Do you think Eskom will improve under its new CEO?

Do you think Eskom will improve under its new CEO?

  • Yes

    Votes: 167 43.3%
  • No

    Votes: 219 56.7%

  • Total voters
    386

Magnum

Expert Member
Joined
Mar 12, 2013
Messages
4,469
No, He will try and fail. Not of his own fault.

My employer has the same issue that Eskom has. We just can't get ahead of the problems and we going through staff like no tomorrow.
 

Conack

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2005
Messages
1,776
Not until he can fire the 16000 staff which have been branded "untouchable" and also "unnecessary".
 

Cube3

Expert Member
Joined
Jun 3, 2008
Messages
1,254
Day 1 on the job, they probably pulled him into a meeting, showed him pictures of his wife and kids and said to do what they say or else.... and pretend we are making progress.
 

AtholDuke

New Member
Joined
Oct 20, 2015
Messages
6
We still have load shedding which appears to be unproductive for all citizens and worst of all it affects businesses. We have not seen any major changes, the ESKOM sepush itinerary is useless and cannot be used to our advantage. The Chairman has no rights to comply with what needs to be done, compared to SAA, we are fighting a losing battle.
 

smg22

Active Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2011
Messages
84
If he is given at least 5 years to run with less interference on his job either by the government or unions, I believe there's still hope.
 

krycor

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
16,557
I think yes, the ongoing load-shedding, regular releases, and discussions, seem positive. Whether the government will let him do his job, the same as SAA BRP is a different question.

It's only been a month but the focus on repairs and maintenance is a good start as well as discussion around the procurement contracts. He's doing exactly what he should be, analyze the issue macroscopically and look for the biggest wins in the shortest time: maintenance and procurement are it and well within his purview. Also, a better sell to hold corruption accountable vs layoffs but that reality will bite sooner or later.
All of this started before he joined, he merely continues these with some changes eg being more forthright wrt when it happens eg trying to to prevent it during rush hour.

He does join a monopoly that’s going through drastic cuts in its monopoly power which will be interesting.. keep in mind that, regardless of what the unions, government etc want.. keeping a bloated workforce is still “his” decision regardless of how his hands are tied behind the table. Sucks.. but that’s the reality he signed up for and something to think about as they, Eskom ask for further price hikes.

One outcome he can and should be judged on heavily is the splitting of Eskom into the three functional subsidiaries and holding company as this will be within his tenure (if it completes). How he spilts debt, assets etc.
 

thechamp

Honorary Master
Joined
Feb 26, 2011
Messages
30,614
Yes, he started well with his focus on maintenance and government seem to be giving him the support that they never afforded to his predecessors so chances are good that we will see some improvement, as an example load shedding for some time in order to fix things is not a new suggestion, Busi Mavuso suggested it a while ago and it was ignored by government.
 
Last edited:

Stuey74

Senior Member
Joined
Jun 4, 2014
Messages
518
If he can change 2 things - staff complement and continued non-payers then yes. It doesn't matter if you can magically fix everything, if your costs are higher then your income it will fail.
 

Oudekat

New Member
Joined
May 31, 2019
Messages
6
Do you think Eskom will improve under its new CEO Andre de Ruyter? Do you think he will be able to stop load-shedding by 2022 as planned?
You cannot expect a CEO to be responsible for loadshedding when years of maintenance have been ignored. I say give the man a chance to find his feet, look at structures and in particular put in an accelerated on going maintenance plan. It is obvious that the company has been run on a day-to-day basis in the past with no forward planning. He has me full support.
 

morphman001

Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2012
Messages
13
No way. He needs to have full control and do what needs to be done for the paying customer to keep the lights on, but when government and unions get involved there will always be problems. I understand that there will be people loosing their job but if there is eskom left there are no jobs. Don't understand why maintenance was never done cause there are over enough workers to do the job or is it that they have no clue and not qualified to do the job?
This is going to be a long and expensive task, and we the paying people are going to foot the bill..
 

Tallboy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 10, 2005
Messages
320
Not without the full co-operation of government and the unions. Since there's no sign of that materialising any time soon my answer is a firm "NO"
The CEO must be allowed to make tough decisions without government interference. The same goes for SAA and we already see the government interfering with the business practitioner's decisions.
 

Gaz{M}

Executive Member
Joined
Feb 9, 2005
Messages
6,264
Can he improve EAF and reduce/eliminate loadshedding? Yes, over time with more maintenance.

Can he improve the financial situation at Eskom? No.
 
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