Immigrating to Ireland

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
6,845
#61
You’re conflating two issues now (no one mentioned permanent residency), the point is that after 5 years of residency you can apply for citizenship.
Generally, you can apply for residency after legally living in Ireland for 5 years. This includes General Employment Permit holders. However, as a nice advantage for techies, Critical Skills Employment Permit holders can apply for residency after just 2 years. Once you’ve been granted residency, you won’t need any further employment permits.

This is why you and @marco are on different pages. No one is differentiating here between residence permission and permanent residency. And you're both using the terms interchangeably for "residency".
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,421
#62
Generally, you can apply for residency after legally living in Ireland for 5 years.
Completely wrong, try and read the links, you’re a resident when you arrive with the intention of (legally) remaining more than 90 days.

5 years after you’ve become a legal resident (and have remained in Eire for the majority of those 5 years, including the entire year preceding the application) you can apply for citizenship.
 

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
6,845
#63
Completely wrong, try and read the links, you’re a resident when you arrive with the intention of (legally) remaining more than 90 days.

5 years after you’ve become a legal resident (and have remained in Eire for the majority of those 5 years, including the entire year preceding the application) you can apply for citizenship.
And during these 5 years do you require an employment permit?
 

garp

Executive Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2004
Messages
6,877
#64
Yes but you will be subjected to the same kind of scrutiny as if applying for a visa on other countries and will have to satisfy Immigration that you intend to return. Proof would include return tickets, bank statements, proof of employment and other commitments back home etc etc etc
Nah, it's seldom anything as draconian as that. Most of the time they just stamp your RSA passport with no questions. The most they might ask for is proof of your return flight and maybe accommodation details.
 

marco

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
2,763
#65
And surprisingly I’m the only one providing links to Irish .gov pages to back up what I’m saying...
I have never implied that I know the Irish rules for citizenship. I did say it was more complicated than other countries but I have never researched it as I have with other EU countries. EU immigration regulations are standard throughout the EU countries but domestic law is a very different story when third country nationals are involved.
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,421
#67
EU immigration regulations are standard throughout the EU countries but domestic law is a very different story when third country nationals are involved.
I would agree with you, but go further and say EU regs don't play any part when the immigrant is not an EU/EEA citizen (or connected to one).
 

marco

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
2,763
#69
International household movers vs international send-my-bags.

I sold all my large furniture and appliances and was left with 2 x 30 kg suitcases apart from my cabin and check in luggage. This was from Porto Portugal to the UK.

The quotes I got from international movers was about € 280.00 for the 2 suitcases.

SendMyBags.com quoted me € 47.00 per suitcase and they collected them from my home and delivered them to my address in the UK 3 days later.
I would suggest you fit as much as you can into large suitcases not exceeding 30 kg and have them collect and deliver. It is amazing how much personal and household stuff you can shove into them. You must wrap them in cling foil for that bit of extra security.
Just a tip.
 

marco

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2006
Messages
2,763
#70
I would agree with you, but go further and say EU regs don't play any part when the immigrant is not an EU/EEA citizen (or connected to one).
Perhaps my English is not up to standard but I agree and never meant otherwise.
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,421
#71
So it's really just a work visa and you can be sent packing at any time (for most people)?
Which is irrelevant, if you manage to hold onto your job for 5 years you can then apply for citizenship, it isn't written in Swahili or Algebraic code...
 
Joined
Aug 25, 2008
Messages
15,201
#72
Lady on facebook group ( sa moving to Ireland), bought 300 euro car, insurance 2100 euro a year lol

Best tip is buy the newest smallest engine size car you can afford, don't buy anything older than 10 years old. Stick with 1L engine car.

Once you build insurance profile you can buy some nicer.
 

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
6,845
#73
Which is irrelevant, if you manage to hold onto your job for 5 years you can then apply for citizenship, it isn't written in Swahili or Algebraic code...
It's quite relevant for those who can't hold onto their job - be he a Kenyan maths teacher, or not.

Quite frankly this is a s**t position to be in, that you're beholden to your employer for fear of being deported. Right now those "residents" of Ireland are second class temporary migrants.

Thank you, but no thank you. I'd prefer a country where, once you're a resident, you're welcome to remain regardless of the situation you find yourself in.
 

Dave

Honorary Master
Joined
Aug 31, 2008
Messages
47,421
#74
Quite frankly this is a s**t position to be in, that you're beholden to your employer for fear of being deported. Right now those "residents" of Ireland are second class temporary migrants.

Thank you, but no thank you. I'd prefer a country where, once you're a resident, you're welcome to remain regardless of the situation you find yourself in.
Pretty much how it is in most countries if your residence there relies on a work permit/visa, iirc Eire is one of the more relaxed giving you 6 months to find a new job if you lose your current one.
 
Last edited:

phaktza

Executive Member
Joined
Jun 29, 2008
Messages
6,845
#75
Pretty much how it is in most countries if your residence there relies on a work permit/visa, iirc Eire is one of the more relaxed giving you 6 months to find a new job if you lose your current one.
Yeah, think I dodged a bullet there ;-)
 
Top