2019 Salary Increase

ToxicBunny

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I would. If I'm expected to take a cut in my leave days, I need to be compensated accordingly. Those are paid days off which you will now be spending working...
100%....

I've turned down offers that were higher on the CTC aspect, but once I worked out the difference in leave and the cash value, the offer became considerably less attractive.
 

Mike Hoxbig

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100%....

I've turned down offers that were higher on the CTC aspect, but once I worked out the difference in leave and the cash value, the offer became considerably less attractive.
If I have to take a cut down to the basic 15 days, it equates to almost a full month's salary. It's nuts to even consider giving up your leave days for free...
 

ToxicBunny

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If I have to take a cut down to the basic 15 days, it equates to almost a full month's salary. It's nuts to even consider giving up your leave days for free...
Never ever would....

And the company was dumbfounded when I said thanks but no thanks, the offer isn't where I want it to be.. there response was but its x% over whats on your payslip... at that point I knew I had made entirely the right decision anyway.
 
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Their 8% could work out to less than your 2.9. Hard to judge unless you know what they're earning.

All these percentages here meaning nothing without knowing what it's a percentage of...
While true, That doesn't matter to me. My financial situation thanks to inflation means, my real income is dropping. Had worked out that in the last 5 years, inflation is about 26%, but the some total of my increases in the same period is around 17% .... So sucks to be me. Time to look around, or maybe go back to Europe. Waiting for election results before I make a decision.
 

krycor

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100%....

I've turned down offers that were higher on the CTC aspect, but once I worked out the difference in leave and the cash value, the offer became considerably less attractive.
Something I am considering too.. lots of companies have a policy of dropping it down to 15 or 18 at the start albeit the recommended is 21. Add an accrued policy and you easily sit above 28-35.

So need to factor in the cost of these days vs salary when evaluating jobs.
 

krycor

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Yup..

I also wish companies wouldn't ask for payslips. They should offer what they feel a person is worth or what the person asks for if they feel the value is there....
Good luck with that. The IT industry needs a proper skills/evaluation system vs salary but I don’t see this happening anytime soon.. been a lot of resistance vs that which I think just causes instability. Few know that like ECSA there is an IT one.. IITPSA.

If it was used correctly, life I feel would be better and you’d have mentors which takes the pressure off as career planning is not a solo act as it is in many dev shops.
 

ToxicBunny

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Good luck with that. The IT industry needs a proper skills/evaluation system vs salary but I don’t see this happening anytime soon.. been a lot of resistance vs that which I think just causes instability. Few know that like ECSA there is an IT one.. IITPSA.

If it was used correctly, life I feel would be better and you’d have mentors which takes the pressure off as career planning is not a solo act as it is in many dev shops.
100% agreed... its merely a pie in the sky wish mostly... companies generally don't want to pay people what they are worth, they want to pay the absolute minimum they can get away with.
 

CamiKaze

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100% agreed... its merely a pie in the sky wish mostly... companies generally don't want to pay people what they are worth, they want to pay the absolute minimum they can get away with.
I think that HR is the main culprit here.
For some odd reason, they think that "Manager" is part of their title so they can be dicks about everything, and how dare you question them...
They basically try to manipulate you into accepting the lowest possible offer.
Also... I don't know what it is, but I've seen HR managers earning a shst lot more than developers for an admin job. What's up with that? Are they supposed to be earning more because they get to see everyone's salary?
 

ToxicBunny

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I think that HR is the main culprit here.
For some odd reason, they think that "Manager" is part of their title so they can be dicks about everything, and how dare you question them...
They basically try to manipulate you into accepting the lowest possible offer.
Also... I don't know what it is, but I've seen HR managers earning a shst lot more than developers for an admin job. What's up with that? Are they supposed to be earning more because they get to see everyone's salary?
You are very possibly right on the HR front...

Also when you have a whole shyte ton of HR people in a large IT company, and not a single one of them is in any way shape or form IT savvy... drives me dilly. These are the people tasked with managing the people aspect as well as filtering CV's and such...
 

gamer16

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Yup..

I also wish companies wouldn't ask for payslips. They should offer what they feel a person is worth or what the person asks for if they feel the value is there....
But they'll never change unfortunately, case in point where I work they like to take unskilled (and cheap) people and put them in semi advanced positions, then wonder why the jobs aren't being done or done correctly, so they implement processes and issue warnings when stuff can't be done, pisses me off to no end.
 

*SynergyX*

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Do all of you just wait and see what your annual increase is, or do you ever try to discuss it at you annual performance reviews to say you worth more than the inflation 5%? assuming the performance review happens just before the salary increases?
 

gamer16

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Do all of you just wait and see what your annual increase is, or do you ever try to discuss it at you annual performance reviews to say you worth more than the inflation 5%? assuming the performance review happens just before the salary increases?
Review in this department is on the last day of work, which is useless as by then I've seen my bonus and don't give a f,uck what the manager has to say, won't even bring the increase up as my head would be bitten off.
 

Mike Hoxbig

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Do all of you just wait and see what your annual increase is, or do you ever try to discuss it at you annual performance reviews to say you worth more than the inflation 5%? assuming the performance review happens just before the salary increases?
I always ask for more even if I may not get it.

But you definitely won't get it if you don't ask. No harm in asking.

I have no idea why people shy away from this topic during their discussions. During the year the company is not shy about the work you do, so you must not be shy to ask for more moneh when it's your chance to have a say...
 

cguy

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Do all of you just wait and see what your annual increase is, or do you ever try to discuss it at you annual performance reviews to say you worth more than the inflation 5%? assuming the performance review happens just before the salary increases?
In my last job (when I had to do this), I would do this. In my experience it is extremely important to make your expectations know. After the first year or two of sub-standard increases, I mentioned that I was unhappy with my compensation, and I got the surprised response: "Oh, I never knew money was important to you."... Seriously! @#*$@#$*@ing Silicon Valley - like the only currency I would ever want is geek street cred.

It is important to make your intentions known well before the performance review. Ideally you want to time it just before your manager gets their bonus/increase pool allotment. If you wait for your performance review, it is possible (in fact, likely) that your numbers have already been submitted, even though this is long before the increase becomes visible. It also means, that the manager will enter your review meeting with an eye to support whatever allocation they have already made for you, and will be more rigid even if it hasn't been submitted already (especially, if it means that someone colleague they just said "Great job" too, is now going to get a smaller increase because of it).

At my current job, I have never had to express disappointment in my compensation or have a "conversation" with my manager beforehand. One of the nice things about working in finance, is that it is pretty well understood that money has value, and that if you do not treat your top employees well, they have enough savvy to look elsewhere.
 

Cius

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Do all of you just wait and see what your annual increase is, or do you ever try to discuss it at you annual performance reviews to say you worth more than the inflation 5%? assuming the performance review happens just before the salary increases?
I do a mix. The head honcho's here at the big bank decide the average increase across the division. Last few years it has averaged a fairly low number, below inflation anyways. Most years I just wait and see, one year I had a chat with the boss, showed him the history of my increases, and said look if I get another one of these sub inflation increases I can no longer afford to cut much else and I start job hunting. That year I got 10%. Thing is I know how the process works and for one person to get above the floor average, another person has to get less. The management has to divide it up as best as possible to retain talent. Same with the bonus if there is one. Hence you have to be careful about being too demanding as they are also between a rock and a hard place and might just decide your are not worth what they are paying you anyways and give you zero.
 

cguy

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I do a mix. The head honcho's here at the big bank decide the average increase across the division. Last few years it has averaged a fairly low number, below inflation anyways. Most years I just wait and see, one year I had a chat with the boss, showed him the history of my increases, and said look if I get another one of these sub inflation increases I can no longer afford to cut much else and I start job hunting. That year I got 10%. Thing is I know how the process works and for one person to get above the floor average, another person has to get less. The management has to divide it up as best as possible to retain talent. Same with the bonus if there is one. Hence you have to be careful about being too demanding as they are also between a rock and a hard place and might just decide your are not worth what they are paying you anyways and give you zero.
Actually, for all but one person to get above the floor average, one person has to get less.
Give everyone 2%, but give one person 1.99%. Then tell everyone but the last person that they were “above average”, and that one person, that they were 0.01% below the average increase. Due to the relativistic theory of motivational compensation, almost everyone is happy, and one person is mildly disappointed.

I’ve actually heard of this being applied in practice!
 

Rouxenator

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Company doing well does not translate to big increases. If they are on a cost cutting mission then staff cost is an easy win.
 

The Voice

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Other departments (projects and sales) didn't hit their targets, so the entire company got nailed. IF any increases were given, they were capped at 1% (inflation is 2%) - and no cost of living increases for anyone, either. 5% bonuses were also dropped to about 4%.

So, time to move on. Pity, as I've been with the same company for almost 4 years, and they've always looked after me. But I can't do another 12 months on the same salary.
 

Sparkz0629

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big bank here, and there was a cap of 3% for everyone.
luckily i got that, and had a concurrent promotion, so an additional 6% the month after increases. Else i would have been slightly peeved.
 
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