Dutch Development Jobs

schuits

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Anyway, do not thing that Dutch is easy, or that you will get by with no Dutch. You will never integrate into society if you don’t put the effort in. Ask yourself, do you want to be sidelined for the rest of your life outside official business.
My parents were dutch, and I learnt to speak dutch fluently.
For work I had to read and write in dutch, which took some getting used to. The rules with 'de' and 'het' I NEVER got right, so someone always had to review my documentation.

Even with my dutch heritage I never integrated fully. Our culture is just different. Like sarcasm for example, the dutch don't really get it. But I joined a scuba club and guitar lessons and that went fine cause I put in the effort to integrate.

I'd say if you get the chance, just do it!
 

ArtyLoop

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Dec 18, 2017
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My parents were dutch, and I learnt to speak dutch fluently.
For work I had to read and write in dutch, which took some getting used to. The rules with 'de' and 'het' I NEVER got right, so someone always had to review my documentation.

Even with my dutch heritage I never integrated fully. Our culture is just different. Like sarcasm for example, the dutch don't really get it. But I joined a scuba club and guitar lessons and that went fine cause I put in the effort to integrate.

I'd say if you get the chance, just do it!
I've worked for a bunch of them, two brothers. They were not born in SA, and came here in the early 2000s.
Nope!
Cultural differences are a problem. They tend to look down on me because I am English.
They have this notion that we are supposed to work like machines and just pull rabbits out of hats.
They don't like my humour, my attitude or my culture.
Hence I know I will never fit in there.
 

Lord Farquart

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Nov 27, 2012
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I've worked for a bunch of them, two brothers. They were not born in SA, and came here in the early 2000s.
Nope!
Cultural differences are a problem. They tend to look down on me because I am English.
They have this notion that we are supposed to work like machines and just pull rabbits out of hats.
They don't like my humour, my attitude or my culture.
Hence I know I will never fit in there.
Most European countries look down on the English. Some actually hate them. You can not blame them. The English have been, and still are, pompous Richards. Just take Brexit as an example.:ROFL:
 

ArtyLoop

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Most European countries look down on the English. Some actually hate them. You can not blame them. The English have been, and still are, pompous Richards. Just take Brexit as an example.:ROFL:
Thank you. I honestly don't get it, since history is history and it was well before my time.
But it explains a lot... all the Afrikaans guys had it easy at that company. Oh well.
 

reactor_sa

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Most European countries look down on the English. Some actually hate them. You can not blame them. The English have been, and still are, pompous Richards. Just take Brexit as an example.:ROFL:
Sometimes it works to say you are from South Africa, the attitude can be very different just by letting them know. I found this sometimes the case when in European countries that don't speak a lot of English. Uber drivers, waiters, etc
 

Lord Farquart

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Sometimes it works to say you are from South Africa, the attitude can be very different just by letting them know. I found this sometimes the case when in European countries that don't speak a lot of English. Uber drivers, waiters, etc
Or walk into a shop and speak Afrikaans. They will then switch to English out of own free will and be very polite. Walking in with your English signals Englishman or American. They then switch off very quickly.
 

krycor

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Most of the jobs i've seen are in high freq trading/block chain stuffs (like luno startups many in uk has this too,u need java + ci/cd + springboot + concurrency) and of cause e-com (ayden is a huge employer). There are others too like booking.com and some setting up like Amazon.

I'd move there if i got a job sorted. The language i'd say is not really a hindrance in business as they made a conscious effort ensure their technology and science sectors are english driven to attract best talent from way back in the 1990s if i remember correctly. There is a reason why they have the least farming subsidies and highest efficiencies compared to the rest of Europe. Main attraction i'd think is timezone and flights being cheap to comeback for holidays. If you already senior the move is generally favourable.. if non-tech u may struggle tho.
 

Archer

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Jan 7, 2010
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4. Schooling.
If you have kids, you pay €40/year for schools. fees Then they pay you €200/3months to keep them in school. Weird. The older the kids are, the more you receive back. Kids have to go to school on the day they turn 3. Before that, they go to kinderopvang(preschool) for a day or two a week. This is not free, as any other daycare. Before the age of 3, you pay an hourly rate.

7. Food is also all over the place. If you shop at the Woolies equivalent(Alber Hein), then have a big budget. If you shop at Aldi/Lidl/Dirk etc, you can half the cost. We checked our costs for March, and a family of 4 adults came in at €600. We are pretty sure we can do it for €400 or less.
Be prepared to eat a lot of chicken, pork and half-and-half mince. Those are the staples. Beef and lamb could be 5-10 times the price of chicken /kg.
We also pop over the border to Germany, and stock up on wine and meat there. Other things too, but the mear=t and wine is pretty cheap there. Chicken €1,60/kg and pork €2,50/kg. Locally those are double or more.
Some of my notes/corrections
Kids must go to school at the age of five, not three. It is however strongly encouraged. Up to the age of four you'll be paying for the kinderdagopvang and then they can start the normal school which is then "free" even though they are not five yet. And once they are five it's 100% compulsory, so no taking long weekends during the school year or stuff like that . The kinderdagopvang btw will be expensive unless both parents are working
Regarding food, we eat lots of meat and the grocery budget (so not just food) ends up at ±800 max (I've been tracking it since December). Two adults, two youngsters, two dogs. But yes, lots of chicken and pork with a splurge for ribs and sometimes steak in the weekends for a braai if the sun is shining :p
 

ArtyLoop

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They're trying to headhunt me because of my knowledge and experience with payment systems.
 

creeper

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Most European countries look down on the English. Some actually hate them. You can not blame them. The English have been, and still are, pompous Richards. Just take Brexit as an example.:ROFL:
This is what I experienced in my interview as well. Was asked what will happen to my kid. I stated that she will be brought up Dutch, because she will live in the Netherlands. They expected me to say English and after that, the interview environment changed (less ‘hostile’). DIdn’t get the job though, didn’t have enough experience in the area they are trying to fill (quite specialized).

The problem is, I had the taste of the Netherlands and I get why you stay there. Yes, culturally it is a big impact. Yes, houses might be smaller, yes, the weather is different, but damn, everything works, the govt looks after its citizens, child will get a good education ‘for free’ and you don’t have to look over your shoulder every 30 seconds.

And you are 2 hours from anywhere in Europe.
 

Lord Farquart

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This is what I experienced in my interview as well. Was asked what will happen to my kid. I stated that she will be brought up Dutch, because she will live in the Netherlands. They expected me to say English and after that, the interview environment changed (less ‘hostile’). DIdn’t get the job though, didn’t have enough experience in the area they are trying to fill (quite specialized).

The problem is, I had the taste of the Netherlands and I get why you stay there. Yes, culturally it is a big impact. Yes, houses might be smaller, yes, the weather is different, but damn, everything works, the govt looks after its citizens, child will get a good education ‘for free’ and you don’t have to look over your shoulder every 30 seconds.

And you are 2 hours from anywhere in Europe.
You phone the town council for an appointment for something. They answer the phone on the first ring. You get an appointment for 14:55-15:00. You get called at 14:55. The printer jams, and they start panicking because the 15:00 appointment might be delayed.
 

Archer

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You phone the town council for an appointment for something. They answer the phone on the first ring. You get an appointment for 14:55-15:00. You get called at 14:55. The printer jams, and they start panicking because the 15:00 appointment might be delayed.
On the flip side if you arrive early and they aren't busy you have to wait because otherwise the order of the universe would be disturbed :ROFL:
 

Lord Farquart

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On the flip side if you arrive early and they aren't busy you have to wait because otherwise the order of the universe would be disturbed :ROFL:
But why arrive early if you know when you will be helped? Public transport etc will be on time. :D
 

chickenbeef

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Sep 10, 2008
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At the company I work for we've been losing atleast 1 dev every month since November last year because they emigrating to Netherlands.
 
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