The Brexit Thread

The Voice

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A bit more Project Fear that is unexpectedly coming true!



Britain’s online shoppers have expressed their dismay after been hit with unexpectedly high post-Brexit charges on items ordered from countries in the EU.

Consumers have been asked to pay up to one-third extra in customs duties, VAT and additional delivery charges once they arrive in the UK.

It comes as one UK retail boss said British firms were considering abandoning or even burning goods returned by their EU customers who are also unhappy about unexpected charges, due to the costs involved in bringing the items back to Britain.

One shopper, Ellie Huddleston from London, told the BBC she had been asked to pay out £140 in unexpected costs from couriers DPD and UPS after buying a coat and blouses from EU retailers at £380.

“I sent both back without paying the extra fees and won’t be ordering anything from Europe again any time soon,” said the 26-year-old.

Customers have complained that they are not being told by online retailers that they will be liable for the extra costs – forcing many to refuse to pay when delivery companies turn up at their door.

One British shopper was asked to pay £77 in extra charges on clothes costing £245 purchased from a French retailer.
Louisa Walters told The Times: “DPD offered me two options – pay the fees or return the package. There was no way I was paying £77 so I clicked to not accept the package. I was very disappointed.”

Some UK retailers said they were considering giving up on many of the goods which EU customers have asked be returned over the costs and paperwork involved in bringing them back into Britain.
That's another pisstake though. It's cheaper to bring stuff in from SA.
 

Mephisto_Helix

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Friend with a small record label is losing euro customers over fees. Reckons it's costing them an extra 7-13 euros per record / cd so they're ditching him. Not saying either way whether it's good or bad in the long term because I really couldn't be arsed but no doubt there's short term casualties.
 

AfricanTech

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and another one


UK retailers are considering abandoning goods returned by EU customers, with some even thinking of burning them due to the cost and trouble of bringing them back into the country.

After the post-Brexit introduction of new paperwork and charges for goods crossing over the border, fashion industry boss Adam Mansell said it was “cheaper for retailers to write off the cost of the goods than dealing with it all”, adding the process includes at least four new charges and documents.

Teething problems tbh - once everyone has the teething issues sorted you'll know what you're In for at checkout (like VAT and customs when you buy from Amazon US from SA)

Edit: oh wait, you're referring to the extra cost...ja, that's a bummer but everyone knew things would be more expensive from the EU post Brexit right...right...

and they were happy to pay the price for being rid of those controlling gobshites right....
 

The Voice

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Maybe I'm a little slow, but please explain to me how exactly a British shopper can import French clothes from South Africa?
/whooooosh

Point is that they seem to just be making the numbers up when it comes to import/export duties at the moment.

The way this is going it will eventually be cheaper to fly to France, go on a shopping spree, stick it all in your luggage, and fly back to Blighty than it is to import it.
 

AfricanTech

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/whooooosh

Point is that they seem to just be making the numbers up when it comes to import/export duties at the moment.

The way this is going it will eventually be cheaper to fly to France, go on a shopping spree, stick it all in your luggage, and fly back to Blighty than it is to import it.

Unfortunately I think they'll catch you out at customs
 

Rkootknir

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Remember when the 'great and good' warned us that all the car manufacturers would pack up and leave?

How devastating that another lie is exposed!

View attachment 998724
That's because the UK automotive industry are continuing to follow the same standards as the EU (basically standards agreed through the UN in 1958 and 1998) - see page 512 of the TCA. There is almost no regulatory difference before Brexit and after Brexit for the automotive industry.
 

zippy

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That's because the UK automotive industry are continuing to follow the same standards as the EU (basically standards agreed through the UN in 1958 and 1998) - see page 512 of the TCA. There is almost no regulatory difference before Brexit and after Brexit for the automotive industry.

So the U.K. car manufacturers are still subject to EU regulations :) what a joke

If the U.K. does a trade deal with say, China, and the regulations are different, does that mean a U.K. manufacturer had to source exports to China from a different factory ?
 

AfricanTech

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Yikes!

British business faces £7bn red tape bill under Brexit border plan
Government’s ‘new start’ will generate 215m customs declarations a year and need 50,000 extra customs agents.

 

Hamish McPanji

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Nissan closing Sunderland definitely had a Brexit angle, and it’s still not completely safe, no matter what Aussie_Chris’s screenshot is saying.

Nissan doesn’t only build Juke in Sunderland, it also builds EV’s (Leaf in current production, unconfirmed now if new Qashqai EV will still be built in Sunderland). EV Battery pack production is likely coming to Sunderland though.
You seem to know alot about Sunderland, Dave
 

MachoPants

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Nissan wont be closing the Sunderland plant anytime soon. They need for the battery production in the EV vehicles so they can get the tax breaks and sales benefits in the EU.
 
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