Dutch Development Jobs

vic777

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Are the state school dual-medium or Dutch only?
State schools are Dutch. They do other languages later on like German en French as additional subjects.

You do get schools called "TPO" schools (Tweetalig primair onderwijs) where English is included as well. You usually then have a voluntary contribution of roughly €500 per annum

My son was 4 when I came over, he was speaking dutch within 4 months.

As a country, its extremely friendly to expats in that most people, especially in the Randstad, can and will speak English.
 

creeper

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State schools are Dutch. They do other languages later on like German en French as additional subjects.

You do get schools called "TPO" schools (Tweetalig primair onderwijs) where English is included as well. You usually then have a voluntary contribution of roughly €500 per annum

My son was 4 when I came over, he was speaking dutch within 4 months.

As a country, its extremely friendly to expats in that most people, especially in the Randstad, can and will speak English.
All my research points to exactly that. The Dutch are open to expats. One of my family members are leaving soon, and the company is basically paying for all his relocation costs.
 

martin

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State schools are Dutch. They do other languages later on like German en French as additional subjects.

You do get schools called "TPO" schools (Tweetalig primair onderwijs) where English is included as well. You usually then have a voluntary contribution of roughly €500 per annum

My son was 4 when I came over, he was speaking dutch within 4 months.

As a country, its extremely friendly to expats in that most people, especially in the Randstad, can and will speak English.
Thanks for the detailed response! My kids are 7 and 5 and bilingual with a good command of both English and Afrikaans. Based on what I've read I should not assume that there's a silky smooth transition from Afrikaans to Dutch. I guess they're still young enough to pick it up fairly quickly though.

At this point, I've not made up my mind on whether to actively pursue a move to the Netherlands. I'm a Developer with a lot of formal experience (15+ years) but no degree (I do have a Diploma and I've been studying part-time for the past year). Most of the job offerings I've come across so far seem to require a degree so I'm not sure what my chances are. If anyone in a similar position has had success in this regard I'd really appreciate your advice.
 

creeper

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Thanks for the detailed response! My kids are 7 and 5 and bilingual with a good command of both English and Afrikaans. Based on what I've read I should not assume that there's a silky smooth transition from Afrikaans to Dutch. I guess they're still young enough to pick it up fairly quickly though.

At this point, I've not made up my mind on whether to actively pursue a move to the Netherlands. I'm a Developer with a lot of formal experience (15+ years) but no degree (I do have a Diploma and I've been studying part-time for the past year). Most of the job offerings I've come across so far seem to require a degree so I'm not sure what my chances are. If anyone in a similar position has had success in this regard I'd really appreciate your advice.
Watch out. Afrikaans and Dutch share a lot, but it is a more complex language. You can understand it with Afrikaans, but speaking and writing it is a different ballgame.

Regarding kids. The younger, the better. Studies show that children are able to learn new languages easier to about 10 years of age.

Some other things:

Get your CV in the Europe style.
Do a lot of research. Lots of sites.
Visit the place first.
Make sure the whole family is onboard.

I have a rough word doc with essential info Pm me and I will email it.
 

vic777

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Thanks for the detailed response! My kids are 7 and 5 and bilingual with a good command of both English and Afrikaans. Based on what I've read I should not assume that there's a silky smooth transition from Afrikaans to Dutch. I guess they're still young enough to pick it up fairly quickly though.
They will. Afrikaans helps in that you can understand it when people speak to you and you can read Dutch. The grammar is very different, in some ways I wish I could forget Afrikaans, because it does get in the way when you start learning grammar.

They should be more than fine. My son is happier at school here than he ever was in South Africa. His teacher is really fantastic, the school is fantastic, and the best part is, its a state school.

Dutch kids tend to be happy, well-adjusted kids - I see kids of 5 years old riding their bicycles in our street.

At this point, I've not made up my mind on whether to actively pursue a move to the Netherlands. I'm a Developer with a lot of formal experience (15+ years) but no degree (I do have a Diploma and I've been studying part-time for the past year). Most of the job offerings I've come across so far seem to require a degree so I'm not sure what my chances are. If anyone in a similar position has had success in this regard I'd really appreciate your advice.
I'm in a different situation compared to you (I have two degrees), but having worked here a while I give you my view. Most people I work with have degrees, most people have Masters degrees - but, my company will not disqualify any candidate with no degree who can do the job well and demonstrate that. Most of the developers here (I'd estimate 90%) are expats. If you don't have an EU passport, it makes it harder - but if you have sought after skills you can try approaching an employer who is able to sponsor a highly skilled migrant visa. We have people working with us without degrees - depending on the job, it might be a problem, or it might not.

The job postings will say they require a degree, most people who apply will have a degree but don't let that stop you.

The best advice I can give you is to have an updated LinkedIn profile (I found all the positions I applied for via LinkedIn), have a Dutch format CV (Google it, they don't like the 15 page essays we consider CV's in SA) and make sure your skills are up to date. A few personal projects on Github won't hurt. Whether you have a degree or not, you'll face the same long interview process - if you pass that, it won't matter whether you have a degree or just a diploma.

Most companies do an initial Skype screen, then a technical test (either a mini project, or a few hours worth of Codility/HackerRank challenges), sometimes psychometric tests, face to face interviews and then an offer. Some companies, like Amazon, will have a whole day of back to back interviews with a short lunch break inbetween.

Make sure your paperwork is in order: unabridged, apostilled marriage certificates, unabridged, apostilled birth certificates for the whole family, recent passport, police clearance (some companies require this, I had to provide one)
 

vic777

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Watch out. Afrikaans and Dutch share a lot, but it is a more complex language. You can understand it with Afrikaans, but speaking and writing it is a different ballgame.
I can't agree more. Dutch grammar is much, much more complex than Afrikaans and way different
 

Solarion

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How difficult is it to get over there? Flip I wouldn't mind a relocate tbh.
 

Solitude

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So, I went to the Netherlands as part of a Europe trip. And this thread was on my mind the whole time. The people there are so friendly and I really like the country. Well, the bits I saw in any case. I was too scared to emigrate but now that I've actually seen what it's like over there, I'm a lot more keen.

Will be doing some research.
 
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creeper

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So, I went to the Netherlands as part of a Europe trip. And this thread was on my mind the whole time. The people there are so friendly and I really like the country. Well, the bits I saw in any case. I was too scared to emigrate but now that I've actually seen what it's like over there, I'm a lot more keen.

Will be doing some research.
Happened to my brother as well. He went there for a visit and now he is leaving to the Netherlands
 
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