Immigrating to Ireland

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,752
400 a month n heating is what our friends are paying. Oil + electric heating. Rural homes generally have poor insulation.
Jesus, I live slightly rural in the UK and don’t even pay that for the winter quarter (I pay my electricity and gas quarterly). Maybe you should be looking for a house that’s on the gas main rather than oil.
 

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
7,369
Irish immigration laws are very similar to the rest of Europe. You will be using the country's domestic immigration laws that differ from the set EU regulations. You will NOT be issued with a Permanent Residence Card until you complete your 5 to 7 year stay depending on the country . You will also not have freedom of movement until you get citizenship of that country. Your residency permit is only valid within that country.

Finding a job without the knowledge of the language is nearly impossible and you need to find the job before you come here.
That's insane. 10-13 years for citizenship. You can be a citizen of Australia in 4 years.
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,752
That's insane. 10-13 years for citizenship. You can be a citizen of Australia in 4 years.
It’s 5 years for Ireland.

Application based on residence for non-EU/EEA & non-Swiss nationals

To apply for citizenship by naturalisation based on residence, you must prove that you:
  1. Have been - and are now - legally resident in the State, and
  2. Have built up enough 'reckonable residence' in the State
A: Legal residence
You must prove that you have been legally resident in the State for at least 5 years out of the last 9 years. This includes 1 year of continuous residence immediately before the date you apply.
http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/inis/pages/wp16000022
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,752
Last edited:

FiestaST

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 9, 2009
Messages
54,610
Unfortunately I can’t add any value here but I have a question about point 8).

If cars are so unaffordable due to insurance who buys cars then? I know they actually have a motor industry ito new models, vehicles sales, support etc.
 

Spizz

Goat Botherer
Joined
Jan 19, 2009
Messages
23,682
Unfortunately I can’t add any value here but I have a question about point 8).

If cars are so unaffordable due to insurance who buys cars then? I know they actually have a motor industry ito new models, vehicles sales, support etc.
It’s not only insurance. You also need regular roadworthy tests by law which are very stringent on their requirements and can end up costing a lot of money in replacement parts. In Ireland it’s every 2 years, in the UK it’s every year.

These often lead to cars needing more work done than they are worth, especially at about the 8 to 10 year mark.
 

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
7,369
No, it’s 5 years of residency and then apply for citizenship. Read the link.

As soon as you arrive on a long term visa you register as a resident, Marco supplies confusing info at times...

http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/irish-residence-permit

http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/INIS/Pages/about-registration-system
No matter. You still cannot arrive a resident - which will always make things more difficult, as there is no guarantee that you haven't packed up your entire life only to be sent home after your work permit expires. You're reliant on your employer not to screw you. Terrifying.
 

marco

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
2,790
That's insane. 10-13 years for citizenship. You can be a citizen of Australia in 4 years.
I did not mention 10 - 13 years but 5 to 7 years. Most EU countries will give you permanent residency after a continuous stay of 5 years. Germany requires 7 or 8 years and Ireland has a complicated system. Only after holding permanent residency for 1 year can you apply for citizenship. This does not conflict with anything I have said as one poster said I do.
All EU member countries are obligated to use EU immigration regulations but citizenship is not controlled by Brussels but by the country's domestic law.
 
Last edited:

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
7,369
I did not mention 10 - 13 years but 5 to 7 years. Most EU countries will give you permanent residency after a continuous stay of 5 years. Germany requires 7 or 8 years and Ireland has a complicated system. Only after holding permanent residency for 1 year can you apply for citizenship. This does not conflict with anything I have said as one poster said I do.
All EU member countries are obligated to use EU immigration regulations but citizenship is not controlled by Brussels but by the country's domestic law.
Yeah, you and @Dave are still not on the same page.
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,752
No matter. You still cannot arrive a resident - which will always make things more difficult, as there is no guarantee that you haven't packed up your entire life only to be sent home after your work permit expires. You're reliant on your employer not to screw you. Terrifying.
You are obliged to register as a resident when you arrive with the intention of staying more than 90 days.
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,752
No matter. You still cannot arrive a resident -
You didn’t read the links, did you?

Who needs an Irish Residence Permit (IRP)

If you are a non-EU/EEA and non-Swiss citizen and you wish to stay in Ireland for any reason for longer than 90 days, you must apply for immigration permission and (if successful) then register.
You need to register as a resident as soon as you arrive if you intend to stay longer than 90 days. It’s not hard to read those links, they’re written in plain English ;).
 

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
7,369
You are obliged to register as a resident when you arrive with the intention of staying more than 90 days.
This does not appear to be the same thing as indefinite permanent residence. Failure to remain employed is enough reason to deport.
 

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
7,369
You didn’t read the links, did you?



You need to register as a resident as soon as you arrive if you intend to stay longer than 90 days. It’s not hard to read those links, they’re written in plain English ;).
Once again @Dave, this is not the same thing as permanent residency. Your permission to remain is not indefinitely guaranteed.
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,752
This does not appear to be the same thing as indefinite permanent residence. Failure to remain employed is enough reason to deport.
Once again @Dave, this is not the same thing as permanent residency. Your permission to remain is not indefinitely guaranteed.
You’re conflating two issues now (no one mentioned permanent residency), the point is that after 5 years of residency you can apply for citizenship.

To apply for citizenship by naturalisation based on residence, you must prove that you:
  1. Have been - and are now - legally resident in the State, and
  2. Have built up enough 'reckonable residence' in the State
You must prove that you have been legally resident in the State for at least 5 years out of the last 9 years. This includes 1 year of continuous residence immediately before the date you apply.
http://www.inis.gov.ie/en/inis/pages/wp16000022
 
Last edited:
Top