kW and 240Nm, which sounds just about right for a vehicle of that size.
Although there will almost certainly be a wide range of model grades, as Mahindra is known for, top models appear well equipped with touchscreen infotainment, dual-zone climate control, push-button start and leather upholstery.

It's too early to comment on local pricing, but it is worth noting that the XUV300 is priced slightly above the Ford EcoSport in India, according to reports.

https://www.iol.co.za/motoring/latest-launches/mahindra-to-rival-ecosport-in-sa-with-ssangyong-based-baby-suv-18583947
 

Azg

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Mahindra to rival EcoSport in SA with Ssangyong-based baby SUV

Mahindra, just like the Ssangyong brand that it owns, is not exactly known for its design finesse, but you have to admit that its latest creation is a neat little thing by comparison.

......
It's too early to comment on local pricing, but it is worth noting that the XUV300 is priced slightly above the Ford EcoSport in India, according to reports.

https://www.iol.co.za/motoring/latest-launches/mahindra-to-rival-ecosport-in-sa-with-ssangyong-based-baby-suv-18583947
Nice looking tiny SUV!. But if it is indeed priced higher than the Ford Ecosport then they won't be selling that many in SA.
 

Ivan Leon

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Presenting the Cheetah-inspired Mahindra XUV300!

The perfect combination of thrilling performance, class defining interiors, best in class safety & first in class hi tech features to set the roads on fire. Catch the 1st glimpse of the Mahindra XUV300!

 

FiestaST

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Mahindra XUV300 (2019) International Launch Review

The all-new Mahindra XUV300 is on its way and will reach South Africa at the end of the 1st quarter of 2019. We travelled to India to experience the newcomer on its home turf and, judging by our first impression of the "3 Double Oh", Mahindra could well become a force to be reckoned with in the fiercely-contested compact family car segment...

As we sit in the departure lounge at Chennai Airport and take stock of the past few days with Mahindra, there's a strong feeling of positivity. We all love an underdog story and Mahindra’s past has been chequered in South Africa. Mahindra not only suffers from the same perception problem as the Chinese marques (customers are wary of new/unproven brands in the local market), it's largely viewed as a maker of "rudimentary off-roaders".

However, Mahindra South Africa believes it is now well-positioned: an ever-growing number of customers are willing to "take the plunge" with a new Mahindra. Buoyed by some credible sales success in our market, it has undertaken an expansion programme. It's interesting to note that in January 2019, Mahindra SA outsold Honda, Jaguar Land Rover, Volvo, and Opel. Some of the success can be attributed to the launch of the updated budget-friendly KUV100 Nxt and Mahindra Finance, which offers enticing deals. The Pik-Up bakkie is also achieving considerable sales success.

Enter the XUV300

First things first: the new model's name is pronounced XUV 3 Double Oh, not XUV 3 hundred. The new offering from Mahindra plays in an extremely competitive space and will be going head-to-head with the likes of the Ford EcoSport, Hyundai Creta, Haval H2 and the #CarsAwards-winning Suzuki Vitara (to name just a few examples). Given the standard of the competition, it'll have to be good. Is it? Read on and find out.

Let's now talk about the newcomer's looks. With a purposeful, contemporary and, in our opinion, instantly-likeable design, the XUV300 isn't burdened with its predecessor's love-it-or-hate-it exterior execution. Instead, it has a fresh, simple design devoid of chintzy paraphernalia. At the front, it sports eye-catching daytime running lights and you can readily expect heightened kerb appeal to become a defining characteristic of future Mahindras. Evidently, the Indian company makes the most of its 76% stake in Italian design house Pininfarina, which it acquired back in 2015.

The XUV300 is based on the Mahindra X100 platform and shares some tech with the SsangYong Tivoli. Mahindra owns 74.65% of the Korean manufacturer and while there are some similarities and overlaps between the XUV and the Tivoli (of which its predecessor was once under consideration for SA), the design and engines are exclusive to Mahindra. Speaking of engines, there are 2 options available. First up is a 1.5 CRDI 4-cylinder turbodiesel engine with outputs of 85 kW and 300 Nm. The next engine is a 1.2-litre turbocharged 3-cylinder petrol unit, which produces 82 kW and 200 Nm. Both engines are mated with 6-speed manual gearboxes, but there's talk that automatic versions will come at a later stage.

What's it like to drive?

We had the chance to drive the top-spec 1.5-litre turbodiesel version and we were blown away by the specification. The cabin is neatly laid out and feels solidly assembled (although we hope the beige-coloured interior will be replaced by a dark grey trim in SA-spec units). The infotainment system is operated by a 7-inch touchscreen and is complemented by a pair of USB ports, Android Auto and Apple CarPlay compatibility, satellite navigation... and there's even an app for smartwatch integration. It's safe too, with 7 airbags, ABS with EBD, disk brakes all round and stability control. In terms of comfort features for the top-spec version, 3-mode adaptive steering (it allows you to adjust the steering feel), dual-zone climate control, park sensors (front and rear), a reverse-view camera, auto wipers, cruise control, keyless start and a start/stop system are fitted.

Our test drive of the new XUV300 took place in the tropical holiday province of Goa. The benefits of these roads range from less traffic to more dynamic surfaces and corners. Driving in some of the big cities like Chennai and Mumbai is not for the faint-hearted (if you've never done it before), but our route through Goa was much quieter and allowed us to evaluate the claim that the XUV300 is "the most dynamic offering in its segment".

Initially, we were a mite sceptical about the claim... "Dynamic" is one of those buzzwords marketing execs use to convince the media (and public) that their brands' latest sensible/practical offerings are not boring to drive. Surprisingly, with its steering feedback set to Sport, which offers a meaty feel through the tiller, the XUV300 felt appreciably agile (but not at the cost of poise) when we hustled it along some windy roads around the beach area of Palolem. It's not sporty per se, but at least engages the driver and rewards enthusiastic driving to an extent. The steering is reassuringly direct and, when switched to Comfort, light and lovely to wield in driving situations where tight parking manoeuvres would need to be executed.

The ride quality (given the varied qualities of road surfaces and 17-inch alloy wheels) was particularly impressive. The suspension is firm, but at no point did it crash over any uneven ruts or corrugations in the road. Quality is a critical word in our brand-sensitive market and some people may have preconceived notions that the Mahindra is marginal in that regard. That couldn't be further from the truth, as this latest offering from the Indian firm demonstrates you can get excellent build quality, finishes and refinement from a brand that is not Japanese, Korean or European. Despite our test unit being driven all week by motoring journalists, it showed no sign of wear and tear, and the cabin was vault-quiet. Mahindra representatives revealed NVH suppression was a key pillar of the XUV's development: making the cabin as quiet and refined as possible was a critical objective.

The turbodiesel powertrain proved intriguing. Unlike some diesel engines in this segment, which are loud and clattery, this powerplant is quite quiet and refined. While the maximum power output (85 kW) is on par for the segment, 300 Nm of torque is exceptionally useful for in-gear overtaking, something we did a lot of on our test route. Once you're past that peak torque plateau, the dropoff is evident even before the redline. This could be a small cause for concern, but the 6-speed manual gearbox comes to the rescue. Not only is it light and easy to use, but the ratios are engineered to make the most of the engine's perkiness. If you feel you're running out of puff, simply drop a gear and the car will surge forward.

On our test route, we frequently found ourselves needing to overtake slower traffic and the turbodiesel engine was sufficiently responsive to execute those manoeuvres with ease. The real acid test will be to see how the car responds on the open road, where the 80-120 kph test is critical in our market. In India, there are few opportunities to reach 100 kph given the congested traffic and sometimes tricky road conditions. For those who like to venture off the tarmac and indulge in a spot of gravel grinding, the Mahindra XUV300 boasts 180 mm of ground clearance, which is useful.

Which XUV300 Will SA Get?

While final pricing and specification for the range are yet to be confirmed, we've been told that the local market will probably see the introduction of 3 spec levels, with the new model's launch expected around April 2019. Mahindra Global regards the South African introduction of the XUV300 so seriously, that it has sent some units to Mzansi to undergo accelerated durability testing to make sure that the newcomer's suitable for our market.

First impressions count for so much and we're happy to say that the Mahindra XUV300 delivers great build quality, generous features and a refined drive all around. Pricing will be critical and given where its rivals play, we think that Mahindra will come in with an aggressive strategy right from the get-go. No longer should the word "affordable" be automatically associated with "poor quality". We expect that the top-spec derivative will cost around the R300 000 mark, which undercuts its competition significantly and, hopefully, we won't lose too much in the way of spec. We can't wait to evaluate the new XUV300 on local soil and if our first drive is anything to go by, the XUV300 will find its way into several South African homes.

https://www.cars.co.za/motoring_news/mahindra-xuv300-2019-international-launch-review/46076/

XUV300 1.jpgXUV300 2.JPGXUV300 3.JPGXUV300 4.JPGXUV300 5.JPGXUV300 6.JPG
 

Ivan Leon

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Mahindra XUV 300 Review | NDTV carandbike

The SsangYong-Mahindra partnership has brought in another new model, which could prove to be the next big thing in the subcompact SUV segment in India.

Yes! We are talking about the Mahindra XUV300, based on the SsangYong Tivoli. It will be going up against the likes of the Maruti Suzuki Vitara Brezza, Tata Nexon and the Ford EcoSport.

It is a promising product and here is our first impression of the newest Mahindra model, which we drove in Goa.

 

FiestaST

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Mahindra: No longer a bargain-hunter’s brand in SA

A decade ago the South African market was awash in Chinese and Indian bakkies, with new brands seemingly launching product each quarter.

It appeared that some traditional bakkie manufacturers were at risk of having their cheaper derivates made redundant, by this uncontained march of affordability from continental Asia.

Brand trading credibility

Over time, though, most of these brands have disappeared from the local market, with only a few proving to have the quality to endure. One of those has been Mahindra, which can rightly claim its presence in the local market, after a stellar 2018.

Marketing a blend of crossovers, SUVs and bakkies, Mahindra is now effectively the only Indian automotive brand trading with any credibility in South Africa, after its rival, Tata, has seen sales almost entirely collapse.

Despite a torrid 2018 for the local automotive market, with a total contraction of 1%, Mahindra avoided any trace of that trend in its own business, by ending 2018 with cumulative sales increasing 26%, year-on-year.

Those numbers quantified to a market presence of 5486 units. Anchoring Mahindra’s Mzansi business are its bakkies, which are now considered a credible alternative for anyone shopping around the R300 000 price point.

No longer a stop-gap

Having established its presence in the local bakkie market with Bolero (a R200 000 price point proposition), acceptance for the more expensive and advanced Scorpio Pik Up is evidence of Mahindra no longer being considered merely a bargain buy stop-gap.

Last month the brand sold a total of 350 bakkies and the proportion of Bolero to Scorpio Pik Up vindicates this assumption.

Dissecting the Mahindra bakkie sales numbers, only 19% were the more affordable Bolero, with a balance of 76% being the more expensive Scorpio, with the remainder, a smidge over 4%, accreted to Genio.

The serves as clear evidence that Mahindra bakkie buyers are no longer simple bargain hunters, looking for the cheapest way to move things around.

Beyond its healthy bakkie business, Mahindra’s combined SUV/utility market presence has it ranking ahead of some recognised brand names in South Africa.

In January, Mahindra delivered a total of 644 new vehicles to South African owners, which classified it as a larger presence than Honda, Opel and Mitsubishi.

Testament to the confidence of Mahindra are its Karoo edition Scorpio Pik Up bakkies, revealed late last year, with another derivate announced this month.

The company’s SUV offering should be bolstered soon, too, with the arrival of its most sophisticated vehicle yet, the XUV300.

Many continental Asian vehicle manufacturers have tried and failed to convince the South African bakkie buying public of their abilities over the last decade.

Mahindra, by contrast, has grown. Appreciably. To a point where it is on the cusp of becoming one of South Africa’s top ten automotive brands.

https://www.wheels24.co.za/News/SA_vehicle_sales/mahindra-no-longer-a-bargain-hunters-brand-in-sa-20190207
 

FiestaST

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Headed for SA: Here's why you’ll be pleasantly surprised by Mahindra's XUV300

Mahindra has moved from obscurity in the local market to being a real player in the automotive industry. Over the past 10 years, the brand has evolved from "bargain-hunter" status to be able to take on more established automakers with competitive offerings.

It's the latest model, the XUV300, launched in sunny Goa, India, that raises the bar that much higher for future Mahindra products, as it’s simply a surprisingly good compact SUV offering.

SA-bound XUV300

Locally, the new SUV will be available, says Mahindra SA, in three variants.

They will be mechanically the same and most likely the same nomenclature as other Mahindra products (W8, W6 and W8). Durability testing for South Africa began in November 2018 and is set to conclude later this month.

The arrival of the XUV300 is set for Q1 (possibly April) 2019 with SA-specifications and details to be revealed closer to the local launch.

And the price? Well, Mahindra says "pricing to be confirmed but will be aggressive".

In short, Mahindra's new XUV300 gets a whole lot right for an SUV: A host of cool features, quality of materials and a comfortable daily drive that's also capable of karting a small family around on weekends. Scorpio Pik-Up, XUV500, KUV100… Mahindra automotive is, as its marketing material suggests, on the "rise"...

Driving it

What's it like to drive? The XUV300 makes for a pleasantly surprising experience behind the wheel.

Driving in India is an eye-opening experience; it's amazing the perspective you gain when a two-lane road suddenly serves six vehicles abreast, all vying for the right of way.

Curiously, it seems to work for Indian motorists, as they're simply driving the way high school learners would navigate a school hallway: Jockey for position, shove ahead and hope for the best.

In an environment where lanes are ignored, indicators rarely used, and obeying the rules of the road optional, you'll need a vehicle that's capable of handling any task.

If the XUV300 can deal with India's bizarre, claustrophobic and chaotic road network, it should be able to handle South African routes with ease.

Its engines, especially the diesel, are incredibly refined, making powertrains featured in rival products (read: EcoSport and Creta) seem ancient by comparison.

The XUV300 can be powered with a choice of 1.2-litre petrol and a 1.5-litre diesel.

The diesel proved to be yet another pleasant surprise as, the moment your foot steps on the throttle, you're greeted to a swell of torque, handy when you require power during city driving.

Its 6-speed gearbox works very well. The torque does taper off toward the top-end but, according to Mahindra, that is not where the engine revs need to be (read: taking gaps in chaotic Indian traffic).

There's plenty of power available for sudden overtaking within a city. The ride quality is excellent, and the engines smooth and steering effortless though lacking in feedback.

The clutch is light, a boon considering its family-orientated target market, and gearshifts are surprisingly smooth and effortless.

I've used the word "surprising" before and, if you've ever driven a first-generation Mahindra product, you'll understand what I mean as, overall, the XUV300 is a very agile, easy car to drive, perfect for "urbanites" who participate in the occasional weekend road trip and a vast improvement over its previous products.

The XUV300's ride quality is excellent and able to soak up bumps and undulations with ease, and handle corners at brisk(ish) pace.

It delivers a pliant ride, soaking up nasty road imperfections, such as potholes, courtesy of good suspension and 180mm ride-height. There's little to no wallow in corners and negligible body roll, with sufficient grip provided you don't push it too hard.

The engine doesn't feature drive modes but curiously the steering does, an option relatively absent in its segment. Drivers can switch to Comfort mode to keep steering light and breezy, while Sport provides some heft to the steering wheel though, sadly, there's no real feedback.

Where's the auto?

For Mahindra to truly assert its XUV300 as a true player in the market it needs to launch an auto variant. No, not a clunky CVT, or heaven forbid an AMT, but a proper auto transmission into the local segment. Mahindra confirms an auto is in the works but has yet to release details.

The new SUV isn't without its faults – steering feedback is lacklustre, there's currently no auto, and the boot could've been bigger given the vehicle's size.

In its primary respects, however (performance, space and drivability), Mahindra's engineers have done an excellent job.

A quick word on design: The XUV300 is not bad on the eye and, in terms of design, has a lot going for it. Mahindra has learned from its previous offerings and delivered a product that sports contemporary styling throughout, especially the interior.

Inside, the fit and finishes are very good, with a few quality elements, particularly the dashboard, centre console, and its overall smartphone/smartwatch connectivity. It's on par with others in the compact SUV market.

Rivals

Mahindra has set to sights on Ford's EcoSport, a major rival for the XUV300 in its home market and a major contender in South Africa.

The XUV300 will have to contend with many Asian rivals locally as well as a few European SUVs:

Hyundai Creta

Ford EcoSport

Suzuki Vitara

Opel GrandLand X

Overall

The XUV500 is agile, delivers adequate performance and is quite practical for its size. If nothing else, it's a good SUV that serves as a benchmark for future products from the Indian automaker. What remains to be seen is how it will fare against a host for well-established players in the mid-size SUV segment.

The XUV300 has the potential to be a bestseller.

What remains now is for Mahindra to deliver on pricing; if priced closer (or more affordable) than the EcoSport, its performance and features should make it a triumph for the automaker.

Ultimately, Mahindra has developed a good product and, like its marketing slogan, is on the rise in every automotive sense.

https://www.wheels24.co.za/OffRoad_and_4x4/Bakkie_and_SUV/headed-for-sa-heres-why-youll-be-pleasantly-surprised-by-mahindras-xuv300-20190207

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FiestaST

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DRIVEN: Mahindra XUV300 1,5 W8 manual

Generally speaking, the South African car-buyer is one picky creature. And that means smaller, lesser-known brands often have to work twice as hard to convince said consumers to sign on the dotted line. One such automaker is Mahindra, which has slowly but surely been building its reputation in South Africa, having arrived as long ago as 2004. Indeed, the local arm of the Indian manufacturer registered record sales in 2018, with passenger vehicles such as the XUV500 and KUV100 selling in fairly respectable numbers alongside the brand’s more established (and now locally assembled) Pik Up bakkie.

So, what’s next from the Mumbai-based brand? Well, it’s quite an important one, and you’re looking at it. This is the all-new XUV300, which borrows its X100 platform from the SsangYong Tivoli, and is on its way to South Africa to wade into the ruthless small crossover segment. And at first glance, you can tell exactly the sorts of rivals Mahindra hopes to target. Yes, the XUV300 offers some fairly bold styling, with the compact body boasting a few bulging panels plus short overhangs.

Step inside

That said, the newcomer’s beige interior is unlikely to find favour among South Africans. While potential buyers stepping into the cabin certainly won’t be blown away, once they start poking around they’ll appreciate the sort of kit they have access to. In W8 guise, for instance, the XUV300 is packed with standard features, including an infotainment system with smartphone mirroring and navigation, a pair of USB ports, dual-zone climate control (complete with saveable pre-sets), a sunroof, leather seats and more storage compartments than you’ll know what to do with.

And even though hard plastics abound (pressing down on certain areas of the facia can elicit the odd creak), the cabin offers an acceptable level of perceived quality. In the derivative we drove, safety and convenience are covered by as many as seven airbags, traction and stability control, ABS with EBD, keyless entry, hill-start assist, parking sensors (with a rear camera), automatic headlamps and stop-start technology. While final equipment levels of SA-spec models have yet to be revealed, Mahindra South Africa has assured us that much of this kit will make it to our market.

While the XUV300 offers generous head- and rear legroom, it’s by no means class-leading, with rivals such as the Ford EcoSport and Hyundai Creta boasting more generous dimensions. Tall drivers may feel just slightly cramped, but the driving position is suitably lofty, offering a decent view of the road ahead. The luggage compartment, meanwhile, has an adjustable platform, allowing it to expand to your needs, but with that short rear overhang and a full-sized spare wheel taking up some space, it’s not exactly cavernous.

Under the bonnet

The new crossover will be offered with two engine options; an 82 kW 1,2-litre turbo-triple and a 1,5-litre four-cylinder turbodiesel. Both units are mated to a six-speed manual gearbox as an automatic option is not yet offered. I took the turbodiesel through the bustling streets of Goa and was left suitably impressed. Considering India’s infamously erratic driving culture (and the sheer number of vehicles on the road), a car designed for this sort of market needs to be quick on its feet. And that’s why the XUV300’s powertrain was one of the most essential pieces of the puzzle.

In short, Mahindra has largely hit the mark with this engine. Almost immediately, I noticed its refinement; despite being an oil-burner, the mill produced very little rattle at idle and remained fairly smooth on the move, too. With 300 N.m of torque, it offers sufficient grunt at lower engine speeds, which renders overtaking and highway merging fairly effortless. That said, thanks to short gear ratios, a limited rev range and a spot of turbolag, I found myself shifting more often than I’d have liked. Still, the XUV300’s clutch and gearbox proved easy to modulate, which makes it well suited to the cut and thrust of city driving.

With front MacPherson struts and rear twist beams with coil springs, the XUV300 offers 180 mm of ground clearance and an impressive ride quality that took everything the roads of India could throw at it (I suspect it’ll ride even better on local soil). And, despite being a tallish crossover, the newcomer manages to counteract body roll pretty effectively.

The chassis delivers a fun and surprisingly dynamic driving experience, further accentuated by a steering system fitted with a stiffness controller that offers normal, comfort and sport modes. The former two are ideal for in-city use and parking jobs, but the sweet spot is the latter as it adds weight and some feel to the tiller (even if overall feedback is limited). Interestingly, Mahindra has also added a “wheel direction indicator” on the central display.

How will it fare in SA?

Ultimately, the XUV300 has the potential to become the brand’s most competitive and sophisticated product locally, ticking plenty of boxes in a segment that just keeps growing. However, I still believe the option of an automatic transmission is important here, regardless of the fact the six-speed manual is a cinch to operate.

Pricing, of course, is going to be crucial. Mahindra South Africa has yet to reveal final figures, but it has promised the XUV300 will be very aggressively priced despite its generous specification levels (locally, the crossover will be offered in three trim levels, with the range-topper expected to receive the full complement of seven airbags and navigation).

So, if Mahindra’s latest product is able to undercut its main competitors while also offering more standard kit, I suspect many a picky buyer will be convinced to slip in behind the wheel of the XUV300 for a quick test drive. And they’ll likely be very pleasantly surprised.
Mahindra XUV300

Model:Mahindra XUV300 1,5 W8 manual
Price:TBA
Engine:1,5-litre, 4-cyl, turbodiesel
Power:85 kW
Torque:300 N.m
0-100 km/h:N/A
Top Speed:N/A
Fuel Consumption:6,7 L/100 km
CO2:N/A
Transmission:6-spd manual
Maintenance Plan:TBA

https://www.carmag.co.za/car-reviews/driven-mahindra-xuv300-15-w8-manual/
 
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