Web Squad ISP

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
2,362
@websquadza Do you have any new information for me from Vuma? I am not getting a response from my latest message to support. Ticket 964479

This has been escalated to NOC and our accounts and service delivery team as the delays on this issue have been unacceptable. Thanks for your patience here. We are on it and will keep you updated. I chatted to our team in this regard.
 

rvanwyk

Expert Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2007
Messages
1,628
Will give it a go. Had it on 1424. Will monitor.
Made no difference. Checked on Samsung Smart TV (wired) and two AppleTV's (one wired, one wireless) and all do the same. Takes around 25 seconds for anything to start playing. Accessing Prime from my MacBook (web interface) it takes around 6 seconds for any video to start and starts in very low quality and eventually gets better. The only thing that I changed was the PPPoE username and password when I moved to WebSquad beginning this month. There's definitely something up.

On a side note, for VPN purposes, how do I get a static IP? Request through support desk or can I send you a PM?
 

ijacobs3

Expert Member
Joined
Oct 15, 2009
Messages
3,505
Made no difference. Checked on Samsung Smart TV (wired) and two AppleTV's (one wired, one wireless) and all do the same. Takes around 25 seconds for anything to start playing. Accessing Prime from my MacBook (web interface) it takes around 6 seconds for any video to start and starts in very low quality and eventually gets better. The only thing that I changed was the PPPoE username and password when I moved to WebSquad beginning this month. There's definitely something up.

On a side note, for VPN purposes, how do I get a static IP? Request through support desk or can I send you a PM?

FNO?

I’m on vuma trenched and have static IP?
 

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
2,362
Made no difference. Checked on Samsung Smart TV (wired) and two AppleTV's (one wired, one wireless) and all do the same. Takes around 25 seconds for anything to start playing. Accessing Prime from my MacBook (web interface) it takes around 6 seconds for any video to start and starts in very low quality and eventually gets better. The only thing that I changed was the PPPoE username and password when I moved to WebSquad beginning this month. There's definitely something up.

On a side note, for VPN purposes, how do I get a static IP? Request through support desk or can I send you a PM?

Try one more MSS;1412. That’s odd; AWS is locally peered and there’s basically a single hop between you and their network. No issues there either. But will keep looking.

For the static IP; please drop support a mail.
 

Gimli

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2005
Messages
637
Hi @websquadza you might have commented on this before. Check how WebAfrica and now Afrihost is running away with the IPV6 adoption stats vs yourself who have been in the IPV6 game much longer. Why is it that @Afrihost reports >11% adoption and Websquad only 3%? WebAfrica is close to 50%. Could it be that your IPV6 network is too slow so that the browser then falls back to IPV4?

1628538514511.png
 

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
2,362
Hi @websquadza you might have commented on this before. Check how WebAfrica and now Afrihost is running away with the IPV6 adoption stats vs yourself who have been in the IPV6 game much longer. Why is it that @Afrihost reports >11% adoption and Websquad only 3%? WebAfrica is close to 50%. Could it be that your IPV6 network is too slow so that the browser then falls back to IPV4?

View attachment 1123320

You're using our IPv6 in dual stack on our network, does it feel slower and/or are you seeing failed requests or fallback to IPv4?

DNS will always favour v6 instead of v4 if it’s available (irrespective of speed). DNS lookups will only fall back to v4 if no response is received. If anything, failing to v4 would maybe be related to latency. And I'm pretty sure 2606:4700:4700::1111 returns the same latency as 1.1.1.1. Same goes for Quad9 and Google's DNS?

APNIC's results, while informative, are not entirely an accurate reflection of v6 adoption across a network; and don't infer network wide IPv6 adoption stats - just the proportion of devices (samples - remember v6 gives each device an IP) that viewed a particular ad from an unknown ad syndicator and whether that ad was requested using IPv6 (IPv6 preferred) or served to a device with IPv6 addressing (IPv6 capable). While a very smart way to measure adoption, I wouldn't argue 100% reflective. Results from someone like Google/Netflix - who actually serve content to almost every eyeball on all networks in SA (and the world), would help paint a better picture in my opinion. That said, yes, some networks have raced ahead on APNIC's standings (which are the only numerical standings available at the moment, so let's go with it) which is great to see.

Looking at sample sizes, native IPv6 support on Vuma reach has had a positive, large impact on numbers for two of the networks there. Hopefully Vumatel follows suit with trenched to help boost everyone else's numbers (a large proportion of our FTTH clients are on trenched). I see a few WISPs in the list also actively rolling out v6 - which is great.

There definitely isn't a technical/network related reason our APNIC stats are where they are. We'd definitely like to see more IPv6 traffic on our network (and more of those viewing APNIC's ad syndicator :ROFL:), but it has been growing steadily on our side and we are happy with the progress. We don't remotely control most clients' routers, this means relying on clients to enable IPv6 on their routers (which has been slower than hoped). We have enabled IPv6 on routers we do manage and do enable IPv6 by default on new clients, so we expect to see more eyeballs on APNIC's ads soon enough.
 

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
2,362
This might be the crux of the matter
Fair enough, but even then I don't think we'd see APNIC's number jump significantly. 3.27% (13) of 428 samples is fewer IPv6 capable devices than we have in our office. Let alone the number of unique devices in my home (or likely yours); which is why I argue that APNIC's methodology is flawed... While these kinds of results are a great start, they need some work.
 

Gimli

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2005
Messages
637
Fair enough, but even then I don't think we'd see APNIC's number jump significantly. 3.27% (13) of 428 samples is fewer IPv6 capable devices than we have in our office. Let alone the number of unique devices in my home (or likely yours); which is why I argue that APNIC's methodology is flawed... While these kinds of results are a great start, they need some work.
They don't publish absolute numbers so assuming 428 of your users unwittingly provided a sample and of them 13 were ipv6 capable, it works out to be 3%. Afrihost having a much bigger user base provided a much bigger sample of which 10% were Ipv6 capable. Question is, is your 428 vs Afrihost 51000 sample size a fair reflection of the raito of your user base? Also why would users differ in their use of the Internet between the two ISPs so that one provides a skewed sample?
 

rvanwyk

Expert Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2007
Messages
1,628
Try one more MSS;1412. That’s odd; AWS is locally peered and there’s basically a single hop between you and their network. No issues there either. But will keep looking.

For the static IP; please drop support a mail.
Hmmm, video plays instantly now. Going to change it back just to be sure that this was the problem. Thanks!
 

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
2,362
They don't publish absolute numbers so assuming 428 of your users unwittingly provided a sample and of them 13 were ipv6 capable, it works out to be 3%. Afrihost having a much bigger user base provided a much bigger sample of which 10% were Ipv6 capable. Question is, is your 428 vs Afrihost 51000 sample size a fair reflection of the raito of your user base? Also why would users differ in their use of the Internet between the two ISPs so that one provides a skewed sample?
Starting back to front; that's a good question. If we could gain insight into APNIC's chosen ad syndicator, we'd know; APNIC is the RIR for the East, and these stats were initially designed to help them track performance in their areas; not on a global scale. This can be seen by the fact that APNIC's results are almost double the Akamai stats for WA and Afrihost who just made it onto Akamai's board (I can't comment on our performance on Akamai because it's based on unique samples). I'd trust Akamai more as they serve one of the largest CDNs in SA - DSTV Now (which still doesn't support IPv6 ironically).

The numbers are relatively low on APNIC's list, specifically for WA. Vuma reach has a massive effect in terms of sample- this is how you've seen two meteoric rises in v6 across both APNIC and Akamai's results. IPv6 is enabled by default on Reach (so all clients on supported ISPs (WA and Afrihost) get v6), to tens of thousands of eyeballs. We're not on the reach network (very low margin and massive volumes means Vumatel isn't considering smaller ISPs for this network at all). But tens of thousands of reach homes, shared between a handful of ISPs, mean subscriber numbers are skewed relatively higher than ISP distribution on other FNOs. Population density around reach also means more active devices per home. Assuming 5-8 devices per home (which is reasonable for your average 4 person home), all running v6; the sample size collected by APNIC is still relatively small considering the reach of reach (no pun intended). WA for instance, at 23k samples, and assuming 7-8 samples per home (7-8 devices), means only 3-3.5k homes - and their reach footprint is significantly larger than that; and we're not even looking at their L2 and trenched homes. I'm just saying, the stats are useful, but certainly not an absolute reflection of IPv6 usage, adoption or ISP size for any network in question. I'm not going to bash APNIC; considering it's one of two unique sources of information on this matter; I'd rather see some stats than none at all - and admire their effort. Some transparency regarding data collection methodology would be cool. I don't think we're altogether worried about it being a representation of our network stats.

Considering the number of eyeballs on our network, IP utilisation stats, no, I don't think the scale comparison is precise. I personally have more than 13 active IPv6 devices on my LAN at home, so do you. Our office currently has over 50 unique IPv6 sessions active. I can go on, but you get the gist - something's not adding up. Maybe we all just don't like a specific cat video? Without insight from APNIC, I can't tell you more. I'm not fretting about APNIC's results; we're seeing every new L2 client run v6 just fine, we're seeing a growing amount of v6 traffic from older L2 clients as well as a surprising amount from FTTB.
 

Gimli

Senior Member
Joined
Feb 8, 2005
Messages
637
Starting back to front; that's a good question. If we could gain insight into APNIC's chosen ad syndicator, we'd know; APNIC is the RIR for the East, and these stats were initially designed to help them track performance in their areas; not on a global scale. This can be seen by the fact that APNIC's results are almost double the Akamai stats for WA and Afrihost who just made it onto Akamai's board (I can't comment on our performance on Akamai because it's based on unique samples). I'd trust Akamai more as they serve one of the largest CDNs in SA - DSTV Now (which still doesn't support IPv6 ironically).

The numbers are relatively low on APNIC's list, specifically for WA. Vuma reach has a massive effect in terms of sample- this is how you've seen two meteoric rises in v6 across both APNIC and Akamai's results. IPv6 is enabled by default on Reach (so all clients on supported ISPs (WA and Afrihost) get v6), to tens of thousands of eyeballs. We're not on the reach network (very low margin and massive volumes means Vumatel isn't considering smaller ISPs for this network at all). But tens of thousands of reach homes, shared between a handful of ISPs, mean subscriber numbers are skewed relatively higher than ISP distribution on other FNOs. Population density around reach also means more active devices per home. Assuming 5-8 devices per home (which is reasonable for your average 4 person home), all running v6; the sample size collected by APNIC is still relatively small considering the reach of reach (no pun intended). WA for instance, at 23k samples, and assuming 7-8 samples per home (7-8 devices), means only 3-3.5k homes - and their reach footprint is significantly larger than that; and we're not even looking at their L2 and trenched homes. I'm just saying, the stats are useful, but certainly not an absolute reflection of IPv6 usage, adoption or ISP size for any network in question. I'm not going to bash APNIC; considering it's one of two unique sources of information on this matter; I'd rather see some stats than none at all - and admire their effort. Some transparency regarding data collection methodology would be cool. I don't think we're altogether worried about it being a representation of our network stats.

Considering the number of eyeballs on our network, IP utilisation stats, no, I don't think the scale comparison is precise. I personally have more than 13 active IPv6 devices on my LAN at home, so do you. Our office currently has over 50 unique IPv6 sessions active. I can go on, but you get the gist - something's not adding up. Maybe we all just don't like a specific cat video? Without insight from APNIC, I can't tell you more. I'm not fretting about APNIC's results; we're seeing every new L2 client run v6 just fine, we're seeing a growing amount of v6 traffic from older L2 clients as well as a surprising amount from FTT

Interesting comments thanks

- Apnic Afrihost stat today = 11.9%, Akamai Afrihost stat today = 13.2% seems to be a fair correlation between the two.

- Apnic WebAfrica stat today = 49%, Akamai WebAfrica stat today = 31.2% Some variation there but as you say some stats better than no stats.


Shouldn't you be in a position to calculate the amount of users of yours that make an IPV6 connection as a percentage of the total? Would be interesting to see the real number vs. ex Apnic.
 

tehan

Active Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Messages
68
@websquadza My ONT has finally been swopped by Vuma, which will hopefully sort out my connection. Unfortunately, the new ONT needs to be provisioned or something and the guy from Vuma had no idea how long that would take. Any way you guys could speed this up?

Also, what are the benefits/disadvantages of moving to IPv6? And what would I have to do to enable it? Just curious, as I see a lot of people bringing it up in the forum.
 

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
2,362
@websquadza My ONT has finally been swopped by Vuma, which will hopefully sort out my connection. Unfortunately, the new ONT needs to be provisioned or something and the guy from Vuma had no idea how long that would take. Any way you guys could speed this up?

Also, what are the benefits/disadvantages of moving to IPv6? And what would I have to do to enable it? Just curious, as I see a lot of people bringing it up in the forum.

We've escalated this to our SDM and asked him to try get SADV to complete the provisioning ASAP. We'll let you know as soon as he's confirmed that.

With regards to IPv6, please do activate it. Let us know what router you are using and we'll assist. You'll still have a public IPv4 (we support dual stack natively). Some benefits of IPv6; better security at a L7 level, removing NAT from services (eg. Xbox loves v6 and i'm hoping more gaming platforms do soon enough, and VoIP), more address space - that just auto configures and simply works, simplified home network design.. the list goes on. Fundamentally, IPv4 space has run out, not will, it has. IPv6 is the solution to this, not the band aid. By implementing IPv6 now, you get to benefit from all content available on v6 moving to that now, retaining access to v4 and encouraging legacy v4 systems to migrate to v6 transparently.
 

websquadza

WebSquad
Company Rep
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
2,362
Interesting comments thanks

- Apnic Afrihost stat today = 11.9%, Akamai Afrihost stat today = 13.2% seems to be a fair correlation between the two.

- Apnic WebAfrica stat today = 49%, Akamai WebAfrica stat today = 31.2% Some variation there but as you say some stats better than no stats.


Shouldn't you be in a position to calculate the amount of users of yours that make an IPV6 connection as a percentage of the total? Would be interesting to see the real number vs. ex Apnic.

Ok the results correlate closer than my last look. But, some results are better than none. Akamai serve a large amount of CDN traffic, and their stats are likely more realistic. Still amazing to see what a forced IPv6 implementation on a large scale (Reach) can do with v6 traffic numbers. Can't wait to see once Vumatel gets this right on trenched (remember this will still need users to activate their ends). In CPT for example, 50-60% of our client base is on trenched (due to Vuma mainly rolling out trenched in CPT, our linked marketing efforts, and their network being the most expansive there); these clients are almost all excluded from using v6 right now. Some have SIT tunnels, but this is still relatively low. With regards to figures, let me see what I can pull.
 

tehan

Active Member
Joined
Jul 5, 2017
Messages
68
We've escalated this to our SDM and asked him to try get SADV to complete the provisioning ASAP. We'll let you know as soon as he's confirmed that.

With regards to IPv6, please do activate it. Let us know what router you are using and we'll assist. You'll still have a public IPv4 (we support dual stack natively). Some benefits of IPv6; better security at a L7 level, removing NAT from services (eg. Xbox loves v6 and i'm hoping more gaming platforms do soon enough, and VoIP), more address space - that just auto configures and simply works, simplified home network design.. the list goes on. Fundamentally, IPv4 space has run out, not will, it has. IPv6 is the solution to this, not the band aid. By implementing IPv6 now, you get to benefit from all content available on v6 moving to that now, retaining access to v4 and encouraging legacy v4 systems to migrate to v6 transparently.
Thanks! I have an Asus RT-AC68U. Has a nice whole section for IPv6 on it. If you or someone on your team can send me the instructions, I will be happy to activate IPv6.
 

DarkSt0rm

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 4, 2017
Messages
316
We've escalated this to our SDM and asked him to try get SADV to complete the provisioning ASAP. We'll let you know as soon as he's confirmed that.

With regards to IPv6, please do activate it. Let us know what router you are using and we'll assist. You'll still have a public IPv4 (we support dual stack natively). Some benefits of IPv6; better security at a L7 level, removing NAT from services (eg. Xbox loves v6 and i'm hoping more gaming platforms do soon enough, and VoIP), more address space - that just auto configures and simply works, simplified home network design.. the list goes on. Fundamentally, IPv4 space has run out, not will, it has. IPv6 is the solution to this, not the band aid. By implementing IPv6 now, you get to benefit from all content available on v6 moving to that now, retaining access to v4 and encouraging legacy v4 systems to migrate to v6 transparently.
@websquadza IPv6 on Vumatel trenched yet, or still only aerial?
 
Last edited:
Top