Web Squad ISP

wingnut771

Executive Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2011
Messages
5,946
Thanks im going 50/5 (for now).
Did websquad get your line installed?
How long did it take?
I did everything through shop.vumatel.co.za
1 hour.
EDIT: I applied in November (vuma site, vodacom free install), fibre installed February (you finally get the call from vuma, then I chose websquad instead of vodacom), then it's quick from there.
 
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jeevadotnet

Active Member
Joined
Nov 8, 2018
Messages
50
These speedtests means nothing: why?
1) all ISPs shape their traffic to give ookla best QoS
2) all tests should be at the same time, preferably at night when US is actually awake and everyone from GMT to GMT+5 is at home.

Posting speedtests from 7am means nothing.

Websquad is one of the only ISPs that peer locally with hurricane electric in Teraco Jhb. On seacom you peer over EU.

(I'm 200/200 + static ip with macrolan.co.za)
 

wingnut771

Executive Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2011
Messages
5,946
These speedtests means nothing: why?
1) all ISPs shape their traffic to give ookla best QoS
2) all tests should be at the same time, preferably at night when US is actually awake and everyone from GMT to GMT+5 is at home.

Posting speedtests from 7am means nothing.

Websquad is one of the only ISPs that peer locally with hurricane electric in Teraco Jhb. On seacom you peer over EU.

(I'm 200/200 + static ip with macrolan.co.za)
I'm sorry but I looked and can't find any tests done at 7am.
 

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
692
These speedtests means nothing: why?
1) all ISPs shape their traffic to give ookla best QoS
2) all tests should be at the same time, preferably at night when US is actually awake and everyone from GMT to GMT+5 is at home.

Posting speedtests from 7am means nothing.

Websquad is one of the only ISPs that peer locally with hurricane electric in Teraco Jhb. On seacom you peer over EU.

(I'm 200/200 + static ip with macrolan.co.za)

1) all is a big word.
The wingnut test taught us about speedtests we've never heard of before - must have been sleepless nights for our evil QOS masterminds...
That would imply that we apply some sort of Layer 7 protocol monitoring and policies.. we don't (It's fairly clear in our FUP and Ts and Cs).
2) It's pretty busy in Asia at 7am SAST.. Australia is about to call it a day. The internet is a busy place all day, and South Africa's traffic hardly makes a dent. What I'm trying to get to is that it's pretty easy to identify East-West congestion at a nth hop if it comes up and raise it with a transit provider who operates their own east-west routes and get them to fix it. It doesn't define whether a South African ISP has enough North-South capacity (when all we have is access to EU and Asia for now).
3) Not sure what you're getting at with that HE comment and Seacom reference.. care to clarify?
 

cavedog

Honorary Master
Joined
Oct 19, 2007
Messages
14,377
3) Not sure what you're getting at with that HE comment and Seacom reference.. care to clarify?
I'm guessing he means peering with HE locally you don't have direct access to a cable where as with Macrolan a Seacom company the traffic goes straight to seacom cable to go to EU.

I have zero knowledge about these things though and not sure but sounds maybe something like that.
 

abudabi

Expert Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2007
Messages
2,110
Just guessing here as I'm not sure how these things work (but keen for someone to explain)

Macrolan - https://bgp.he.net/AS37353
Websquad - https://bgp.he.net/AS328137
CISP - https://bgp.he.net/AS37680

The way I'm reading those links are that macrolan has 1 peer, websquad 2 and CISP 3 ?

Does that mean if seacom goes down, macrolan is dead?
Also seeing as both websquad and CISP list hurricane, does that refute the "one of the only ISPs that peer locally with hurricane electric " statement?
 

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
692
OK, let's start from the top to understand International transit a little better.

First, a submarine cable is not equal to internet. A transit provider is an Internet provider. We don't all plug into these submarine cables and boom, get speedy internet. Networks are a bit more complicated than that; they're a product of peering (letting other networks know about yours) and just how much peering you do. In fact, two networks can use the same cable and get vastly different route profiles.

There are a few big cable systems between the EU, Asia and SA:
https://manypossibilities.net/african-undersea-cables/

Most of these cables are parts of large consortiums (they have many stakeholders), Seacom being the only exception and privately owned. This leads to the Seacom business model - which we'll get to in a minute.

Traditionally, these cable systems land and the wholesale transit providers buy up L2 capacity on them. This isn't internet capacity, rather L2 point to point (eg. Ysterfontein to London) capacity along a cable route - just over a very long distance. The wholesale transit provider heads to the other end of the link and drops some routing equipment down to build a POP. At these POPs, they then establish peering (a free/paid exchange of traffic) with other networks from around the world, and usually purchase onward traffic from a larger tier 1 provider. To be tier 1 means that you've done this exercise extensively and you peer (freely) in almost all peering locations in the world - operating your own core network comprised of pops and many, high capacity L2 links between them.

The Seacom model is slightly different, they sell point to point capacity to large wholesalers who want to buy it, but also operate their own wholesale transit business. Their wholesale transit business breaks out from the cable in a few EU locations (Marseilles, London, Frankfurt amongst others). But this doesn't mean that Seacom are the only tenants on their own cable. Seacom also purchases redundant capacity on WACS if I'm correct, providing dual submarine routes to their own transit clients in SA and Africa.

Wholesale transit providers worth their salt must then purchase sufficient, redundant capacity over multiple cable systems to their routers sitting all over the world. The more routers they have, the more control they have over the L2 links between them and their onward capacity. ISPs then advertise their networks to these transit providers, who in turn let the rest of the world know that their (the ISP's) networks are available through a specific provider. This is the magic of BGP. So for example, our wholesale transit providers give us access to EU, ASIA and onward routes via WACS, SEACOM, EASSY, SAT3 and SAFE submarine cables to ensure we're protected against cable breaks. We utilise more than one transit provider in case something goes wrong on the provider's internal routing network and also to provide more options to other networks to find us.

This being said, an ISP can also purchase bulk L2 capacity between SA and the EU and establish all their peering and upstream relationships from there. Some do this.

To understand how it all works: Take a server, perhaps World of Tanks sitting in an Equinix facility in Chicago. WOT uses a provider on the NTT tier 1 wholesale network as their upstream and peers at Equinix Exchange, so two possible (probably more) routes exist to get to SA. To get to us, two options exist: 1. H.E peers in all Equinix facilities, so they pick up this traffic on a local exchange in Chicago, transit it down to SA and hands it to us. (here they have full control between Chicago and JHB). 2. Our second transit provider peers with NTT in Europe. NTT carries the traffic on behalf of their client (WOT) from Chicago to a peering point in London, hands it over to our transit provider there who hands it to us in SA.

So to sum up, transit providers and cable systems are not one and the same (even though one has a confusing business model). A single transit provider usually has more than one submarine cable at its disposal, sometimes even more than just two. An ISP can put their eggs in one basket and rely on a single transit provider to let the world know they're there - but if something goes wrong on that larger network, they're invisible to the rest of the world. Advertising over multiple transit providers means that other networks have more than one route to an ISPs network.
 

sand_man

Honorary Master
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
28,926
Happy? Stats look solid!!

I'm maybe a week away from canning Home-connect! They have no explanation for my iperf anomaly other than try a different version of the iperf tool. Actually, technically, they've shown me nothing!

They were going to send me server details to iperf, never sent it. They were going to send someone to check onsite, did an about turn on that too. The 1Gbps offering has been pulled off of their website as well as Vuma's, this offering wasn't/isn't ready for market. The best they could do was offer me free wireless mesh. Meh...
 

wingnut771

Executive Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2011
Messages
5,946
Happy? Stats look solid!!

I'm maybe a week away from canning Home-connect! They have no explanation for my iperf anomaly other than try a different version of the iperf tool. Actually, technically, they've shown me nothing!

They were going to send me server details to iperf, never sent it. They were going to send someone to check onsite, did an about turn on that too. The 1Gbps offering has been pulled off of their website as well as Vuma's, this offering wasn't/isn't ready for market. The best they could do was offer me free wireless mesh. Meh...
Very happy.
1Gbps is irrelevant as packet loss happens between 11-200mbps.
 

Concentric

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2017
Messages
774
So my experience:
Signed up with web squad on Sunday, PMd @websquadza a couple of questions that I had.
He answered quickly...on Sunday evening i might add.

Accounts organised the Vumatel installation invoice for me on Monday which i paid.
Dealt with Martha over the phone, she was friendly and super helpful!
Called again a couple of times to follow up, never waited in a call queue, each time the staff where friendly, and answered all my questions.
Vuma did the install on Thursday.
Called WebSquad at 5:30 to ask if i could pay so i could get my login detail.
Lady said they will only invoice the next day, but gave me login details so i could connect anyways.
Static ip was configured, and my line is live.
I also really likes that the staff dont just give you standard replies, and dont treat you like an idiot.
They where all super friendly!
Thank you @websquadza , and keep up the epic work!!!!




International seems a bit weak, but im still a happy camper. (Am on wifi)

EDIT: Downloads from my Hetzner Germany server are maxing out my line so all good :)
 
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wingnut771

Executive Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2011
Messages
5,946
So my experience:
Signed up with web squad on Sunday, PMd @websquadza a couple of questions that I had.
He answered quickly...on Sunday evening i might add.

Accounts organised the Vumatel installation invoice for me on Monday which i paid.
Dealt with Martha over the phone, she was friendly and super helpful!
Called again a couple of times to follow up, never waited in a call queue, each time the staff where friendly, and answered all my questions.
Vuma did the install on Thursday.
Called WebSquad at 5:30 to ask if i could pay so i could get my login detail.
Lady said they will only invoice the next day, but gave me login details so i could connect anyways.
Static ip was configured, and my line is live.
I also really likes that the staff dont just give you standard replies, and dont treat you like an idiot.
They where all super friendly!
Thank you @websquadza , and keep up the epic work!!!!




International seems a bit weak, but im still a happy camper. (Am on wifi)

EDIT: Downloads from my Hetzner Germany server are maxing out my line so all good :)
Download https://www.speedguide.net/downloads.php
Install it, run as administrator, set slider to 50mb, choose optimal, save and restart, assuming you on windows pc ;)
 
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