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UNISA Computing vs Computer Science and Mathematics

Joined
Feb 12, 2018
Messages
2
#1
Who has completed either BSC Computing or BSC Computer Science and Mathematics, and can advise which is better for a software development career?
 

vic777

Expert Member
Joined
May 6, 2015
Messages
1,190
#2
Who has completed either BSC Computing or BSC Computer Science and Mathematics, and can advise which is better for a software development career?
I did BSc Computing. It depends, Computing is a bit of a hybrid, with a spread of computer science and informatics subjects. Personally, I think I would have enjoyed the BSc Computer science / maths degree more.

Both are good degrees - it depends on what your interests are. If you like maths, choose the maths stream. You still do maths in the computing stream (linear algebra, discrete maths, stats, calculus as an elective) but the maths stream has more maths modules
 

cguy

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
3,778
#3
Unless you hate maths, or don't have the ability, do the CS and Maths degree. It opens more doors later on. My experience was that doing a double major was very much like doing two degrees, and personally I got more out of the maths courses than the CS courses (since I had prior experience with CS concepts).
 

[)roi(]

Executive Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2005
Messages
5,642
#5
Most programming tracks today are diverging around Functional Programming which has it's roots solidly in mathematics: specifically calculus, abstract algebra and category theory. So if you can manage it, run the math side, because it's only going to simplify a lot down the line.
 

XennoX

Expert Member
Joined
Nov 15, 2007
Messages
2,199
#8
Take the mathematics route, unless you are comfortable with doing ad hoc study of mathematics. Currently doing the App. Maths + Statistics stream through UNISA, working as a Data Engineer and on the odd occasion I get to do some Data Science things.
 

anavi

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2018
Messages
4
#9
Unless you hate maths, or don't have the ability, do the CS and Maths degree. It opens more doors later on. My experience was that doing a double major was very much like doing two degrees, and personally I got more out of the maths courses than the CS courses (since I had prior experience with CS concepts).
Hi there - I was hoping that I could get some insight into your experience at UNISA with the Applied Math & CompSci degree.
- Did you do it full or part time? If the latter, what do you think is a manageable workload, 3 or 4 modules per semester?
- Last time I did math was in matric, which was a very long time ago, do you think its manageable to take math at this level without a refresher?
- Did you feel that there was enough support at UNISA, in terms of tutoring?

Thanks - any advice would be greatly appreciated!
 

Genisys

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
8,807
#10
Hi there - I was hoping that I could get some insight into your experience at UNISA with the Applied Math & CompSci degree.
- Did you do it full or part time? If the latter, what do you think is a manageable workload, 3 or 4 modules per semester
I did my degree part time, there is no universal answer to this, I did 3 modules, and even 5 at times, all while working, its manageable, but very difficult.

- Last time I did math was in matric, which was a very long time ago, do you think its manageable to take math at this level without a refresher?
Might be worth a refresher course.

- Did you feel that there was enough support at UNISA, in terms of tutoring?
Wrong university if you need tutoring, as far as I'm aware you do it all on your own, there is probably tutoring available, but not sure how to "get it".
 

[)roi(]

Executive Member
Joined
Apr 15, 2005
Messages
5,642
#11
Hi there - I was hoping that I could get some insight into your experience at UNISA with the Applied Math & CompSci degree.
- Did you do it full or part time? If the latter, what do you think is a manageable workload, 3 or 4 modules per semester?
- Last time I did math was in matric, which was a very long time ago, do you think its manageable to take math at this level without a refresher?
- Did you feel that there was enough support at UNISA, in terms of tutoring?

Thanks - any advice would be greatly appreciated!
If you haven't done any maths for a "very long time" and/or studied; then 3 or 4 modules is probably going to be a tough ask, especially if you're working full time; so why not start slow and ramp up once you're in a better position to gauge the module workload / effort vs your free-time.

As for tutoring; you might want to consider private tutoring. DM if you need help with that.
 

cguy

Expert Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2013
Messages
3,778
#12
Hi there - I was hoping that I could get some insight into your experience at UNISA with the Applied Math & CompSci degree.
- Did you do it full or part time? If the latter, what do you think is a manageable workload, 3 or 4 modules per semester?
- Last time I did math was in matric, which was a very long time ago, do you think its manageable to take math at this level without a refresher?
- Did you feel that there was enough support at UNISA, in terms of tutoring?

Thanks - any advice would be greatly appreciated!
I did my degrees full time, but they weren’t through UNISA. I suggest doing a refresher - perhaps make sure that you get breeze through a matric exam first. You can easily get lost without a good foundation.
 

anavi

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2018
Messages
4
#13
I did my degree part time, there is no universal answer to this, I did 3 modules, and even 5 at times, all while working, its manageable, but very difficult.



Might be worth a refresher course.


Wrong university if you need tutoring, as far as I'm aware you do it all on your own, there is probably tutoring available, but not sure how to "get it".
Thanks so much for sharing! Yes, a refresher course seems to be the best option. I'm thinking of working through the Khan Academy curriculum and then checking where I am at before registering for the course. UNISA also offers an extended pathway that offers a foundation math course.
 

anavi

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2018
Messages
4
#14
If you haven't done any maths for a "very long time" and/or studied; then 3 or 4 modules is probably going to be a tough ask, especially if you're working full time; so why not start slow and ramp up once you're in a better position to gauge the module workload / effort vs your free-time.

As for tutoring; you might want to consider private tutoring. DM if you need help with that.
Hi [)roi(] - thanks for you advice, I think I will opt for the minimum number of modules for year 1 and then see how I do. Regarding tutoring, I will definitely consider that as an option. If I get accepted into the programme, I will send you a DM to chat about the tutoring.
 

anavi

New Member
Joined
Sep 17, 2018
Messages
4
#15
I did my degrees full time, but they weren’t through UNISA. I suggest doing a refresher - perhaps make sure that you get breeze through a matric exam first. You can easily get lost without a good foundation.
Thanks, good suggestion! Yes, a strong math foundation seems to come up a lot in everything I read; even when transitioning from high school to university math.
 

cbrunsdonza

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 21, 2008
Messages
13,134
#16
Who has completed either BSC Computing or BSC Computer Science and Mathematics, and can advise which is better for a software development career?
An Honours is the best for you career along with developing your people skills.

I work with a mixture of top BSc graduates with some having dual majors with non-CS subjects from music to electrical engineering and they are all competent software engineers. These successful graduates also have good people skills which lands them the better jobs. Many will disagree with me but then again these are also the same engineers who hit their ceiling hard early in life.

In the last year I've been on both sides of the interview table and this is what get's people (and me) hired.
 
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