Salaries in job posts

mr_norris

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Jun 12, 2007
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Maybe there are companies and recruitment agents that really try go above and beyond when it comes to getting a good CTC. However, every single one I've dealt with has asked for my payslip, added a couple percent on, and marketed me at that salary - which way back when amounted to nothing over extra costs and time.

It put me off recruiters. From then on, when I was looking, if I didn't spot a potential CTC range in a job posting, I moved on.
 

whatwhat

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Let's say a company has many developers and they open another development role through advertising. One of the currently employed developers sees the posting and that it is offering more than they are earning (this can happen for many reasons), then you as an employer will now you have a difficult HR situation. It's a well known fact that companies ask employees to not discuss their salaries as it can create colleague and company tensions. Do you discuss your salary with everyone at work?

When you work at a company the position you are in has a salary bracket attached to it. As long as the job ad is in the same bracket for the same profile then existing people don't have to care or worry about it.

If the new person starts with a higher salary it is because they are are better negotiators.

But if you are offering a completely different bracket for the new start then you as a company/boss are not being fair to existing employees.
 

CamiKaze

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But if you are offering a completely different bracket for the new start then you as a company/boss are not being fair to existing employees.

This is where loyalty comes in.
A new start usually means that fresh ideas will come in, hence the higher salary.
Not only that, the industry bracket for the roles change/increase year on year.

A grad that started in 2010 will earn a lot less than a grad that started in 2019. That plays a role as well. Industry/market standard.
 

whatwhat

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I am not loyal to a job, you are giving up 8-10 hours a day of the prime of your life to a company and will happily let them fuxk you over? No thanks.

The new person might have new ideas but experience in the company and it's operations does also count.
 

CamiKaze

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I am not loyal to a job, you are giving up 8-10 hours a day of the prime of your life to a company and will happily let them fuxk you over? No thanks.

The new person might have new ideas but experience in the company and it's operations does also count.
I'm not disagreeing with you... :rolleyes:

I'm telling you how loyal people get fxcked over.
 

MrJacques

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Jul 21, 2015
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I don't like that I have to disclose my salary beforehand - I'm underpaid (vs market) and hiring companies tend to want to pay as little as they can, which is understandable, but not lekker for job seekers.
 

cguy

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Jan 2, 2013
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I don't like that I have to disclose my salary beforehand - I'm underpaid (vs market) and hiring companies tend to want to pay as little as they can, which is understandable, but not lekker for job seekers.
Regardless of your current salary, if you also give your salary expectations, and you’re the best candidate they’ve got, they would have to decide whether paying market rate for their best candidate is worth losing their best candidate. If they opt to pass because they don’t want to pay market rates, it’s probably not a company you would want to work for anyway.
 

Ancalagon

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Regardless of your current salary, if you also give your salary expectations, and you’re the best candidate they’ve got, they would have to decide whether paying market rate for their best candidate is worth losing their best candidate. If they opt to pass because they don’t want to pay market rates, it’s probably not a company you would want to work for anyway.

You can really only reach those salary expectations if you have multiple offers for your skills. Then you have a better chance of reaching your true market value.

Although, with that being said, my perception is that companies don't like it when candidates play offers against each other. So, if you aren't careful with this, it can backfire.

I think what helps here is having a recruitment agent that you can trust. You can share your current compensation with them, and your expected salary. Your recruitment agent has a vested interest in getting you as much money as they can. They might know that the budget for the role meets your expectations, which means (in theory) as long as you perform well in the interview, you can get what you want.

With that being said, I have heard of companies that refuse to give new employees a good raise over what they were previously on, just out of principle. I really hope that market forces sort this out, because that should mean that they miss out on the most talented developers. But sadly, I don't think it works that way.
 

Ancalagon

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This is where loyalty comes in.
A new start usually means that fresh ideas will come in, hence the higher salary.
Not only that, the industry bracket for the roles change/increase year on year.

A grad that started in 2010 will earn a lot less than a grad that started in 2019. That plays a role as well. Industry/market standard.

I am pretty sure that if my company were to rehire me for my current role, they would have to pay me 10-15% more than what I'm on now. This is despite giving me a 1% raise "because of corona".

With any luck, I might find out the truth of this statement in a few weeks. I'm looking for a job at the moment, and if I land on, I should get a counter offer. The counter offer then is what my company could afford to pay me, but didn't want to.

I have a sneaky suspicion that, when companies decide on compensation for existing employees, they reserve a little to pay for counter offers for employees that resign.
 

Johnatan56

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I am pretty sure that if my company were to rehire me for my current role, they would have to pay me 10-15% more than what I'm on now. This is despite giving me a 1% raise "because of corona".

With any luck, I might find out the truth of this statement in a few weeks. I'm looking for a job at the moment, and if I land on, I should get a counter offer. The counter offer then is what my company could afford to pay me, but didn't want to.

I have a sneaky suspicion that, when companies decide on compensation for existing employees, they reserve a little to pay for counter offers for employees that resign.
Tbh, you should never stop going to interviews even if you already have a job, always have a couple lined up just to gauge the market and if your company ever folds you don't have to search, you already have a list of potential companies.

This doesn't mean drop your current company all the time, just be aware of what exists in the market and always have a plan in case things go south.
 
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