Immigrating to Ireland

phaktza

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You’re conflating two issues now (no one mentioned permanent residency), the point is that after 5 years of residency you can apply for citizenship.
Generally, you can apply for residency after legally living in Ireland for 5 years. This includes General Employment Permit holders. However, as a nice advantage for techies, Critical Skills Employment Permit holders can apply for residency after just 2 years. Once you’ve been granted residency, you won’t need any further employment permits.

This is why you and @marco are on different pages. No one is differentiating here between residence permission and permanent residency. And you're both using the terms interchangeably for "residency".
 

Dave

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Generally, you can apply for residency after legally living in Ireland for 5 years.
Completely wrong, try and read the links, you’re a resident when you arrive with the intention of (legally) remaining more than 90 days.

5 years after you’ve become a legal resident (and have remained in Eire for the majority of those 5 years, including the entire year preceding the application) you can apply for citizenship.
 

phaktza

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Completely wrong, try and read the links, you’re a resident when you arrive with the intention of (legally) remaining more than 90 days.

5 years after you’ve become a legal resident (and have remained in Eire for the majority of those 5 years, including the entire year preceding the application) you can apply for citizenship.
And during these 5 years do you require an employment permit?
 

garp

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Yes but you will be subjected to the same kind of scrutiny as if applying for a visa on other countries and will have to satisfy Immigration that you intend to return. Proof would include return tickets, bank statements, proof of employment and other commitments back home etc etc etc
Nah, it's seldom anything as draconian as that. Most of the time they just stamp your RSA passport with no questions. The most they might ask for is proof of your return flight and maybe accommodation details.
 

marco

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And surprisingly I’m the only one providing links to Irish .gov pages to back up what I’m saying...
I have never implied that I know the Irish rules for citizenship. I did say it was more complicated than other countries but I have never researched it as I have with other EU countries. EU immigration regulations are standard throughout the EU countries but domestic law is a very different story when third country nationals are involved.
 

Dave

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EU immigration regulations are standard throughout the EU countries but domestic law is a very different story when third country nationals are involved.
I would agree with you, but go further and say EU regs don't play any part when the immigrant is not an EU/EEA citizen (or connected to one).
 

marco

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International household movers vs international send-my-bags.

I sold all my large furniture and appliances and was left with 2 x 30 kg suitcases apart from my cabin and check in luggage. This was from Porto Portugal to the UK.

The quotes I got from international movers was about € 280.00 for the 2 suitcases.

SendMyBags.com quoted me € 47.00 per suitcase and they collected them from my home and delivered them to my address in the UK 3 days later.
I would suggest you fit as much as you can into large suitcases not exceeding 30 kg and have them collect and deliver. It is amazing how much personal and household stuff you can shove into them. You must wrap them in cling foil for that bit of extra security.
Just a tip.
 

marco

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I would agree with you, but go further and say EU regs don't play any part when the immigrant is not an EU/EEA citizen (or connected to one).
Perhaps my English is not up to standard but I agree and never meant otherwise.
 

Dave

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So it's really just a work visa and you can be sent packing at any time (for most people)?
Which is irrelevant, if you manage to hold onto your job for 5 years you can then apply for citizenship, it isn't written in Swahili or Algebraic code...
 

Gtx Gaming

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Lady on facebook group ( sa moving to Ireland), bought 300 euro car, insurance 2100 euro a year lol

Best tip is buy the newest smallest engine size car you can afford, don't buy anything older than 10 years old. Stick with 1L engine car.

Once you build insurance profile you can buy some nicer.
 

phaktza

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Which is irrelevant, if you manage to hold onto your job for 5 years you can then apply for citizenship, it isn't written in Swahili or Algebraic code...
It's quite relevant for those who can't hold onto their job - be he a Kenyan maths teacher, or not.

Quite frankly this is a s**t position to be in, that you're beholden to your employer for fear of being deported. Right now those "residents" of Ireland are second class temporary migrants.

Thank you, but no thank you. I'd prefer a country where, once you're a resident, you're welcome to remain regardless of the situation you find yourself in.
 

Dave

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Quite frankly this is a s**t position to be in, that you're beholden to your employer for fear of being deported. Right now those "residents" of Ireland are second class temporary migrants.

Thank you, but no thank you. I'd prefer a country where, once you're a resident, you're welcome to remain regardless of the situation you find yourself in.
Pretty much how it is in most countries if your residence there relies on a work permit/visa, iirc Eire is one of the more relaxed giving you 6 months to find a new job if you lose your current one.
 
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phaktza

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Pretty much how it is in most countries if your residence there relies on a work permit/visa, iirc Eire is one of the more relaxed giving you 6 months to find a new job if you lose your current one.
Yeah, think I dodged a bullet there ;-)
 

Freshy-ZN

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Well Ive been in Ireland for 2,5 weeks now. Still finding my feet and getting all the requisite Gov stuff done. Have short term accommodation booked till 22 June and need to find something else before then.

The wife is doing a course for which she will receive a recognized qualification and is being paid while doing the course as well as them paying for the course itself. This is great but its not a permanent contract of employment yet and landlords are wanting that. I am stuck looking after the 3 kids for now until shes finished the course so cant look for work yet. Its a bit of a pickle at the moment.

Making a final decision on a car in the morning. Its a 2007 Zafira 1,6 petrol. with 139k miles on the clock. Car is €1000 and the best insurance I can get is €1250. Going to have to take the punch the first year and build up a driving record. Second year should be significantly cheaper if we don't have a claim. I have noticed there are a LOT of old cars on the road but they seem to be in a better state of repair than similar aged vehicles in SA. No doubt the annual roadworthy testing (called NCT here) of vehicles over a certain age (think 10 years) and every two years prior to that makes sure there are very few real clap traps on the road. Road tax is horrendous and is based on engine size up to a certain year and more recently it is based on emission ratings for each model.

Housing shortages are very real especially in the bigger cities like Dublin and Cork. Less so as you move out and away from commuter towns. Public transport NOT like the UK. A car is a must for large swathes of the country.

Beautiful place as everyone knows but theres some social aspects I dont think Im going to like here.
 

Lupus

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What's the social aspects you're not going to like?
 

Freshy-ZN

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Was disappointed at the amount of people who litter. The place looks clean and tidy thanks to the constant activities of cleaning crews but stop and watch people for a little while and you see it.

There’s seems to be no real spirit and passion. Politics and society are glum with a few frothy sideshows. I get a distinct feeling of ‘lazyness’. People play everything safe and non-committal.

I suppose I wanted safe and boring for my kids sake mainly and I seem to have gotten what I wished for. But a little spark and joie de vivre would be nice.

Also it’s a bit liberal for my liking.
 

jack_spratt

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Paying R34k for 2 medium sized dogs end May ..... shop around, you're being quoted a high price. Taking your car and household stuff is an expense you can (and majority do) forego. Just buy new once over there, it's cheap
I would buy new dogs too. I am serious.
 
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