Immigrating to Ireland

zippy

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#21
My advice : Dont ship your household contents or your car. Sell the lot. Save you lots of expenses and grief.

Rent a furnished place and build your household contents as you need them.

And the dogs.....more grief.

And you do need a visa if you want to work. Look for a job on "free tourist" visa is a sure way of getting kicked out of the country and risking everything.

Good luck, though
 

Cube3

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#22
I would agree with Zippy.... get rid of everything here and go over with essentials/clothing/laptop etc.

Personally I wouldn't send the dogs over, but then if you happy to spend that money on them that is up to you. I have heard stories where pets don't survive too long after moving overseas, but that is probably not true for every case.
 

marco

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#23
I stand to not be corrected on the visa. The OP will not need a visa at all even if he only has a SA passport. He needs a permit to work in Ireland plus a letter of appointment from an employer. This does not guarantee a job.
 

stixx

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#24
I am busy with emigration to a mainland European country. I am going to get a furnished apartment there and build up my possessions. Taking/buying a car is totally unnecessary as the public transport is really great. Also, I need to get a work permit/permanent residence permit before I can even work there. I am not 100% sure about Ireland especially with the immigration laws. I would not take a risk looking for a job without a work permit as they can easily ask you to leave the country if you are breaking the law. So do your research properly. Moving abroad is not easy at all.

Edit: Some of the documents that you need from Home Affairs take up to 3 months to come through, you will definitely need to plan around this.
 

marco

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#25
Irish immigration laws are very similar to the rest of Europe. You will be using the country's domestic immigration laws that differ from the set EU regulations. You will NOT be issued with a Permanent Residence Card until you complete your 5 to 7 year stay depending on the country. You will also not have freedom of movement until you get citizenship of that country. Your residency permit is only valid within that country.

Finding a job without the knowledge of the language is nearly impossible and you need to find the job before you come here.
 

signates

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#27
I would also suggest buying that side as the need arise. Gumtree in the UK is a good start for decently priced second hand appliances. Not so many scammers as the SA gumtree site. I even found her flat on gumtree.

My wife just relocated to the UK last week with only two suitcase for her clothes, hairdryer and laptop. She's sharing a furnished flat with one person. While she does miss the driving experience, she says she doesn't need a car and get around easily using the bus and train. It might be different when I move over with the two kids at the end of the year. Fortunately she also lives about 1km from her work.
 

signates

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#29
What can you get for your current appliances, furniture and car?

Also most places I've seen to rent will at least have kitchen white goods such as stove fridge and washing machine, even unfurnished places.
 

diabolus

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#30
I've only travelled to Ireland a few times, it being the cheapest flight from Amsterdam (about 30-40 eur to Dublin) , but i am rather surprised about this:


1. Heating bills are around 400 euros a month""

Really? That's insane, in NL it's like 100 eur a month for elec+gas+heating for a 2 bedroom apt ~ 60 m^2 . Or are you referring to something else by "heating".


8. Owning a car in Ireland is near unaffordable due to the excessive insurance costs. Insurance on a car often costs more than the actual car in comparison to installments.

This is definitely a thing in NL, but here you 100% don't need a car. However Ireland i did not see how you'd get around without a car.... Dublin got some busses/trains (and a million taxis) , but everywhere else i've been there's almost nothing, not even sure how you'd travel outside of Dublin without a car. Surprised it would be so expensive to own a car there , considering the lack of public transport (albeit still a ton better than anything in SA). At least you (hopefully) would get places with a garage/drive way , in NL you often have to rent a parking spot for your car seperately from your house. (in amsterdam you might not even get that).
 
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RVQ

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#31
Houses are typically a lot smaller in the EU/UK, bringing over furniture puts you in the situation that you going to be looking for a house that fits your stuff rather than your needs, which can be a costly decision.
 

diabolus

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#32
Irish immigration laws are very similar to the rest of Europe. You will be using the country's domestic immigration laws that differ from the set EU regulations. You will NOT be issued with a Permanent Residence Card until you complete your 5 to 7 year stay depending on the country. You will also not have freedom of movement until you get citizenship of that country. Your residency permit is only valid within that country.

Finding a job without the knowledge of the language is nearly impossible and you need to find the job before you come here.
That is surprising, is that Ireland specific? In NL, you get a work permit / residence card and this automatically qualifies you to travel within the schengen area freely. The work permit can be of any duration from 6 months to 5 years and counts as a visa for europe (do not need to be resident prior) . You can only work in the country of issue though, but you can go on holiday anywhere in europe (except the UK who's always been kicking us in the balls with this, maybe brexit will change their stance).
 

diabolus

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#33
Also i would personally not recommend moving with furniture , go to ikea online in the european country you're moving to, get the prices for that, compare with cost of shipping ... chances are it's cheaper to just buy it all new. NL, actually have ovens+fridges+dishwashers as a standard built-in (much like you always get a stove in an SA apt), plus you'll likely get a place half the size as in SA, where your giant double door fridge won't fit.
 

marco

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#35
That is surprising, is that Ireland specific? In NL, you get a work permit / residence card and this automatically qualifies you to travel within the schengen area freely. The work permit can be of any duration from 6 months to 5 years and counts as a visa for europe (do not need to be resident prior) . You can only work in the country of issue though, but you can go on holiday anywhere in europe (except the UK who's always been kicking us in the balls with this, maybe brexit will change their stance).
Five years ago we sold up and moved to Portugal. We then sold all again and moved to the UK and have been here for 1 month. I can speak with my experience and other expats experience throughout Europe from the forums.

Freedom of movement only applies under EU regulations and not under domestic immigration laws. Non EU immigrants will be issued with a Resident Permit under domestic laws. Non EU immigrants with EU spouses will be issued with an Article 10 Residency Card that will state "This card is issued to a family member of an EU citizen". This card and not the permit can be used in lieu of a visa but only when travelling with the EU spouse.
This is self evident.

Even if a German citizen brings in a non EU spouse and lives in Germany, the spouse will be issued with a Residency Permit and not an article 10 Residency Card. If they move to France then the spouse will be issued with an article 10 RC and can travel freely.
 
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diabolus

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#37
Five years ago we sold up and moved to Portugal. We then sold all again and moved to the UK and have been here for 1 month. I can speak with my experience and other expats experience throughout Europe from the forums.
.
I am actually more interested why you'd move out of portugal and to the UK of all places? Better money? Portugal seems like one of the closest countries in europe to get an SA like experience, property is cheap, lots of good weather, great beaches, economy is slooowly looking up and the portuguese are generally pretty casual/friendly people (where the dutch can be a bit weird sometimes) . However understandably salaries are pretty low there, but at the same time it is really cheap too. I've been traveling to lisbon extensively and still considering buying some sort of retirement/holiday place there instead of the netherlands (which is crazy expensive in comparison).
 

marco

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#38
@crocopede

Wow. Your stuff is super expensive.

We moved to the UK a month ago.
My queen size bed with bedding cost me € 225.00 and it is sturdy and super comfortable. Bought from IKEA.

Leather corner 4 seat sofa that transforms into a double bed. € 400.00.

40" Smart TV € 250.00

Kettle € 20.00. Microwave with grill € 40.00

No Fridge, Stove, washing machine needed as most homes have them as fixtures.

Most other stuff got for nothing or next to nothing in pristine condition on Facebook. Just collect yourself.

My daughter furnished almost her whole house for next to nothing via Facebook.
 

Dave

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#39
@crocopede

Wow. Your stuff is super expensive.

We moved to the UK a month ago.
My queen size bed with bedding cost me € 225.00 and it is sturdy and super comfortable. Bought from IKEA.

Leather corner 4 seat sofa that transforms into a double bed. € 400.00.

40" Smart TV € 250.00

Kettle € 20.00. Microwave with grill € 40.00

No Fridge, Stove, washing machine needed as most homes have them as fixtures.

Most other stuff got for nothing or next to nothing in pristine condition on Facebook. Just collect yourself.

My daughter furnished almost her whole house for next to nothing via Facebook.
Have you been out for a pint of beer yet?

;)
 

marco

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#40
I am actually more interested why you'd move out of portugal and to the UK of all places? Better money? Portugal seems like one of the closest countries in europe to get an SA like experience, property is cheap, lots of good weather, great beaches, economy is slooowly looking up and the portuguese are generally pretty casual/friendly people (where the dutch can be a bit weird sometimes) . However understandably salaries are pretty low there, but at the same time it is really cheap too. I've been traveling to lisbon extensively and still considering buying some sort of retirement/holiday place there instead of the netherlands (which is crazy expensive in comparison).
I don't want to hijack this thread so read my reasons on my blog.https://shareforum.co.za/shares/my-retirement-blog/375/ My name is Orca on that site. Read #387
 
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