Paul_S

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How are the subscribers going to pay for their data usage?
I can't see the annual TV license covering Internet usage if the users decide to use Facebook and Youtube all day long.
Will TV licenses be scrapped and a subscription be levied like DSTV? (Yeah right ...)
 

Ricard

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Dilusions of Grandeur. Telkom is going to install phone lines to every shack.... yeah right!
 

Paul_S

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Dilusions of Grandeur. Telkom is going to install phone lines to every shack.... yeah right!
I should imagine that wireless (3G/HDSPA) is going to be used but that will require GSM/CDMA resources and I'm sure CellC, Vodacom, MTN and 8ta are not going to be handing out wireless access for free even if it's only 50MB per month per subscriber.
Someone is going to have to pay.
 

skimread

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SA's Digital TV decoders to include Internet access
Shouldn't the article read "will be internet capable".

Anyone know what type of connection these boxes will support? CAT5 OR usb (wireless stick)
 

Ockie

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Oh...I thought the STB itself would act like a modem and utilize some kind of data stream via the Antenna to provide access. So then basically this wont really help in the penetration...no link to STB no access?
 

Bern

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How are the subscribers going to pay for their data usage?
A bloody good question and what access will this allow? Who is designing and running the return path network?
 

skimread

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I should imagine that wireless (3G/HDSPA) is going to be used but that will require GSM/CDMA resources and I'm sure CellC, Vodacom, MTN and 8ta are not going to be handing out wireless access for free even if it's only 50MB per month per subscriber.
Someone is going to have to pay.
Cellular tech doesn't make sense as the tech changes every 2 years. I suspect it will be internet capable and not include the connectivity device itself.
I hope the details of the device is published for public feedback.
 

techead

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broadband penetration to the poor.

doesnt make sense to me. poor are well... poor, and we all know how expensive bandwidth is.

they think people are gonna spend their dop money on cap? :wtf:
 

dualmeister

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Don't know how accurate this info is, but this is what I could find. No mention of LAN port, but there is a ...

There’s also a single USB port (for “future use”) in the draft spec.
The decoders will be capable of receiving both standard and high-definition (up to 1080p) broadcasts—with support for widescreen broadcasts—and must specifically ignore all services originating from non-terrestrial digital services. It’s unlikely that South African broadcasters will offer highly bandwidth-intensive 1080p channels.

Widescreen high-definition broadcasts will be “down-converted” to standard definition for television sets that don’t support it and displayed in a 16:9 “letterbox” format on 4:3 displays. The decoder will allow viewers to display the material in a letterbox format within a 4:3 frame or perform a 4:3 “centre cut-out” on the broadcast material and present this full-frame within the 4:3 display.

An on-graphics plane and on-screen display information will use the 4:3 aspect ratio, regardless of the video aspect ratio.

‘Future use’
According to the draft spec, the decoder must be able to receive audio signals of up to 5.1 surround sound and output at least two-channel PCM stereo.

In terms of outputs, the decoder will offer a composite video output port on an RCA socket and an HDMI port. There’s also a single USB port (for “future use”) in the draft spec.

The decoder will also feature an “RF bypass” system so that consumers can continue to watch analogue broadcasts during the “dual-illumination” period when both analogue and digital television will coexist in South Africa.

The draft spec says South Africa will use MPEG-4 coding for video and will use 8MHz channel spacing in the VHF and UHF bands and will be capable of receiving broadcasts in chunks of spectrum from 174MHz to 862MHz. The MHEG-5 standard will be used to provide interactive services, including teletext-like services.

All eleven of South Africa’s official languages will be supported on the decoder and offer subtitles if these are made available by a broadcaster.

The set-top box will have a minimum of 64MB of flash memory and 256MB of RAM, the draft spec says. The memory specification has been chosen to allow for the lowest component price, it says.

The unit will draw a maximum of 10W of electricity during normal operation, 6W when in active standby and 3W when in passive standby. Its front panel will have “P+” and “P-” programme selector buttons, “V+” and “V-” volume buttons and a standby/on button.
Source

Here is the document
 
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skimread

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Thanks dualmeister. If the want it to be an internet device I am sure will add a LAN connection. Wouldn't make sense if they don't.
 

system32

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I doubt the LAN port will help, or that it will help the "poorest of the poor"
The STB software soon gets out of date, and as technology moves on, becomes unusable as a web device.
Think using Win 3.1 with IE 1.0.
The HD-PVR has a LAN connection - but it's not usable.
Will be fun when the STB get infected with a virus.
 

Kosmik

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Sep 21, 2007
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Interesting. Large range (65kms) cells with data at kbps and short range (3.5kms) cells at mbps speeds.

But who's gonna pick up the data cost at the other end?
 
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