Dutch Development Jobs

Lord Farquart

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Nov 27, 2012
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What would be considered a good salary there?
It all depends. How many in the family? Age of family members?

As said before, medical and school is free for under 18s. A family of 4 adults, 2 kids over 18, can survive on €4500 before tax. That includes medical, insurances, bond, food etc. Less members and underaged kids can make it even easier to survive.

Survive is a term I use loosely. Surviving for us is eating well, living comfortably and going out a couple of times a month. And we still have money over at the end of the month from €4500 gross.

It will change when the kids start uni. :(Then again, we are a one income family, for now.

Anything more and you will have a good life. I took a 40% cut in pay from SA, and quality of living is on par. It will only get better from here
 

Archer

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Jan 7, 2010
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I work with a bunch of Dutch people. They do not switch to English, or Afrikaans, for my benefit. I am the minority.
It seems like from my limited experience that in the south there are more companies willing to hire people with zero Dutch. At my job the language of choice is actually English even though it is 75% Dutch employees

What would be considered a good salary there?
Anything that qualifies you for the full benefit from the 30% ruling, which is basically the equivalent of the 4400 Lord Farquart mentioned if I'm doing my calcs correctly. And in my experience this will give a pretty good life for your average family of 4
 

vic777

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May 6, 2015
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It seems like from my limited experience that in the south there are more companies willing to hire people with zero Dutch. At my job the language of choice is actually English even though it is 75% Dutch employees
In the Randstad area, in North Holland, most IT companies use English as a business language
 

Cius

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Jan 20, 2009
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Just a note on language. My parents are in the Netherlands working now on a 2 year stint. My mom was born there and speaks some Dutch, my dad though is English but very fluent in Afrikaans. He struggles. He tried to learn Dutch and gave up as most Dutch can speak some English, that however went south as while the Dutch are extremely tolerant of tourists who can't speak Dutch (they are a generally friendly country) they expect anyone actually living in the country to learn their language, which makes sense. While Afrikaans helps a lot in reading Dutch the way they speak words is very different and especially when they talk fast it is hard to pick up. Expect to learn a new language with some help from your Afrikaans but not as much as you hoped.
 

Lord Farquart

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Nov 27, 2012
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I need to add a weird concept from the Dutch. The deal on buying a house went through yesterday, so I am now a property owner in the Netherlands.

You don’t have to be a citizen to own property here, you just have to have money. A lot of Dutchies do not, because they can not afford the “eigengeld” part when purchasing property. That is the bond registration costs, lawyers fees, property transfer fees etc, the same stuff we have in SA. On a bond of €300k, that is like €12000.

The weird part is that almost 90% of this eigengeld can be claimed back from the tax man at the end of the year. Even weirder, I am paying 1,79% interest on this bond. At the end of the year I can also claim the interest paid on the bond fir that year back from the taxman. And from them on, every year. That makes it 0% interest. Obviously you have to have the means first before you can claim back.

The bond itself can be broken up in parts. A bond have a max repayment period of 30 years. Minimum fixed interest rate period is 1 year, no full variable. Only after 1 year can it be variable. The longer the period you fix it for, the higher the rate.

They then also allow you to break your bond up in parts for fixed rates. Mine is broken up into 2 parts. Part 1 €150k for 10 years @ 1,79%, Part 2 €150k for 20 years at 2,49%. I am not sure how many parts you can have, but it almost seem limitless.

Not sure why this is done, but I think it is to stimulate the housing market with incentives.
 
Last edited:

cguy

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Jan 2, 2013
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I need to add a weird concept from the Dutch. The deal on buying a house went through yesterday, so I am now a property owner in the Netherlands.

You don’t have to be a citizen to own property here, you just have to have money. A lot of Dutchies do not, because they can not afford the “eigengeld” part when purchasing property. That is the bond registration costs, lawyers fees, property transfer fees etc, the same stuff we have in SA. On a bond of €300k, that is like €12000.

The weird part is that almost 90% of this eigengeld can be claimed back from the tax man at the end of the year. Even weirder, I am paying 1,79% interest on this bond. At the end of the year I can also claim the interest paid on the bond fir that year back from the taxman. And from them on, every year. That makes it 0% interest. Obviously you have to have the means first before you can claim back.

The bond itself can be broken up in parts. A bond have a max repayment period of 30 years. Minimum fixed interest rate period is 1 year, no full variable. Only after 1 year can it be variable. The longer the period you fix it for, the higher the rate.

They then also allow you to break your bond up in parts for fixed rates. Mine is broken up into 2 parts. Part 1 €150k for 10 years @ 1,79%, Part 2 €150k for 20 years at 2,49%. I am not sure how many parts you can have, but it almost seem limitless.

Not sure why this is done, but I think it is to stimulate the housing market with incentives.
I doubt that it’s 0% interest. Most likely, you deduct your interest from your taxable income, so you save whatever your marginal tax rate is on the interest. Your interest then becomes roughly 1.79% multiplied by (1-0.22) = 0.78*1.79 if you are paying 22% marginal tax.

Congrats on the house BTW. Whenever I’ve heard people complain about high prices overseas, I think, yeah - but it costs the same because of the low interest, and at the end I own an expensive asset.
 

Spacerat

Senior Member
Joined
Jul 29, 2015
Messages
952
I need to add a weird concept from the Dutch. The deal on buying a house went through yesterday, so I am now a property owner in the Netherlands.

You don’t have to be a citizen to own property here, you just have to have money. A lot of Dutchies do not, because they can not afford the “eigengeld” part when purchasing property. That is the bond registration costs, lawyers fees, property transfer fees etc, the same stuff we have in SA. On a bond of €300k, that is like €12000.

The weird part is that almost 90% of this eigengeld can be claimed back from the tax man at the end of the year. Even weirder, I am paying 1,79% interest on this bond. At the end of the year I can also claim the interest paid on the bond fir that year back from the taxman. And from them on, every year. That makes it 0% interest. Obviously you have to have the means first before you can claim back.

The bond itself can be broken up in parts. A bond have a max repayment period of 30 years. Minimum fixed interest rate period is 1 year, no full variable. Only after 1 year can it be variable. The longer the period you fix it for, the higher the rate.

They then also allow you to break your bond up in parts for fixed rates. Mine is broken up into 2 parts. Part 1 €150k for 10 years @ 1,79%, Part 2 €150k for 20 years at 2,49%. I am not sure how many parts you can have, but it almost seem limitless.

Not sure why this is done, but I think it is to stimulate the housing market with incentives.
Congrats... Keen to see what EUR300K buys?
 

vic777

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Joined
May 6, 2015
Messages
1,352
The weird part is that almost 90% of this eigengeld can be claimed back from the tax man at the end of the year. Even weirder, I am paying 1,79% interest on this bond. At the end of the year I can also claim the interest paid on the bond fir that year back from the taxman. And from them on, every year. That makes it 0% interest. Obviously you have to have the means first before you can claim back.
As the years go on, and you pay back more interest, you can claim back less and less each year. It also depends on whether you chose the annuity or linear bond model
 

krycor

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Joined
Aug 4, 2005
Messages
16,538
The corporate I work for has also haemorrhaged skilled technical staff over the last year, to Europe. First the devs went and now the majority of BI/data science team leads have either gone or are going shortly.
It's quite unsettling but that being said, we're probably not far behind them.
So I’m likely to be moving jobs in the next 1-3 months and then will see what to do next.. stopped applying for jobs in Netherlands for a bit now till after elections.

Adyen does way more than e-commerce, and Amazon already has offices here, largest in Den Haag. There is a lot of opportunities for skilled developers in all areas. Many jobs especially in the payments industry.
Yip, I’m noticing that I need to apply directly to companies more than via LinkedIn. I’d say about 40-50% of LinkedIn adverts are recruitment companies who go for the popular placements.

If I get placed in SA, I will need to stay put for a bit (damn u ethics) or something goes sideways. One problem I have though is that I want to study next year which locks me out for 2yrs but then with a mba life will be easier.
 

Sucki3

Active Member
Joined
Oct 17, 2007
Messages
44
Hey guys,

Not a dev, but Systems Admin looking to relocate to the Netherlands. Does any know of any agencies or recruiters that I can contact with finding a job and assisting with the whole process.

I have been quite active on LinkedIn, but no success yet.

Thanks
 

GreGorGy

BULLSFAN
Joined
Jan 18, 2005
Messages
14,801
So with this new expat tax, what are your intentions? To just ignore it or do you have to pay?

Also, would an imported hire be allowed to use the coffee shops?
 

Mosgi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 17, 2010
Messages
241
Not much compared to what I had, but it was time to scale down.

https://www.funda.nl/koop/verkocht/almelo/huis-40174978-parterre-18/
Wow, congrats.

This house is enormous by Dutch standards - you actually have a back yard!

Agreed with everything, experienced a small town close to Amsterdam for a while and it was just fantastic.

Have been thinking about quality if life for a while and one thing I keep coming back is a bucket of Tulips on the side of the road. There was a money box next to it with a price Eur 1. The thinking, you take a Tulip and pay the price, nobody is watching. A society with that level of trust in their fellow people is astonishing.

My experience on language was also remarkable. I didn't speak much Dutch, but was a keen scholar and indeed it is pretty damn hard. Basics were okay, and I was nailing the accent. Trouble came in with responses and I had no clue what people were saying and they would get confused since a second ago I sounded fluent. I found asking people to speak slower because I'm learning often brought up a very warm response.

More importantly was how people switched to English seamlessly on a dime the moment I was even close to looking like maybe there is a chance that I would join the conversation. A spectacular experience especially in comparison to SA as mentioned above, where often it feels like it can only be deliberate.
 
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