Router Battery Backup

werfie

Expert Member
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Aug 16, 2010
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#3
A large 12v car battery will work well.
I have seen a guide on how to do that whole setup, but I am afraid my patience (read technical ability) for such projects are quite limited. A plug and play solution would be ideal.
 

ArtyLoop

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Dec 18, 2017
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#8
I am about to cut over all the network switches and the fibre ONT to a battery backed supply.
Most of the items except a few are 12V DC
 

Rickster

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Jul 31, 2012
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15,686
#9
I have seen a guide on how to do that whole setup, but I am afraid my patience (read technical ability) for such projects are quite limited. A plug and play solution would be ideal.

What guide?


Just get a old router adapter, cut off the adapter and connect it directly to the battery.
 

ArtyLoop

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Dec 18, 2017
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#11
Here's what you need:
1 x 12V 7.2Ah gel lead acid battery (the standard alarm battery)
A charger designed for charging that battery
A voltage regulator to 5V DC if your router is designed to work from 5V DC

The charger has to supply 13.8V nominally.. 12V regulated (as per most wall bricks) is not going to cut it. Also most wall bricks will see the battery's charge current and internal impedance as a short and go into short circuit protection.

You can get all of this kit from any decent security shop for cheap.
 

joker08

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Sep 4, 2018
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269
#12
Anyone using anyone of these two to backup ADSL router during power outages? If so, any feedback or other relatively cheap solutions?

https://www.geewiz.co.za/ups/80323-linkqnet-epower-12v-25w-dc-ups-for-d-link-routers.html

OR

https://www.geewiz.co.za/ups/68271-...SFDRREF=SFDR_231141486&ptcid=2961_1_331250391
has anyone tried using these on those raycore devices??? also I have to power the raycore device and the TPlink router. The raycore requires 12v and tplink 9v, how do u do that ?
 
Last edited:

isie

Executive Member
Joined
Jan 16, 2010
Messages
9,717
#14
Has anyone actually noticed whether their fiber line stays connected during load shedding?
it stays live - so if you have power you can still have the internet.

I have a long run UPS and fibre is still live during load shedding power outages
 

GoB

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Jan 7, 2008
Messages
1,234
#15
Here's what you need:
1 x 12V 7.2Ah gel lead acid battery (the standard alarm battery)
A charger designed for charging that battery
A voltage regulator to 5V DC if your router is designed to work from 5V DC

The charger has to supply 13.8V nominally.. 12V regulated (as per most wall bricks) is not going to cut it. Also most wall bricks will see the battery's charge current and internal impedance as a short and go into short circuit protection.

You can get all of this kit from any decent security shop for cheap.
So does the 13.8V go to the routers as well?

I've been piggy-backing some other devices off my 7.2Ah alarm battery but was hoping a better 12V UPS with ~20Ah battery could be bought off the shelf. Thinking of also connecting a switch with LED lights to it.
 

ArtyLoop

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Dec 18, 2017
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4,564
#16
So does the 13.8V go to the routers as well?

I've been piggy-backing some other devices off my 7.2Ah alarm battery but was hoping a better 12V UPS with ~20Ah battery could be bought off the shelf. Thinking of also connecting a switch with LED lights to it.
Yes it does, but since the router will have on-board regulators to 3.3V and 1.8V for the VLSI chips, there's no issue...
 

GMAN03

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 16, 2011
Messages
135
#17
Just do a general search for CCTV battery backup, there are loads of options. I've been using one for a while and have some MR16 downlights on it too. You can easily increase the battery capacity too.
 

GoB

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Jan 7, 2008
Messages
1,234
#18
Just do a general search for CCTV battery backup, there are loads of options. I've been using one for a while and have some MR16 downlights on it too. You can easily increase the battery capacity too.
Yes I see the CCTV power supplies... just don't know enough to see what the efficiency would be and whether an intelligent charger wouldn't be better.

I'm guessing I could simply connect the CPE, router, alarm, raspberry pi + sensors directly to my current alarm battery/charger if the charger can handle it? Then assuming I can add batteries as I want, I can connect a higher load to the batteries only during loadshedding (lights)?
 

ArtyLoop

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Joined
Dec 18, 2017
Messages
4,564
#19
Yes I see the CCTV power supplies... just don't know enough to see what the efficiency would be and whether an intelligent charger wouldn't be better.

I'm guessing I could simply connect the CPE, router, alarm, raspberry pi + sensors directly to my current alarm battery/charger if the charger can handle it? Then assuming I can add batteries as I want, I can connect a higher load to the batteries only during loadshedding (lights)?
Get the following:
1 x 12V "leisure battery" intended for caravans
1 x 10A charger from Centurion Systems (this beast is the boss)
Problem solved indefinitely
 
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