Dutch Development Jobs

Lord Farquart

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Not necessary. Expat tax is for those that fail the tax residency test. The only reason this expat tax thing is doing the rounds (again) is because so many people are leaving SA and the companies that do financial emigration saw a gap in the market to exploit. Unless you need to get your Retirement Annuity funds out of the country there is no need to financially emigrate, just make sure you file a 0 return for SARS each year and make sure you stay and earn in the country abroad and there is nothing they can do.

The tax targets those that go abroad periodically and work in different countries or for people that stay in SA but are employed abroad (hence taxing salary abroad where money is earned as well as locally in SA).
^^^^ This
Fearmongering
 

cguy

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Not necessarily restricted to Dutch relocation but do you guys think having a Master's under your belt will make job hunting overseas easier?
Definitely. At all the companies I have worked (actually, in SA as well), the most common qualification for developers has been an MSc or MEng, and for one job, even PhD. The post-grad qualifications help to set you apart from other applicants - this is most important when the job is sufficiently desirable, that there are too many applicants to interview and/or phone-screen, and one has to sort them into a priority list. For a quantitative role (data scientist, quantitative researcher, quantitative developer, etc.), PhDs are the most helpful, but sometimes people get by with masters degrees.

Also, for countries that have to prove that they couldn't find someone local to do the job, the more restrictive qualification requirement weeds out the noise. In some cases, it also puts candidate in a different visa class, allowing them to get work visas or permanent residency more easily (e.g., USA).
 

prOd

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Definitely. At all the companies I have worked (actually, in SA as well), the most common qualification for developers has been an MSc or MEng, and for one job, even PhD. The post-grad qualifications help to set you apart from other applicants - this is most important when the job is sufficiently desirable, that there are too many applicants to interview and/or phone-screen, and one has to sort them into a priority list. For a quantitative role (data scientist, quantitative researcher, quantitative developer, etc.), PhDs are the most helpful, but sometimes people get by with masters degrees.

Also, for countries that have to prove that they couldn't find someone local to do the job, the more restrictive qualification requirement weeds out the noise. In some cases, it also puts candidate in a different visa class, allowing them to get work visas or permanent residency more easily (e.g., USA).
Good stuff, thanks.
 

cguy

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Good stuff, thanks.
Sure. I should have added that in many other countries, Masters degrees are a little more straightforward to get. Sometimes they can be only a year (UK or NZ, IIRC), and usually they are done by coursework (USA). The SA MSc is usually a research degree - which has the same weight as a qualification, but can be harder to get due to the open-endedness of a research degree. I would say that it's important to make sure that you're the type of person who can get through the degree in a reasonable amount of time (18-months to 2-years). Although a great qualification to have, doing it for 5 years, takes away a lot of the value.
 
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prOd

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Sure. I should have added that in many other countries, Masters degrees are a little more straightforward to get. Sometimes they can be only a year (UK or NZ, IIRC), and usually they are done by coursework (USA). The SA MSc is usually a research degree - which has the same weight as a qualification, but can be harder to get due to the open-endedness of a research degree. I would say that it's import to make sure that you're the type of person who can get through the degree in a reasonable amount of time (18-months to 2-years). Although a great qualification to have, doing it for 5 years, takes away a lot of the value.
I'm definitely aiming for minimum 2 years since I'd have to do it part-time, but no more than that! First step is to apply though :p
 

aquadat0r

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Just landed a skilled migrant job offer from the Netherlands with 30% dispensation, paying EUR 120 000 per annum. Trying to figure out what this would mean for a family of 4 in terms of living standards and costs. Any advice would be appreciated. Relocation will be handled by the company in full, but will probably need to put my 2 kids in English international school.
 
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cguy

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Just landed a skilled migrant job offer from the Netherlands with 30% dispensation, paying EUR 120 000 per annum. Trying to figure out what this would mean for a family of 4 in terms of living standards and costs. Any advice would be appreciated. Relocation will be handled by the company in full, but will probably need to put my 2 kids in English international school.
Amsterdam?
 

vic777

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Just landed a skilled migrant job offer from the Netherlands with 30% dispensation, paying EUR 120 000 per annum. Trying to figure out what this would mean for a family of 4 in terms of living standards and costs. Any advice would be appreciated. Relocation will be handled by the company in full, but will probably need to put my 2 kids in English international school.
Which company, permanent contract, contract for definite time, or contracting position? Where are they based?

Also, remember, the company doesn't grant the 30% rule, they support you and Belastingdienst grants it
 

creeper

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Just landed a skilled migrant job offer from the Netherlands with 30% dispensation, paying EUR 120 000 per annum. Trying to figure out what this would mean for a family of 4 in terms of living standards and costs. Any advice would be appreciated. Relocation will be handled by the company in full, but will probably need to put my 2 kids in English international school.
That is damn good salary. What role/ position?
 

stixx

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Just landed a skilled migrant job offer from the Netherlands with 30% dispensation, paying EUR 120 000 per annum. Trying to figure out what this would mean for a family of 4 in terms of living standards and costs. Any advice would be appreciated. Relocation will be handled by the company in full, but will probably need to put my 2 kids in English international school.
Damn dude, what do you do to earn that salary? I am guessing senior management?
 

aquadat0r

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Which company, permanent contract, contract for definite time, or contracting position? Where are they based?

Also, remember, the company doesn't grant the 30% rule, they support you and Belastingdienst grants it
Permanent position close to The Hague (Den Haag).

Yes, they will support to application but should not be an issue according to them.
 

cguy

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Permanent position close to The Hague (Den Haag).

Yes, they will support to application but should not be an issue according to them.
The Hague has a lower CoL than Amsterdam, and that’s a great salary regardless, and you have the 30%. I expect that you will be very comfortable.

One piece of advice is to rent something initially, ideally small and furnished, so you can move easily once you find the exact area you want to live in.
 

vic777

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Permanent position close to The Hague (Den Haag).

Yes, they will support to application but should not be an issue according to them.
Permanent positions are hard to come by. Usually you get appointed with a fixed duration contract (either 6 months, 1 year or some variation). After two iterations of these, you have to get appointed permanently.

If your paperwork is in order, the 30% rule should go smoothly, just remember, it was reduced in duration twice now, from 10 to 8, then to 5 years. There are talks it will be abolished in the future

Den Haag is a wonderful city. Cost of living wise, most people that work in Amsterdam will live further away in the "Randstad" area and many options exist for commuting, its the same with Den Haag

Salary wise, its excellent, way above the national average. You'll have no problem living on this single income as a family of four

International schools are very expensive. You might be looking at something like €3000 - €5000 per annum per child. State schools are really, really good and free.

How old are your kids?
 

stixx

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It’s a head of product strategy role for a multinational. Having a doctorate in Comp Sci and a MBA helps a lot.
Nice man! I recently moved to the Netherlands and and living and working in Den Haag.
 

creeper

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It sure does! ;)
Quick question. How did you go about getting the job? Direct application or via a job agency?

I have the advantage of having a Dutch passport, but not keen to just arrive there and find a job.
 

cguy

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Quick question. How did you go about getting the job? Direct application or via a job agency?

I have the advantage of having a Dutch passport, but not keen to just arrive there and find a job.
My job offer was for the US. The company approached me. One advantage of doing a PhD is that you get a fair amount of international exposure if you publish internationally, collaborate with foreign researchers/universities, etc. (I did all of the above). I have been approached with work from many countries over the years.

My current company has offices in Amsterdam, so technically I could move there if I wished. Perhaps one day - Amsterdam is fantastic.

Back then, I had a university web page, but today I would work on my LinkedIn profile more than anything else. I would also apply directly to companies and mention your Dutch citizenship as early as possible on your Resume.
 

aquadat0r

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Permanent positions are hard to come by. Usually you get appointed with a fixed duration contract (either 6 months, 1 year or some variation). After two iterations of these, you have to get appointed permanently.

If your paperwork is in order, the 30% rule should go smoothly, just remember, it was reduced in duration twice now, from 10 to 8, then to 5 years. There are talks it will be abolished in the future

Den Haag is a wonderful city. Cost of living wise, most people that work in Amsterdam will live further away in the "Randstad" area and many options exist for commuting, its the same with Den Haag

Salary wise, its excellent, way above the national average. You'll have no problem living on this single income as a family of four

International schools are very expensive. You might be looking at something like €3000 - €5000 per annum per child. State schools are really, really good and free.

How old are your kids?
14 and 12, so going dutch will be tough
 
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