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Sous Vide immersion circulator

Nerfherder

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 21, 2008
Messages
23,834
Hope this is not too far off topic...
How much salt per kg of steak if I'm seasoning before sous vide?
I intend to do some cheap beef on a long cook at around 67°
Maybe 16 hours
The plan is:
Sear, salt, sous vide, sear, mushroom sauce :)
Should be: sous vide, salt, sear, mushroom sauce

Don't sear first... you will get food poisoning
 

Nerfherder

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Apr 21, 2008
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How do you reckon?
For the same reason you don't reheat cooked food too many times. Sous Vide is not actually cooking - more like digesting the meat, so will be cooling down between sears and given the amount of time there is risk of bacteria.

Also the 1st sear is going to be completely wasted.
 

Randhir

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Jul 4, 2007
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25,601
For the same reason you don't reheat cooked food too many times.
It's totally different. You aren't raising and dropping the temperature frequently, or going into the food danger zone. Searing will raise the temperature (mostly the exterior) and the SV will do the same to the entire cut.


Sous Vide is not actually cooking - more like digesting the meat
Nope. Sous Vide is definitely a method of cooking. What you're talking about is prolonged exposure to heat breaking down the proteins, similar to leaving something to braise for too long.

so will be cooling down between sears and given the amount of time there is risk of bacteria.
It won't though. Searing will raise the temperature, then it goes into the bag, then a post bath sear. There's no cooling time that puts the meat into excessive temperature range of the danger zone.

Also, pasteurisation of meat isn't just a product of heat/temperature, but also of time.

Also the 1st sear is going to be completely wasted.
Actually, the pre-bath sear helps build the crust to help the post-bath sear. This means that you don't have to sear as much post-bath to build up the crust, resulting in over-cooked meat.

Check out the Chefsteps test here.
 

cerebus

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Nov 5, 2007
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Interesting, I would have been afraid presearing would turn the surface into a rubbery mess.
 

cerebus

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Nov 5, 2007
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Why? It's the same as searing a roast before baking. No rubbery mess.
Because that's what normally happens when you pre-sear meat then expose it to water. But bearing in mind I have literally no experience with sous vide so it's based on other types of cooking like braising or whatever.
 

SauRoNZA

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Jul 6, 2010
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28,991
Because that's what normally happens when you pre-sear meat then expose it to water. But bearing in mind I have literally no experience with sous vide so it's based on other types of cooking like braising or whatever.
You aren't exposing it to water.

It goes into a vacuum sealed bag.

Also #teamrandhir

That being said the pre and post sear is a bit much.

I'd just follow the Serious Eats method.

http://www.seriouseats.com/2015/06/food-lab-complete-guide-to-sous-vide-steak.html
 
Last edited:

Spacerat

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Jul 29, 2015
Messages
741
Ok so I am in the US and thinking of buying a SV circulator. Any suggestions? Is the Anova good? Dont want to break the bank though.
 

Randhir

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Ok so I am in the US and thinking of buying a SV circulator. Any suggestions? Is the Anova good? Dont want to break the bank though.
I would have though so, but a quick look at the sous vide reddit seems to bring up a few complaints about Anova. I'd suggest looking into the Joule (if you can use it here), $189 on Amazon, but before you leave the US I'd make sure everything seems to be working 100%.
 

Zenbaas

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Oct 23, 2005
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I would have though so, but a quick look at the sous vide reddit seems to bring up a few complaints about Anova. I'd suggest looking into the Joule (if you can use it here), $189 on Amazon, but before you leave the US I'd make sure everything seems to be working 100%.
Aren't the issues with the Anova pretty much limited to their stupid change in policy where you were forced the "log in" when you were using it? (think it was the WiFi version).
 

Quad

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Joined
Nov 7, 2006
Messages
178
Nice to find a sous vide thread.

SO bought me a Severin bath with vacuum sealer. Haven't used it yet but will be making steaks this weekend.

Anyone have experience with the Severin?
 

Quad

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Joined
Nov 7, 2006
Messages
178
So I did two 28 day aged rib eye's sous vide on Saturday. Did them at 59 deg for 2 hours. Seasoned them with salt & black pepper and added a sprig of rosemary to the bag. Seared them afterwards. I added vacuum sealed asparagus about 45 mins before the end of cooking but the temp was too low for them so I sautéed them after the bath.

All I can say is fookmi, that was one of the best steaks I've had in a very long while.

I'm impressed with the Severin and even more so with the matching vacuum sealer which does a fantastic job.
 

Quad

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Nov 7, 2006
Messages
178
Does it only seal Severin brand bags? My Genesis is shot and I need to replace it
No. I bought the model FS 3609 from yuppiechef and in the manual it says the following:

Replacement bags
Any regular vacuum foil bags with a knobbed
surface structure on one side may be used
with this appliance. This type of surface
allows optimum air extraction. The width of
the bag must not exceed 30 cm.
Suitable replacement bags are available
at household stores or may be obtained
through SEVERIN Service, quoting article
no. ZU 3607 (20 x 30 cm) and ZU 3612 (30
x 40 cm).
It comes with a pack of the small bag but I bought a pack of the 30x40cm bags.
 

I.am.Sam

rehabilitated troller
Joined
Jun 14, 2011
Messages
78,505
So I did two 28 day aged rib eye's sous vide on Saturday. Did them at 59 deg for 2 hours. Seasoned them with salt & black pepper and added a sprig of rosemary to the bag. Seared them afterwards. I added vacuum sealed asparagus about 45 mins before the end of cooking but the temp was too low for them so I sautéed them after the bath.

All I can say is fookmi, that was one of the best steaks I've had in a very long while.

I'm impressed with the Severin and even more so with the matching vacuum sealer which does a fantastic job.
and no pics ?

you disappoint us :p
 

Nerfherder

Honorary Master
Joined
Apr 21, 2008
Messages
23,834
It's totally different. You aren't raising and dropping the temperature frequently, or going into the food danger zone. Searing will raise the temperature (mostly the exterior) and the SV will do the same to the entire cut.




Nope. Sous Vide is definitely a method of cooking. What you're talking about is prolonged exposure to heat breaking down the proteins, similar to leaving something to braise for too long.



It won't though. Searing will raise the temperature, then it goes into the bag, then a post bath sear. There's no cooling time that puts the meat into excessive temperature range of the danger zone.

Also, pasteurisation of meat isn't just a product of heat/temperature, but also of time.



Actually, the pre-bath sear helps build the crust to help the post-bath sear. This means that you don't have to sear as much post-bath to build up the crust, resulting in over-cooked meat.

Check out the Chefsteps test here.
Cool. Well I'm all for trying and testing.

I have only ever seen post sear and I agree with Sauron that I would only sear once.

The other thing is that after your sear there will be bleeding, you will lose a lot of moisture into the bag. i'm not sure if that is desired or not but in my mind you will get a grey messy soup round your steak.
 
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