Salaries in job posts

Ho3n3r

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Apr 5, 2012
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You should never be giving a new employer any indication of your previous salary anyway. How are they renegotiating like that? If you have already signed an employment contract then they cannot force you to accept a lesser salary. If you have not signed anything then you can simply walk away with no repercussions to you.
I have never had an interview where they don't ask, besides my first job interviews where I had never been employed before. How do you avoid it if you can't control what they're asking?
 

Johnatan56

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Aug 23, 2013
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Most is not all, this is merely one example of why salary is not always advertised. There are others.


The quickest solution where salary is not advertised, is to forward your pay scale to the company concerned and state your requirements up front. Keeping your CV up to date is good practice for anyone. Applying for a position should never take long or be a big effort.
A large majority are not publicly funded companies.
Your solution is bad. Why should the employee have to go do the work of the company in order to know the salary band within which they are operating. They put out the add, they need the employee.
 

Johnatan56

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As I said, there may not be a clear salary band, especially where a specific skill set is required. Sometimes there's a ceiling only. Advertising the ceiling can create unrealistic expectations.
The salary band will always be clear, companies don't just go out and say we want this position filled. They are clearly informed/have planned what the costs are for that position. You couldn't run a company any other way.
 

Nerfherder

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So the companies have no clue whatsoever what they want to offer for the position. Lovely budgeting.
What's the point of giving an amount if you are only going to leave for more than what you are currently getting and they will only hire someone for what they are worth
 

Johnatan56

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What's the point of giving an amount if you are only going to leave for more than what you are currently getting and they will only hire someone for what they are worth
lol, the guy deleted his posts. Check my quotes.
 

cguy

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What's the point of giving an amount if you are only going to leave for more than what you are currently getting and they will only hire someone for what they are worth
Unless a (relatively) high earner is actively looking to move jobs, they generally won't bother to inquire about a position without a salary max that exceeds where they currently are. The poster will only get inquiries from those that are paid below industry standard or are unemployed - by leaving the range out, the poster is creating selection bias to their disadvantage.
 

nkawit

AllWorldIT
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From an employer point of view and fairly working out what a position is worth, is using a service provider like Payscale entering in everything on the CV/discussed and getting a 3rd party report for what the position is worth a good idea?
 

Hamster

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From an employer point of view and fairly working out what a position is worth, is using a service provider like Payscale entering in everything on the CV/discussed and getting a 3rd party report for what the position is worth a good idea?
Problem with sites like Payscale as that the high earners are busy people who more than likely can't be arsed with submitting their details to it.
 

Dove

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Apr 7, 2008
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its rude / incomplete not to at least put a range.. cudnt agree more.. we going to waste everyone's time by making a extremely overqualified/ someone with a large amount of experience apply for a junior job due to the job advert being set up in such a way that one thinks it is for a senior position.

The salary bracket will help in giving an estimate of the difficulty of the job and the experience/qualifications required. It should be a must.
 

Aethislegur

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Dec 31, 2018
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Rather put recruiters on an Ignore list then if no indication is done. Generally, and in IMO, if salary isn't mentioned, the company recruiting wants a slave.
I know this response is old but I think it's worth mentioning the below.

Let's say a company has many developers and they open another development role through advertising. One of the currently employed developers sees the posting and that it is offering more than they are earning (this can happen for many reasons), then you as an employer will now you have a difficult HR situation. It's a well known fact that companies ask employees to not discuss their salaries as it can create colleague and company tensions. Do you discuss your salary with everyone at work?

While I'm also not a fan of a job posting not displaying a salary I do understand the psychological aspect. Logic does however dictate that the required skills should match the industry standard. If the job is for a highly skilled employee or management role then it may be worth posting a salary range but for anything less I don't think it's worth it.

If a job posting has no salary then it's as simple as emailing and asking the remuneration budget. If this is too difficult then I can only assume the applicant is a lazy millennial.

Another thing to think about is a job posting for an executive. What kind of issues would that create if employees knew their salary? I know all too well from personal experience the chaos that it creates when employees find out what execs earn.
 

SauRoNZA

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I know this response is old but I think it's worth mentioning the below.

Let's say a company has many developers and they open another development role through advertising. One of the currently employed developers sees the posting and that it is offering more than they are earning (this can happen for many reasons), then you as an employer will now you have a difficult HR situation. It's a well known fact that companies ask employees to not discuss their salaries as it can create colleague and company tensions. Do you discuss your salary with everyone at work?

While I'm also not a fan of a job posting not displaying a salary I do understand the psychological aspect. Logic does however dictate that the required skills should match the industry standard. If the job is for a highly skilled employee or management role then it may be worth posting a salary range but for anything less I don't think it's worth it.

If a job posting has no salary then it's as simple as emailing and asking the remuneration budget. If this is too difficult then I can only assume the applicant is a lazy millennial.

Another thing to think about is a job posting for an executive. What kind of issues would that create if employees knew their salary? I know all too well from personal experience the chaos that it creates when employees find out what execs earn.
Happily agree with all points above.

However when you do email and ask and the response is “market related” or “what is your expected salary” then said recruiter can **** right off.
 

Aethislegur

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Dec 31, 2018
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Happily agree with all points above.

However when you do email and ask and the response is “market related” or “what is your expected salary” then said recruiter can **** right off.
O ye I completely agree. If at that point they cannot provide a figure then they can take a hike. I would never go for an interview without having discussed my final expectation otherwise it wastes everyone's time.
 

WAslayer

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May 13, 2011
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It's simple really, I always something along the following lines to avoid wasting time:

I am interested, however, I can't leave my current role unless I get specific amount.. So, to avoid wasting both our time, please send me the expected salary amount and we can take it from there..

Has worked every single time I have used it..
 

ArtyLoop

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Dec 18, 2017
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Stating salary is "highly dependent" yada yada yada = "We are going to lowball you"
 

Batista

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Sep 2, 2011
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That is fine, then I dont respond to job listings that have no sort of salary range indication.

Everyone wins.
 

Ryan Innes

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Nov 30, 2011
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486
Some clients ask for the CTC not to be posted, I prefer to tell the prospective candidate what they're looking at during the initial call or email as not to waste their time.
 
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