Sous Vide immersion circulator

Randhir

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#62
not even a little?
what about spices (..."aromatics") ?
What exactly are you cooking? The combination of time, heat and salt will end up curing the meat. It won't be inedible, but it won't be what you're going for.

You can add pepper, crushed garlic etc. Just not excess salt.
 

Inevitability

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#63
What exactly are you cooking?
I got a 2.8kg piece of rump I bought last weekend sitting in the freezer.
Only the 2nd time ever I'm trying to make a steak myself. Last time didn't go well. This time I'm armed with my DIY sous vide.
I've never seen the point of buying expensive cuts of beef cos I won't eat it medium (...might change with time, but not now)
Now with DIY circulator I wanna slice some 1.5" rump steaks and have them done to 67°C (bottom end of 'well done').
Rump being among the tougher cuts, I've read that I need the longer cooking time to get the science/magic working and "turn collagen into gelatin"

The combination of time, heat and salt will end up curing the meat. It won't be inedible, but it won't be what you're going for.
You can add pepper, crushed garlic etc. Just not excess salt.
Ok... so no salt before sous vide, then.
 
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SukkaFoo

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#64
I got a 2.8kg piece of rump I bought last weekend sitting in the freezer.
Only the 2nd time ever I'm trying to make a steak myself. Last time didn't go well. This time I'm armed with my DIY sous vide.
I've never seen the point of buying expensive cuts of beef cos I won't eat it medium (...might change with time, but not now)
Now with DIY circulator I wanna slice some 1.5" rump steaks and have them done to 67°C (bottom end of 'well done').
Rump being among the tougher cuts, I've read that I need the longer cooking time to get the science/magic working and "turn collagen into gelatin"


Ok... so no salt before sous vide, then.
My 2c... Rump is a pretty tender cut. If you slice them into 1" steaks I wouldnt go over 2 hours MAX. Further, go for medium, doing the steaks well defeats the point of sous vide. Use the time and temp guides from chefsteps (https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/sous-vide-time-and-temperature-guide). I would go significantly lower, unless you are aiming for something much closer to "roast" beef. I really cannot reiterate the medium part, chefsteps recommends 57, if you feel strongly, maybe go for like 60, but 67 is going to give you something very different to a well done steak.
 

Inevitability

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#65
Rump is a pretty tender cut.
That changes everything!
If you look at the "tought cuts" section at the end of the ChefSteps link, it actually says medium rare is 65°C for 16 hours!
I thought Rump was a tough cuts cos it's up there near biltong meat

British_Beef_Cuts.svg.png
 

SukkaFoo

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#66
Yeah the US dont generally recognise the rump, its somewhere between the US version of tenderloin and sirloin.
 

Inevitability

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#67
Yeah the US dont generally recognise the rump, its somewhere between the US version of tenderloin and sirloin.
If so, that would mean that rump is a very decent cut!
I figured out why it was so cheap (R57/kg)... cos it's C-grade meat (...apparently C-grade is an older animal)
I wonder whether that would then mean it's equivalent to a tough cut?
 
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Randhir

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#68
That changes everything!
If you look at the "tought cuts" section at the end of the ChefSteps link, it actually says medium rare is 65°C for 16 hours!
I thought Rump was a tough cuts cos it's up there near biltong meat
55C - Medium Rare
60C - Medium

Don't drop below 55C for cooks over 3 hours.


If so, that would mean that rump is a very decent cut!
I figured out why it was so cheap (R57/kg)... cos it's C-grade meat (...apparently C-grade is an older animal)
I wonder whether that would then mean it's equivalent to a tough cut?
Rump steak isn't tough. If it's a tougher grade then you're going to have to wing it. Maybe 5 hours or so. The downside to this is that if the meat is more tender than you anticipated the end result could be a bit mushy.
 

Inevitability

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#69
I would go significantly lower, unless you are aiming for something much closer to "roast" beef. I really cannot reiterate the medium part, chefsteps recommends 57, if you feel strongly, maybe go for like 60
Don't drop below 55C for cooks over 3 hours.
Rump steak isn't tough. If it's a tougher grade then you're going to have to wing it. Maybe 5 hours or so.
Found something noteworthy... (apparently this guy is like the sous vide pioneer)
Douglas Baldwin said:
Indeed, collagen begins to dissolve into gelatin above 122°F to 131°F (50°C to 55°C) (Neklyudov, 2003; This, 2006). Moreover, the sarcoplasmic protein enzyme collagenase remains active below 140°F (60°C) and can significantly tenderize the meat if held for more than 6 hours (Tornberg, 2005)
So maybe I would have to do something like 58°C for 8 hours to get this enzyme magic working.
But I'm a bit hesitant cos I've never really eaten steak any way other than well done.

What I should really do is just dedicate the 2.8kg of rump to experimenting (one steak at a time) until I get to what tastes the best for me and the family.
Dunno if I am up to the task.
 

SukkaFoo

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#70
Found something noteworthy... (apparently this guy is like the sous vide pioneer)

So maybe I would have to do something like 58°C for 8 hours to get this enzyme magic working.
But I'm a bit hesitant cos I've never really eaten steak any way other than well done.

What I should really do is just dedicate the 2.8kg of rump to experimenting (one steak at a time) until I get to what tastes the best for me and the family.
Dunno if I am up to the task.
Well now. You've haven't lived until you've had a decent medium rare steak... That being said, my 2c I'd go with your original plan and do say 65 for 16 hours, but don't cut into steaks. Finish in the oven under the grill. You'll likely have an amazing roast on your hands. If you want steak go buy some decent steaks and sous vide them properly. For me even checkers rib eye done properly is excellent. Look for a steak with loads of marbled fat and do it for two hours with a good sear at the end.
 

Randhir

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#71
Found something noteworthy... (apparently this guy is like the sous vide pioneer)

So maybe I would have to do something like 58°C for 8 hours to get this enzyme magic working.
But I'm a bit hesitant cos I've never really eaten steak any way other than well done.
Baldwin wrote one of the first primers on SV, his guides are extremely trustworthy.

Well now. You've haven't lived until you've had a decent medium rare steak... That being said, my 2c I'd go with your original plan and do say 65 for 16 hours, but don't cut into steaks. Finish in the oven under the grill. You'll likely have an amazing roast on your hands.
I'd advise against this. 65C for 16 hours on what might be a tender cut could very well result in pulled beef, or even worse, stringy, dried out meat that isn't appealing at all.

If you want to end up with roast, then just slow roast it.
 

SukkaFoo

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#72
Baldwin wrote one of the first primers on SV, his guides are extremely trustworthy.



I'd advise against this. 65C for 16 hours on what might be a tender cut could very well result in pulled beef, or even worse, stringy, dried out meat that isn't appealing at all.

If you want to end up with roast, then just slow roast it.
Not sure C grade will be all that tender, plus super thick chunk of meat will take many hours to cook. What 2 hours per inch?
 

Randhir

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#73
Not sure C grade will be all that tender, plus super thick chunk of meat will take many hours to cook. What 2 hours per inch?
That's why he'd rather under prep it than over.

It' just a weird one. Maybe a good suggestion would be to carve it into smaller pieces and leave them to cook. Test at each time. If it's good, pull them out.
 

Inevitability

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#74
So I decided 2 things:
1. I would like to run at least 3 sous vide experiments this weekend. Haven't decided exactly what the experimental setups will be yet. Broadly speaking, it will be a short cook, medium-length cook, and long cook.
2. I'll start a new thread for the above, cos even though this is all related to sous vide, it's a bit off topic :( Apologies to the OP
 

Zenbaas

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#76
Anova selling for $99 currently. Only problem is I don't see SA listed as a shipping option. :/
 
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#79
I built a pretty decent unit on a budget using a STC-1000. It can control any applicance you plug into it such as a slow cooker or immersion water heater. Can do pics if anyone is interested.
I'm interested, any info relating would be great, even if you followed a tut online. Damn sous vide machine will cost me R3500 with import fees, pricey for something I'm still a bit unsure of. At the moment I'm testing my slow cooker with a particular amount of water, on low setting I can get 56 degrees. I'm going to give it a go today.
 

I.am.Sam

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#80
I'm interested, any info relating would be great, even if you followed a tut online. Damn sous vide machine will cost me R3500 with import fees, pricey for something I'm still a bit unsure of. At the moment I'm testing my slow cooker with a particular amount of water, on low setting I can get 56 degrees. I'm going to give it a go today.
did it work ?

other option is to make one
 
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